Question re Post-Op Amnesia - page 3

I am 3 weeks post-op from abdominal hysterectomy with BSO. I had an excellent surgical outcome, despite nothing going as planned and lots of surprises. My only complaint is that the gas passer... Read More

  1. by   athomas91
    the only thing that article continued to refer in regards of measuring "cognitive dysfunction" was psychological testing....were i to have time i would read further into the study - it doesn't cite in the article what type of study it was and therefore it is impossible to identify any validity problems. it does state the authors refute the belief that hypotension etc.. contribute - but it doesn't state how or why they feel they came to that conclusion...


    your last post refers to a hemmorhage - but in previous posts you speak of how surgery went well and without complication...you also stated you are 50 and in good health - but you earlier stated that they couldn't do an epidural due to your weight...an even later post mentions blood in your ear - if you had abdominal surgery and you found blood in your ear - it stands to reason that the blood in the ear would be a huge concern - where did it come from....
    perhaps i am just reading into the differing posts too much - but there seems to be a number of contradictions as well as complications that just keep adding on.....
  2. by   mwbeah
    Quote from athomas91
    the only thing that article continued to refer in regards of measuring "cognitive dysfunction" was psychological testing....were i to have time i would read further into the study - it doesn't cite in the article what type of study it was and therefore it is impossible to identify any validity problems. it does state the authors refute the belief that hypotension etc.. contribute - but it doesn't state how or why they feel they came to that conclusion...


    your last post refers to a hemmorhage - but in previous posts you speak of how surgery went well and without complication...you also stated you are 50 and in good health - but you earlier stated that they couldn't do an epidural due to your weight...an even later post mentions blood in your ear - if you had abdominal surgery and you found blood in your ear - it stands to reason that the blood in the ear would be a huge concern - where did it come from....
    perhaps i am just reading into the differing posts too much - but there seems to be a number of contradictions as well as complications that just keep adding on.....
    You know that anesthesia gets blamed for everything..................
  3. by   Homesick Gypsy
    It seems as though some of the people responding are very defensive, perhaps rightly so. I'm not blaming anyone, including anesthesia. I'm just trying to find some answers. The article said there were 89 papers and that doctors were aware of the situation and research was being done to see if something can be done before surgery to minimize the problem. Besides my personal experience, I find it all very interesting. I'm heartened by the fact that surgical outcomes have become so good, that now research is being focused on the more subtle issues.

    Because of the memory problems, some issues are just coming to light from my daughter and friends that were there. The blood in my ear was never mentioned in my medical records. My daughter thought I might have scratched myself or something. I am overweight yes, but otherwise in excellent health - low blood pressure, low cholesterol, no heart or lung problems...

    Because of the vasculature that had wrapped all around the huge fibroids, I lost quite a bit of blood. I was given hetastarch and my crit kept rising so I didn't need a transfusion, although blood was typed and set aside, according to my records. There were complications during the surgery as far as some unexpected findings once the surgical field was clearly visible, but my outcome was excellent. My surgeon is very good at what he does.

    Yes, both ovaries were removed but I have had zero symptoms of menopause. No hot flashes, no sleep disturbances, nothing. Except for the memory problems, I haven't felt this good in years. It's funny how much pain and discomfort we can learn to put up with.

    In consulting with my doctor, he gave me a prescription for 1 mg. estradiol tablets, even though I have no other menopause symptoms. It has only been two weeks so far but I can't tell much of a difference. Perhaps in another week or so I'll be able to see great improvement. If the estrogen doesn't help, my doctor will refer me to a neurologist to see if there might have been something that happened during the surgery. My dentist is also a board-certified anesthesiologist and told me that he suspects perhaps something did happen, and that sometimes it's so small and subtle, even the anesthesiologist can miss it. If it turns out that I had a mini-stroke or some other form of permanent short-term memory problems, then I'll learn to deal with it. I'm just trying to explore all the possibilities before I just give up. Besides, all the mental gymnastics are good for my brain....

    I'm not angry or blaming anyone. I just thought you might find the article as interesting as I did.
  4. by   jenniek
    Quote from Homesick Gypsy
    The blood in my ear was never mentioned in my medical records.
    The blood could actually be betadine from being prepped, often when it dries it looks like blood. Or if you had a central line placed in your neck, it could easily be from that.
    As far as your surgery, it sounds like less than routine and pretty intensive. If you hematocrit was low, that could affect your memory due to less oxygen carrying capacity.
    There are many factors, and I doubt we could solve the mystery given that we can't see your nor do we have access to your records.
  5. by   makeusleepy
    If you really want to find out what happened during your surgery in terms of anesthesia and want to know if anesthesia is to blame for your current memory problems....why don't you contact the Anesthesia provider or group from your surgery.

    We don't know you, we don't know what happened during your surgery and every person responds so drastically different to anesthesia it is impossible and irresponsible for us to say, "oh, you had a TAH, this is what happened."

    No offense but I think you'd be better off going to the source.
  6. by   Homesick Gypsy
    I was wondering if mwbeah would be so kind as to point me in the direction of the sources you mentioned as something like up to 67% of women having a hysterectomy have cognitive dysfunction following surgery. I have been unable to find much and would appreciate a point in the right direction.

    Thanks.

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