The single port IV tubing

  1. I'm not sure what you call these IV tubings quite yet, but I've noticed that when patient's come back from anesthesia they always have these single port IV tubings hooked to them? What is the reason for using this single port, instead of a dual link system? Is there a particular reason anesthesia prefers this type of tubing.


    Thanks
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   kmchugh
    You would have to describe it better, Dustin. Generally, I like tubing with a manifold so that I can connect more than one med at a time to the IV line. However, we do prefer that our tubing have no "flow impediment devices," like pig tails or other things that slow the flow. I like to have a fluid path from the IV bag to the patient that is as unobstructed as possible.

    Kevin McHugh, CRNA
  4. by   DustinRN
    Quote from kmchugh
    You would have to describe it better, Dustin. Generally, I like tubing with a manifold so that I can connect more than one med at a time to the IV line. However, we do prefer that our tubing have no "flow impediment devices," like pig tails or other things that slow the flow. I like to have a fluid path from the IV bag to the patient that is as unobstructed as possible.

    Kevin McHugh, CRNA

    Kevin, I really don't know what they're called. This is my first time seeing pt's with them in. It's just one single lumen that comes from the IV bag straight into the catheter with only one port toward the insertion site to put a med into. I will ask tomorrow in class and see what it's called. I'm on the Neuro science floor and these are the first time I've seen pt's with this kind of tubing. There was also an extension of some kind linked up with it that was red, and it was a two-way knob that seemed like you could stop fluid from going down further into the tubing with it closed. I'll ask someone tomorrow if I can remember. Although, I do believe you answered my questions as to why they come back with that type of line.

    Thanks
  5. by   athomas91
    i could be wrong...just sounds to me like they didn't use an extension set..and the primary tubing is just a one-port tube....the attachment you referred to sounds like a stop-cock which is a very useful little device.
  6. by   DustinRN
    Athoma, I believe the stop-cock is what I was referring to. What's the use of the stop-cock? Geez, I have so much more too learn! I don't think I've ever had to use that with a pt before. I know that most of the tubing we get for patients are stop-cock extension sets. Thanks for the replies.
  7. by   athomas91
    it can be used for multiple things...you can hook add'l tubing into it.....you can attach syringes for freq dosing and leave them attached and just turn the stop cock "off" to the syringe when not in use - this prevents the IV fluid from going into your syringe and diluting your med....etc....
    i frequently attach them to hook my fluid warmer into ...i run my fluids through the warmer in the OR - when the case is done...turn the stop cock off to the outside...and unhook my fluids...pt is still left w/ primary bag and tubing....
  8. by   versatile_kat
    Dustin ... the drips infusing through the lines without the addtional ports your talking about are probably vasoactive. The anesthesiologist/anesthetist initiates their use so no one "accidentally" pushes a med through them, i.e., giving a dose of Lasix through your Nipride line, thinking it was your maintenance IVF. At least, that's the reason we use them. Hope this helps.

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