If you became CRNA for the money did you end up...... - page 3

End up loving it? I'm strongly considering CRNA school for many reasons but primarily the salary. My opinion toward anesthesia right now is that it's not a passion or anything, I don't love it, I... Read More

  1. by   Onmyway110>
    CRNA school consumes your life. I'm just finishing up my first semester in a front loaded program so I'm pretty new to the rigors of school compared to others. However, in order to succeed you have to hit the ground running from the first day of class. If you slack off, you WILL be behind. The volume of material that you must know is extreme, and working while in school, hell having any distractions at all, can affect your grades. I average about 8 hours a day of studying not including class time. I advise you to shadow a CRNA to get a better feel for the profession. If you have any hesitations after that, then do not pursues this field. Time, energy and discipline are needed to succeed in school, but in order to not quit you have to have a passion for what your learning. Bright students fail out of CRNA programs all the time; intelligence alone is not enough sometimes.
  2. by   prelift
    lol have to shadow one before you dump your life into a lifetime of sitting in the OR, less patient contact than most other specialties, and pumping drugs.
    One surgery rotation and one anesthesia rotation and I was like "nah brah ill pass."

    If you enjoy pharm and physio and such though it may be for you. But those 8 weeks of surg and 4 of anesthesia was enough for me lol
  3. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from Onmyway110>
    CRNA school consumes your life.
    And I thought nursing school was the worst...
  4. by   dbabz
    One of my instructors is an APN and he made a really good point about CRNA. He said that his malpractice insurance is about $1,800.00/year, whereas CRNAs will pay about $18,000.00, eating up much more than the salary difference between the two. If you don't have a passion for it, the money probably isn't worth it.
  5. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from dbabz
    One of my instructors is an APN and he made a really good point about CRNA. He said that his malpractice insurance is about $1,800.00/year, whereas CRNAs will pay about $18,000.00, eating up much more than the salary difference between the two. If you don't have a passion for it, the money probably isn't worth it.
    I'm not sure where he's getting his numbers but that's about 4 times the actual cost of malpractice insurance for a typical CRNA. Most CRNAs who work in anesthesia groups don't even pay for malpractice insurance because they are covered by their groups malpractice insurance. My professor who is a practicing CRNA said when she worked in an all CRNA independent practice she paid for her own and it was about $3000 a year.
  6. by   dbabz
    Quote from Bluebolt
    I'm not sure where he's getting his numbers but that's about 4 times the actual cost of malpractice insurance for a typical CRNA. Most CRNAs who work in anesthesia groups don't even pay for malpractice insurance because they are covered by their groups malpractice insurance. My professor who is a practicing CRNA said when she worked in an all CRNA independent practice she paid for her own and it was about $3000 a year.
    Mea Culpa--being a student, I took him at his word. Does bring up a good question though. What is the average salary of a CRNA and is the extra money worth it if you could make a similar salary as an APN? The whole question would be moot, however, if you really love anesthesia...and I could definitely see it being a good fit for some people.
  7. by   Bluebolt
    dbabz, Salary.com states "The median annual Certified Nurse Anesthetist salary is $173,541, as of June 28, 2017".

    Of course, no amount of money is worth it if it's not a career you're passionate about. I have friends who are NPs and work for about $70k a year and love their jobs. Money shouldn't be the main focus in career fulfillment.
  8. by   subee
    It was fun in the early days before medicine became so cookbook based . The last 10 years were hell. You are a corporate widget making money for the lazy guys sitting in the anesthesia office. They always seem to be too busy to give meal breaks for any break at all. The only way to get them to move was to announce into the phone that a tampon had to be changed. The production pressures gave me PTSD. I had nightmares for several years after leaving. It was a pleasure in the beginning when I worked alone. I loved the the instant gratification of an excellent anesthetic. There's a reason why we have so many addicts. Most are adrenaline addicts before starting school. I left to devote more time to working face to face with them. You earn mire than you make.
    Last edit by subee on Jul 20 : Reason: Typo
  9. by   traumaRUs
    I shadowed several CRNAs before I decided that I couldn't stand still long enough to do the job. I still go to the OR every year or so to do intubations to keep up my skillset (volunteer pre-hospital RN at the ALS level). However, I still know I made the right decision to choose another route.

    That said, my recent experience with a surgical procedure was phenomenal! The CRNA had 40 years experience, extremely personable and we talked for 30 minutes prior to going back to the OR.

    So...CRNAs do have to have people skills too in addition to being clinically competent.
  10. by   Gassadist
    Bluebolt. ...You are right.But with overtime it can easily reach to 250k or more.Many places give time and half.Which don't give that,they give you 90 and hour or more on W2.
  11. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Gassadist
    Bluebolt. ...You are right.But with overtime it can easily reach to 250k or more.Many places give time and half.Which don't give that,they give you 90 and hour or more on W2.
    Huh? That didn't make a whole lot of sense, but I get that you think the opportunity to work bunches of overtime and make bunches of money through overtime is an advantage. On the other hand, not everyone wants to live at work. Some would like to actually go home and see their families.
  12. by   BigPappaCRNA
    This is completely ludicrous statement.
    Quote from gettingbsn2msn
    If you are a "people person" there is a good chance that you will not like being a CRNA. I am very outgoing and that is why I became a NP. I also love science. However, even the hospitals and private clinics do not want people persons anymore. They want robots lol! I have always been told I spend too much time with patients, BUT I always get good reviews.
  13. by   BigPappaCRNA
    If you can't "breeze" through your BSN, you should not consider CRNA school. Look into other areas of focus. CRNA school is on the order of several magnitudes more difficult. BSN as four years of easy easy easy.
    Quote from TheAtomicStig_702
    How the hell did you breeze through your BSN? And how the hell can I do the same? LMAO

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