learning to intubate

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    CRNAs and SRNAs, How long did it take you to successfully intubate a patient for the first time. I have tried 6 times without success.

    Thanks in advance.
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  4. 0
    Quote from cube
    CRNAs and SRNAs, How long did it take you to successfully intubate a patient for the first time. I have tried 6 times without success.

    Thanks in advance.
    I got my 1st one on my 1st attempt, but that was after several practice sessions in the lab on a mannaquein. Don't feel bad though, because I missed the very next one and the CRNA with me had to intubate the patient.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on May 25, '08
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    Congratulations
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    Don't worry about it dude. Keep trying, eventually it will become as routine as starting an IV. As a side note, I have heard that using the maxillary incisors as a fulcrum earns you mega bonus points with the CRNAs and attendings.
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    im not a CRNA but i have worked in surgery for a total of 10 years. I have had the privilege of intubating a couple of times(patients did not have teeth). I have asked this same question of all CRNA's that i had the honor of working with and they all said patients without teeth are easier (of course) because u can concentrate more on the anatomy and not have to worry about replacing a tooth. Also with the different intubation tools( mac vs. miller, LMA, etc) you just have to find the right one for you!!. Good luck!!! I think all people who are willing to go into the anesthesia field are 1 of a kind!!!!
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    It probably took me about three or four times. The hardest thing for me was getting used to looking at the "real" anatomy as opposed to intubating a dummy. The first time I put the blade in someone's mouth I was like, "what the h*ll am I looking at?" But after I got used to the anatomy, it became much easier. Best of luck to you!!
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    I have always found intubating to one of the more difficult things in medicine to perform. If you consider the training.............most of the time you are either doing it on a dummy, learning in a code where time is VERY limiited and everyone is in a panic or doing it as an emergent or semi emergent procedure. As a RT, I had to rotate through OR to learn. I read everything I could find to read and even got in on intubating cadavers which helped a lot. Get an anesthesiologist or a CRNA to help you with your technique and you will get it eventually. Also, the choice of a MAC or Miller blade is a personal preference. People can usually work with a MAC easier, however sometimes it is easier to see with a Miller. Good luck.
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    I have had LUCK intubating with a MAC blade but my Miller blade stats are about 60%. I find when I cannot get a good view with the MAC, it is usually because I haven't swept the tongue far enough to the left. I sometimes just push upward and midline and when I am cognizant of my technique, I push upward and left and this usually sweeps the tongue and displaces the epliglottis enough for me to see the cords.

    I am still working on my Miller skills but I have been told that if you enter the blade to the farthest right, it will assist in movin the tongue when you push to the left. I know it sounds easy but I haven't truly gotten it yet.

    Good luck!!!! Maybe you can practice on the mannequin with a friend to see if they can see what you can maybe try differently...sending you positive vibes!
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    I missed my first got my second and went up and down for the first month until my ups were all I had, it is just a motor skill anyone can perfect if they practice. Just remember to take your time. If you preoxygenate well you can screw around for 5-6 minute everything just the way you want it practice the sequence of events in your head, induce, perform said steps calmly and methodically, the patient is not going anywhere and will be fine, so what if it takes 2 minutes? In time you will get good and before you know it you will get that tube in PDQ every time, just remember to always make your first shot your best shot.
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    Quote from joeyzstj
    I have always found intubating to one of the more difficult things in medicine to perform.
    Surely you meant "More difficult things in Nursing." :wink2:


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