Sigma Theta Tau

  1. Hey,

    I got into the Sigma Theta Tau honor society thing and I am wondering if anyone believes that it helped them get into grad school. Is it worth forking over the 80 clams?

    Thanks,
    -S
    •  
  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   rn29306
    While the monthly mags are quite a PITA, membership into that organization has carried alot of weight. Granted no one has asked me about it during my 1 interview, but membership gets noticed by other people and they comment on it.

    I would join, then maybe drop it once you are graduated from your master's program. Eighty bucks, isn't there a student rate or is that what the student rate is now? I thought it was 40.
  4. by   kmchugh
    Near the end of my bachelor's program, I was asked to join STT. I did, and paid whatever the going rate in 96 was. I was honored to be asked. After joining, I started cruising the web site, and looking at other publications. What I saw there, and what I witnessed at the STT meetings I attended convinced me that I had joined what was essentially a women's nursing honor society. Oh, they were happy to take my money and have me as a member, but I strongly felt encouraged to sit in the back and shut up. They used me, so I used them. Quit going to meetings, but was able to list my membership on applications to CRNA programs. Whoopee. They didn't really care. Dropped my membership, but let the national leadership know exactly why I was doing so.

    I suppose it does look nice on a resume, but that's about it. Now you have my curiosity up. I haven't looked at the STT website in a coupe of years. Think I'll go back and see if it's changed.

    Kevin McHugh
  5. by   kmchugh
    Just finished perusing their site. It's no different. Apparently, STT believes the only real path to excellence in nursing is to be female, and to become a nursing educator.

    KM
  6. by   Quickbeam
    I'm a member of STTI. Here are my issues:

    1. It's great if you live right near the school you graduated from. Otherwise, you end up joining a chapter that is only interested in recruiting members from their school.

    2. The organization is overly focused on nurse academics. I've been to many of the biennial conferences and it's really all about nurse PhDs and post-docs networking. I presented at a recent biennial and I was the ONLY BSN to do so. Also, all the academics had their school pay their way....I paid my own and there was no support from either of my chapters. Neither of my chapters saw fit to even show up at my session.

    You can join and then stop paying...you're on the rolls forever and you can pay up anytime it suits you. I just got very disappointed in their lack of support for the BSN.
  7. by   Bekahlynn
    Quote from kmchugh
    Near the end of my bachelor's program, I was asked to join STT. I did, and paid whatever the going rate in 96 was. I was honored to be asked. After joining, I started cruising the web site, and looking at other publications. What I saw there, and what I witnessed at the STT meetings I attended convinced me that I had joined what was essentially a women's nursing honor society. Oh, they were happy to take my money and have me as a member, but I strongly felt encouraged to sit in the back and shut up. They used me, so I used them. Quit going to meetings, but was able to list my membership on applications to CRNA programs. Whoopee. They didn't really care. Dropped my membership, but let the national leadership know exactly why I was doing so.

    I suppose it does look nice on a resume, but that's about it. Now you have my curiosity up. I haven't looked at the STT website in a coupe of years. Think I'll go back and see if it's changed.

    Kevin McHugh
    I just wanted to let you know that the current president of STT is a very dynamic man named Dan Pessault. He spoke to my management class. Very neat gentleman. He did not give us the impression that it is a women's honor society. STT was founded at my school, and its international HQ is on the campus, so it is a huge deal here. Mostly to the instructors. To us students, it is not as big a deal.
  8. by   vaRN
    I believe its worth the money, just to have it on your application. I believe it helped me get in. Of course it wasn't a deciding factor, but it was another positive thing that I could put on my application to get me noticed. Personally, I never renewed my membership after the first year, but I think it added a little to my app. Think of it this way, the board is looking at you and another candidate for the last space in a class, your GPA and experience is about the same, you both did well in the interview,etc. That membership could be the positive that tips the scales in your favor!!! 80 clams is not much for a membership these days.
  9. by   Da Monk
    I had a 3.9 GPA in grad school. Anybody know if you can still get into SigThetTau after being out of school 10 years? And if so, how to go about it. Thanks.
  10. by   shirleyTX
    I am completing my BSN in April and was honored to be invited. I accepted and will be inducted the day of graduation. I plan on moving out of state and just found out that the Assoc. dean of the CRNA school I want to apply to is an active member and sits on the leadership committee of that chapter. I think joining this organization is a great tool for networking especially for someone like me that will not know many in this new state.
  11. by   Businessman
    Quote from Da Monk
    I had a 3.9 GPA in grad school. Anybody know if you can still get into SigThetTau after being out of school 10 years? And if so, how to go about it. Thanks.
    Once you graduate, GPA does not have any weight. You can still get in if your name is "supported" by a current member.
    Find a current member and start "working" her/him ...

close