Questions for any CRNA!!! PLEASE!!

  1. 0
    hey, i'm a student at UCF and i have an assignment to complete before the end of my summer B class! i was hoping a working CRNA would be willing to shed some light on their career!

    1) how often do you speak face to face with an MDA or anesthesiologist during an emergency of some sort?

    2) what state do you work in and what are the pros and cons for working for this state?

    3) what path did you take towards reaching this career?

    4) how demanding is this job timewise? do you have enough family time? how much time off do you usually get?

    5) how long were you an RN before you became a CRNA?

    6) what are you responibities as a CRNA?

    7) what made you decide this career?

    8) what is your work enviroment like?

    9) how stressful/ thrilling/ rewarding is this job?

    10) are there any memorable moments you have training or working as a CRNA?

    11) are there any tips about completely school or training as a CRNA that you would like to share?





    thank you to thoses wishing to share!

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  2. 0
    dont be lazy and not comment!
    help a girl out!!
  3. 0
    I just replied.
  4. 1
    Funny you choose the word "lazy" for no one responding when you are the one trying to get a homework assignment done for you on the Internet. Perhaps you should take your own advice and start making phone calls and doing some legwork so YOU can complete YOUR assignment.
    wtbcrna likes this.
  5. 2
    Quote from AllySJ93
    dont be lazy and not comment!
    help a girl out!!
    What you don't have a hospital or surgery center around you that you can go a personally talk to a CRNA yourself? You want me to spend 20 minutes typing up your homework when all you need to do is just go and talk to a CRNA yourself.

    How is that fair to all the other nursing students that actually just come up and ask these questions of us in person, and then go home and type up the answers themselves?

    Most of our communication is done through nonverbal cues. Nursing instructors need to start insisting these assignments be done in person not on the internet! You would learn a lot more by actually sitting down and talking to CRNA for 5 minutes rather than having he or she type out a half page of answers to preset questions.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Jul 25, '12
    Zaphod and MeTheRN like this.
  6. 2
    hey, i'm a student at UCF and i have an assignment to complete before the end of my summer B class! i was hoping a working CRNA would be willing to shed some light on their career!1) how often do you speak face to face with an MDA or anesthesiologist during an emergency of some sort?Whenever I need to. If I see something happening where I think a second, different view would be helpful, I will get one of my group to come in and help. I lean on them and them on me whenever we feel it necessary.2) what state do you work in and what are the pros and cons for working for this state? Indiana. Can't speak for anywhere here but my hospital, but the pros are superb salary, complete autonomy in a group of three ologists and two crnas, awesome people, big deer, low cost of living.Cons: none yet, I'll let you know about the winter once I experience one.3) what path did you take towards reaching this career?BS in biology...AS respiratory therapy, BSN into CVICU, MSNA.4) how demanding is this job timewise? do you have enough family time? how much time off do you usually get?Depends on where you work, but I'm out of the hospital anywhere from 10am to 5pm. I usually am home by 2pm. Call once every 4 days from home and every fifth weekend. Best work schedule of my life and eat dinner with the family every day.5) how long were you an RN before you became a CRNA?2 years.6) what are you responibities as a CRNA?Exactly the same responsibilities, privileges (minus prescriptive authority) and duties as the anesthesiologists. Even if you work somewhere more restrictive, I think you should approach the job as if you are autonomous...it is your butt that will burn if you overlook something that your ologists fail to catch also.7) what made you decide this career?I was an RRT and spent time in the OR during intubation check offs at a new job, and I knew then that I wanted and needed the responsibility that the CRNAs had. Absolutely fascinating, thrilling, important, and demanding job.8) what is your work enviroment like?I struck gold! I love every person I work with in or surgery department. Great, laid back docs all around, OR staff is great, and we have fun.9) how stressful/ thrilling/ rewarding is this job?10/10 in each category.10) are there any memorable moments you have training or working as a CRNA?Many, but I'm trying to forget them, as they only serve to raise my BP. Seriously, school...especially clinicals, will bend you as close to your breaking point as you can get. Many break and don't make it. It should not be this way, but there are many, many a-holes that seem to gravitate to the teaching facilities so that they may project their misery on anyone that they think is too happy.11) are there any tips about completely school or training as a CRNA that you would like to share?Yes, if you are married, make your spouse know that you will be absent from their life for the program. Make them understand that you will be going thru hell at times, and that it's impossible to leave hell at the front door. No matter what happens, realize its because of school, it's temporary, and it will resolve upon graduation. Expect the absolute worst, because at some point, you will experience stuff that words can not describe. Other times, it will be great, but prepare yourselves for the worst, don't let your guard down, and if it's not as bad as you thought, then consider it a bonus. I loved 90% of school, but the 10% that was bad was beyond anything I could have imagined, and you are in a defenseless, vulnerable position with nothing that you can do about it other than to "say the right thing." It is a brutal process, but it's worth it. Remember...you eat the elephant one bite at a time. Some bites are loin, some bites are colon. Just keep chewing...one bite at a time. Good luck!thank you to thoses wishing to share!
    icuRNmia and MeTheRN like this.


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