Not trying to stir up bad ideas, but...... - page 2

Trying to stay away from the SDN is like the forbidden fruit. And I know i am stupid for even caring....but i do. My program starts is 2 months...I have worked for years to get to this point and for... Read More

  1. by   North Cacalacky
    Quote from traumaRUs
    North Cacalacky - What would you classify CRNA's as then, if not mid-level providers?
    I'm really not sure trauma, I can't offer a really good alternative. I think all nurses with degrees beyond BSN's should just be called advanced practice nurses. Perhaps mid-level provider is an appropriate title, but it may have a negative commotaion(Mid-Level as in inferior care) to the public. Advance practice nurse sounds better to me. Just an opinion. What do others think?
  2. by   deepz
    Yah, sorta like the term 'non-physician provider' -- the put-down is implicit.

    Quote from North Cacalacky
    I'm really not sure trauma, I can't offer a really good alternative. I think all nurses with degrees beyond BSN's should just be called advanced practice nurses. Perhaps mid-level provider is an appropriate title, but it may have a negative commotaion(Mid-Level as in inferior care) to the public. Advance practice nurse sounds better to me. Just an opinion. What do others think?
  3. by   jwk
    Quote from North Cacalacky
    I'm really not sure trauma, I can't offer a really good alternative. I think all nurses with degrees beyond BSN's should just be called advanced practice nurses. Perhaps mid-level provider is an appropriate title, but it may have a negative commotaion(Mid-Level as in inferior care) to the public. Advance practice nurse sounds better to me. Just an opinion. What do others think?
    You don't find the expression "mid-level" used much when dealing with the public. It's more in professional situations/discussions. You wouldn't introduce yourself as John Smith, Mid-Level Nurse Anesthetist or Jane Doe, Mid-Level Midwife. It's just a catch-all phrase to include everyone in-between entry level positions (RN, PT, OT, RT, RRT, etc.) and physicians.
  4. by   Brian_SRNA
    Quote from North Cacalacky
    I'm really not sure trauma, I can't offer a really good alternative. I think all nurses with degrees beyond BSN's should just be called advanced practice nurses. Perhaps mid-level provider is an appropriate title, but it may have a negative commotaion(Mid-Level as in inferior care) to the public. Advance practice nurse sounds better to me. Just an opinion. What do others think?
    I totally agree, although some might beleive that the actuall role is mid-level, APN's serve as "direct providers", providing direct, usually untethered care...again...it must be noted that no practitioner of healthcare...be it a doctor, chiropractor, dentist, surgeon, anesthetist or FNP is perfect...the whole BALANCE of healthcare depends on COLLABORATION...anyone that thinks he is above that (with the exception of Dr. Gregory House) is a danger to their profession, and my health. "Independent" practice is kind of a misrepresentation, I like "unobstructed" better. And I think that APN which every nurse( or almost every MSN nurse is, based on state law), is what we are first.....we are all Advanced Practice Nurses first, then we are CRNA's, FNP, CNS, Midwives etc. Just think of a football team. Ask a player what he does he says "I play football" usually, not I am a running back. They realize very well(most of them) that it takes collaboration (teamwork) to achieve there common goal.

    SO my rambling is now done.
    GO TEAM

    Brian
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Thanks Brian and North - I do agree. I do not use mid-level providers except when at the office when talking about our PA's, NPs and me (CNS). Like you both stated, I certainly do use advanced practice when dealing with the public.
  6. by   paindoc
    CRNAs in our state are by law NOT advanced practice nurses. They cannot write narcotic or other prescriptions and can only administer drugs. The state legislature has determined they do not have enough training to be considered advanced practice nurses and just because they can pass gas, that doesn't make them competent to engage in diagnosis and treatment outside the operating room and L&D suites. I know this varies state by state, and largely hinges on whether they will engage in collaborative agreements. When the issue came up in my state, CRNAs did not want to be required to have collaborative agreements with any physician, therefore, they cannot by law be APNs.
  7. by   KannRN
    Quote from paindoc
    CRNAs in our state are by law NOT advanced practice nurses. They cannot write narcotic or other prescriptions and can only administer drugs. The state legislature has determined they do not have enough training to be considered advanced practice nurses and just because they can pass gas, that doesn't make them competent to engage in diagnosis and treatment outside the operating room and L&D suites. I know this varies state by state, and largely hinges on whether they will engage in collaborative agreements. When the issue came up in my state, CRNAs did not want to be required to have collaborative agreements with any physician, therefore, they cannot by law be APNs.
    Wow! only administer drugs? not enough training because they only pass gas? and this leads to inadequate competence therefore they are not classified as APN's? PLEASE share with me what state this is! Thanks!!
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Wow - I'm curious too - which state paindoc?
  9. by   Brian_SRNA
    I am very curious what state this is too.....hmmm, with a name paindoc I guess what profession he might be in. Please let us know what state and where we can find the "legislature that says CRNA's dont have enough training to..."

    Brian
  10. by   nursetim
    I'm asking from ignorance here, what can mda's do that crna's can not? As to paindoc assertion, I will be an apn, but that in no way makes me able to pass gas. If crna's can not prescribe how can they practice independently?
  11. by   paindoc
    Indiana. And I did not say there was legislation...but that the legislature made that determination in their deliberations regarding CRNAs vs APNs.
    We have specific requirements in IN for APN that are in excess of what CRNAs bring to the table. Of course CRNAs have the option of going to NP school for 2 years if they really want to be treated as APNs.
  12. by   sc17
    Quote from yoga crna

    I have extensive experience and education in the profession of NURSE ANESTHESIOLOGY, the law and the business of anesthesia. We are one of the most elite professions in the country and are proud of our role in making surgery painless and safe. The AANA, our professional organization has the reputation for being the strongist in nursing and over 95% of all CRNAs are members.



    yoga crna (independent practitioner of anesthesia)
    ANESTHESIOLOGY is the practice of medicine. The term "nurse anesthesiology" is incorrect. You are not a physician and you do not practice anesthesiology. Nurse anesthesia is a more accurate term.
  13. by   skipaway
    Quote from sc17
    ANESTHESIOLOGY is the practice of medicine. The term "nurse anesthesiology" is incorrect. You are not a physician and you do not practice anesthesiology. Nurse anesthesia is a more accurate term.
    Anesthesiology is the practice and study of anesthesia. Nurses and Doctors both practice and study anesthesia. It's a matter of semantics. The ASA wants the public to only associate Doctors with the "ology" part of the word. But as a CRNA, I definately practice and study anesthesia so I feel I can use the words Nurse Anesthesiology if I want to. I'm sure Yoga CRNA will have a response for you too.
    Last edit by skipaway on Nov 11, '06

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