Oral Surgeons doing surgery and providing anesthesia

  1. 0
    http://gma.yahoo.com/man-dies-wisdom...201504759.html

    I will never understand how it is acceptable for oral surgeons with a few months (hopefully at least that much) of anesthesia training providing anesthesia and doing surgery at the same time. We would never allow this in the OR, but somehow it is acceptable practice in the dentists' office....
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Apr 3, '13
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  5. 0
    Crazy. I wonder how much prop he gave him? Sounds like he may have forced the gauze into his airway during CPR.
  6. 0
    Unbelievable
  7. 0
    This is truly trigic. on the other hand... How much will it cost to remove your wisdom teeth if a CRNA or Anesthesiologist is required?
  8. 1
    Quote from SycamoreStudent
    This is truly trigic. on the other hand... How much will it cost to remove your wisdom teeth if a CRNA or Anesthesiologist is required?
    You don't think the surgeon didn't charge for sedation and the surgery do you? It should basically be the same cost to the patient.
    Mully likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna

    You don't think the surgeon didn't charge for sedation and the surgery do you? It should basically be the same cost to the patient.
    They do...at least my oral surgeon did...1,000 dollars. He pushed the med IV. His assistant put the IV in.
  10. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna

    You don't think the surgeon didn't charge for sedation and the surgery do you? It should basically be the same cost to the patient.
    Not to mention that he was sterile and probably had someone else actually do the pushing. That's how my oral surgeons did surgery.
  11. 0
    In theory it would be the same price, but we all know that theory and practice aren't always the same thing.
  12. 1
    Quote from manusko
    Not to mention that he was sterile and probably had someone else actually do the pushing. That's how my oral surgeons did surgery.
    Nothing in the mouth is a true sterile procedure, and unless someone is there with sufficient training and knowledge to do deal with deep sedations then they shouldn't be doing them in the office at all. This is different than giving Versed or Valium before a procedure for anxiolysis.

    I always tell the nurses and obstetricians that I work with that anyone can do epidurals. It is nothing more than a technical skill, but if you don't know how to deal with the potential complications then you shouldn't be doing them. The same goes for sedations, especially deep sedations, if your not prepared to deal with the loss of an airway (up to and including a cricoidthyroidotomy) and you don't have immediate assistance of someone who can then these type of sedations should not be done in the office setting.
    chare likes this.
  13. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna

    Nothing in the mouth is a true sterile procedure, and unless someone is there with sufficient training and knowledge to do deal with deep sedations then they shouldn't be doing them in the office at all. This is different than giving Versed or Valium before a procedure for anxiolysis.

    I always tell the nurses and obstetricians that I work with that anyone can do epidurals. It is nothing more than a technical skill, but if you don't know how to deal with the potential complications then you shouldn't be doing them. The same goes for sedations, especially deep sedations, if your not prepared to deal with the loss of an airway (up to and including a cricoidthyroidotomy) and you don't have immediate assistance of someone who can then these type of sedations should not be done in the office setting.
    Agreed. I was just stating how the procedure went when I was an assistant. They would treat it as a sterile procedure even though they obviously touched unsterile areas. It would be hard not to. So they are gloved and tell someone else how much drug to push. They had pulse ox and ECG hooked up but that is all. Gauze stuffed into the mouth to catch debris.

    Knowing what I know now, I understand how dangerous the whole thing can really be.


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