New Grad interested in CRNA - page 2

I just graduated with my BSN and passed boards this month. I have already been accepted into the graduate school in my hometown (to get core classes done) and plan to do the nurse anesthesia... Read More

  1. by   jwk
    Quote from CRNA, DNSc
    Those requirement include graduation from an accredited program of nursing, hold an RN license, and have a minimum of one year experience as an RN.
    The above quote is why I asked the question. Is the NATIONAL standard a year of critical care, or just the year of experience? I'm not doubting you, just wanting to clarify.

    For some reason, the AANA keeps their accreditation standards behind a password-protected link on their website and refuses to release a copy of the standards to individuals who request them. Can anyone explain the reasoning behind that? Why would accreditation standards be secret?
  2. by   gaspassah
    this was from a large pdf file so i just took what was relevant.

    b. At least one year of experience as a RN in an acute care setting (see Glossary).
    From glossary
    Acute care experience - Work experience during which an RN has developed as an
    independent decision-maker capable of using and interpreting advanced monitoring techniques
    based on knowledge of physiological and pharmacological principles.
  3. by   CRNAwannabe
    Quote from CRNA, DNSc
    In response to CRNAWannbe- The schools are absolutely telling you the truth. THe Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs mandates that a program accept only those applicants that meet minimum requirements. Those requirement include graduation from an accredited program of nursing, hold an RN license, and have a minimum of one year experience as an RN. THe program may set more rigorous requirements such as the type of experience or length, GRE or MAT scores, GPAs etc but may not set lesser requirement under risk of losing accreditation. If the program is not accredited it's graduates may not take the certifiying exam or earn the credential CRNA.
    CRNA, DNSc, I realize you serve on the decision making committee of one of the schools, I just wanted to clarify. Do you mean that they cannot accept "applications" until the requirements are met or simply a school could not admit anyone who had not met the criteria. I have know of students who graduated in May 2003 and will enter CRNA school Sept. 2004. They applied (to accredited schools) in the fall before they had even as much as 6 months experience. However, they will have 1 year 3 months experience upon their entry into the program. If the standards were "application" then the overall standard would be essentially 2 years experience since most schools start the application process for the following year in the fall. Thank you for your help.
  4. by   Kiwi
    CRNA DNSc, I too have questions. When I visited MTSA, one of their students told me that she had been accepted after only having worked for three months in the ICU (she had just graduated and began her nursing work in the ICU). She had her full year in critical care prior to starting the program, but NOT prior to her interview.

    Just like CRNAwannabe, I graduate May 2005, and will probably take my boards in early June. If we assume that I am an RN at that time, and I will have three months prior to my interview, could I possibly be accepted for the class beginning in August 2006? Thanks.
  5. by   u-r-sleeepy
    Quote from ether
    CRNA DNSc, I too have questions. When I visited MTSA, one of their students told me that she had been accepted after only having worked for three months in the ICU (she had just graduated and began her nursing work in the ICU). She had her full year in critical care prior to starting the program, but NOT prior to her interview.

    Just like CRNAwannabe, I graduate May 2005, and will probably take my boards in early June. If we assume that I am an RN at that time, and I will have three months prior to my interview, could I possibly be accepted for the class beginning in August 2006? Thanks.
    That is a real possibility - depending on which school you are dealing with. In my school (which still remains unnamed for good reasons) they allowed people to apply early and be accepted just like you stated. I believe 1 or 2 of my classmates actually had LESS than 1 year by the time CRNA school started so... it IS possible to do such a thing.

    Sleeepy

    PS Please don't ask me which school I attended - I might expose myself to a libel lawsuit with some of the statements I could make - even though they would all be true.
  6. by   Kiwi
    Quote from u-r-sleeepy
    Please don't ask me which school I attended - I might expose myself to a libel lawsuit with some of the statements I could make - even though they would all be true.
    Don't worry - I won't ask.
  7. by   u-r-sleeepy
    Quote from ether
    Don't worry - I won't ask.
    Hahahahaha!!! Sounds like you might know just which school I'm talking about??? :uhoh21: Then again - maybe not?

    Sleeepy
  8. by   CRNA, DNSc
    THe Council on Accreditation is only concerned that the applicant have a minimum of 1 year experience as an RN prior to starting the program. School may have policies that indicate greater minimums or that the 1 yr requirement be met prior to application- thats up to the program. A program may have stricter or stronger minimum requirement but not less than the COA. The COA guidelines do not use the word critical care in the requirement and leave the definition of acceptable types of critical care experience/units to the individual schools. That is why some schools accept ER, PICU, or NICU and others do not (or rank them lower).
  9. by   Kiwi
    Thanks for your feedback, CRNA DNSc.
  10. by   TennRN2004
    I know I have also heard some school will accept ER experience, but my school strictly accepts ICU experience only. I have talked a lot to one of my faculty that is on the anesthesia board for the acceptance committee and have been told it is not even necessarily the specific ICU (some people think you have to have SICU to get or another ICU with surgery patients) but rather the critial thinking and clinical judgement you get in dealing with acutely ill patients. This is the type of knowledge you need to be prepared for anesthesia school.
    As far as applying the first year, I thought about it, but I will be in orientation for 16 weeks at my ICU. I would be off orientation for a month whenever I applied! I decided because of how competitive it is to get in that I would be a better candidate after more experience. I think what is all comes down to though is narrowing down which schools you are interested in and talking to those schools specifically to find out their requirements, rules on applying, etc. I know for example the school I am looking at does not require organic chem but many schools do. It just all depends on the school.
  11. by   jwk
    Quote from CRNA, DNSc
    THe Council on Accreditation is only concerned that the applicant have a minimum of 1 year experience as an RN prior to starting the program. School may have policies that indicate greater minimums or that the 1 yr requirement be met prior to application- thats up to the program. A program may have stricter or stronger minimum requirement but not less than the COA. The COA guidelines do not use the word critical care in the requirement and leave the definition of acceptable types of critical care experience/units to the individual schools. That is why some schools accept ER, PICU, or NICU and others do not (or rank them lower).
    So the requirement from a NATIONAL standpoint is one year as an RN with no NATIONAL requirement for critical care experience?
  12. by   loisane
    Quote from jwk
    So the requirement from a NATIONAL standpoint is one year as an RN with no NATIONAL requirement for critical care experience?
    Gaspassah has already answered your question, see post #15. The quote there is from the national accreditation standard that you are inquiring about.

    CRNA DNSc is trying to clarify the questions about WHEN the 1 yr must be completed, not WHERE.

    loisane crna
  13. by   InterestedRN
    Quote from TennRN2004
    My plan is to apply next November. By then, I will have about 18 months experience. If I get accepted for the May 2006 class, I will then have 2 years when I start. I do believe the school I am interested in would let me apply this November, which would give me 5-6 months, but they prefer for you to wait until you have a year before applying. The reason I was asking how long everyone usually waits is bc I know in my area some of the nurses here have 5+ years of experience when they get in CRNA and I have heard they have an easier time with classes, clinicals, bc of more exposure to drugs, vents, invasive lines, etc.
    Congrats on finishing your BSN. My first advice (having been down this road, with the same eagerness and excitement), is be careful about taking the graduate credits before you are accepted into a program. Many schools won't allow those credits to be applied toward the final degree. You must obtain the credits through their program. So, do your research! Second, don't put all your eggs in one basket. It sounds like you REALLY want to be a CRNA (rightfully so!), play it smart, formulate and apply a well thought-out stategy. Unfortunately, it IS going to take some time. That is the hardest part. Look at a variety of schools, and apply to them. This looks good in the interview process.

    Keep up the good fight, good luck, and hang in there! I'm sure you will do great!

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