ICU nurse managers lack of support.......

  1. I am starting CRNA school in 4 months. So, in the meantime I am working as an ICU nurse. I just started at a new hospital until school starts. I did not want to tell my nurse manager that I was in a CRNA program until I "felt" her out. When she asked me my "long term goals",(not knowing I was already accepted) I mentioned becoming a CRNA....she then stated "well, I know that's the latest buzz, but I dont think that is a very promising route because of the "good ole boy network", and the lack of jobs." I was VERY irritated, but knew right away that I am just going to do my time here before I start school. Did anyone else find a lack of support from your nurse manager?? I was hoping to establish rapport with her and then come back in 2 years as a CRNA to that hospital. Is it true that upper nursing management positions are discouraging of anethesia?, in that they think you are leaving the profession of nursing.(not that I care, Im doing it anyway!!)
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   bwt02
    I got a simular response when the word got out that I am starting CRNA school in June. Initially everyone was very supportive, then the backstabbing comments came around. "He thinks he knows everything" and the better one " He's only been a nurse for a year and he really thinks he can be a CRNA".
  4. by   URgettingsleepy
    A few of my favorites so far...

    Oh, one of those...
    Your leaving nursing too...
    good luck with the debt...
    what about talking to patients...
    blank stare.
  5. by   yoga crna
    The important thing to remember is that three years from now, you will be a CRNA and she will still be an ICU manager. You will have a wonderful career, get paid what you are worth, have the opportunity for independence and give the most intense patient care in the nursing profession and she will still be complaining about not getting any respect.

    Learn early on how to defend your career choice. It gets easier the more you do it,
  6. by   yoga crna
    Hold on everyone--let's not lower ourselves to the frequently seen nursing mentality of eating our young and back-biting each other. Respect is earned and goes both directions. I am proud to have a wonderful working relationship with all of the nurses in our surgery center. We respect each other, compliment each other and focus on what is important. I have learned how to deal with nurses who do not command respect and have even gone as far as reporting one to the Board of Nursing for abandonment of a patient so she could have lunch with a friend. She was fired on the spot and to this day doesn't understand what she did wrong. We need each other.

    Although I understand frustration, we would be considered more professional if we avoid foul language on this forum and in our general interpersonal relationships. Just my opinion.
    Yoga
    Last edit by yoga crna on Apr 15, '04
  7. by   Passin' Gas
    Quote yoga crna: "Respect is earned and goes both directions. I am proud to have a wonderful working relationship with all of the nurses in our surgery center. We respect each other, compliment each other and focus on what is important. I have learned how to deal with nurses who do not command respect and have even gone as far as reporting one to the Board of Nursing for abandonment of a patient so she could have lunch with a friend. She was fired on the spot and to this day doesn't understand what she did wrong. We need each other." italics added
    As usual, succinct and to the point.

    I, fortunately, upon acceptance to nurse anesthesia school was not subjected to negative comments from peers. Perhaps I was too elated to 'hear' the negative comments!? Aside, hang in there, nurse anesthesia IS NURSING, you are providing CONSTANT AND CONTINUAL care to your patients. Always.

    I believe some of the less than supportive comments may derive from units being left short staffed after the nurses leave for anesthesia school. Short to start, now, their 'prime' nurses leave. Tough on any nurse manager.

    Just exposing the other side.

    PG
  8. by   jbro
    my supervisor was very supportive, as were my co-workers, of course some people were bitter, but i think they were more jealous than anything, i still talk to my old co-workers at least once a month and visit whenever i go back home, the ones who were bitter at first have melloed and everything is cool again

    Quote from melrey11
    I am starting CRNA school in 4 months. So, in the meantime I am working as an ICU nurse. I just started at a new hospital until school starts. I did not want to tell my nurse manager that I was in a CRNA program until I "felt" her out. When she asked me my "long term goals",(not knowing I was already accepted) I mentioned becoming a CRNA....she then stated "well, I know that's the latest buzz, but I dont think that is a very promising route because of the "good ole boy network", and the lack of jobs." I was VERY irritated, but knew right away that I am just going to do my time here before I start school. Did anyone else find a lack of support from your nurse manager?? I was hoping to establish rapport with her and then come back in 2 years as a CRNA to that hospital. Is it true that upper nursing management positions are discouraging of anethesia?, in that they think you are leaving the profession of nursing.(not that I care, Im doing it anyway!!)
  9. by   Love767
    Shouldn't nurses stick together no matter what specialty they choose? If most nurses supported one another then the health care establishment would have to listen.
  10. by   nursemaa
    Just another fine example of the culture of nursing- beat each other up, put each other down, don't support each other....why are we doing this, people? And how do we stop it?

    There are so many opportunities in nursing; seems like whenever someone decides to go any route that is not at the bedside on a nursing unit, they are criticized. And those who stay at the bedside are criticized for not doing something else. I wonder why so many nurses feel obliged to make judgements about others' career decisions?

    It's starting to drive me a little crazy....
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from nursemaa
    Just another fine example of the culture of nursing- beat each other up, put each other down, don't support each other....why are we doing this, people? And how do we stop it?
    I've worked in other professions, and this problem is not limited to nursing.

    IMHO, the real problem is human nature. Unfortunately, I don't know how you can change that.

    :uhoh21:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 15, '04
  12. by   TraumaNurse
    First I would like to ask everyone on this BB to please remain civil and professional. Thank you.

    As to the OP, I think you should not get too concerned about what others in the nursing profession think about your plans. You will find people who are envious and those that are jealous and resentfull. Don't let it bother you.
    Work hard in the ICU while you are there and after you get accepted to CRNA school, give your manager plenty of notice to find new staff.
    There are some managers who will always react unprofessionally and those who will be very professional.
    I moved to a new state with plans to go to CRNA school but had not yet been accepted. I found out shortly after starting my new job that I was accepted but waited several months before I told anyone. I established a good working relationship with the staff and my manager before I let them know my plans. You will always hear some snide remarks but for the most part people have been excited and happy for me. My manager was very supportive and said she was sorry to lose me but happy that I was leaving for career advancement and not just because I was unhappy. My name now sits on the BB at work congratulating me and another co-worker for starting CRNA school next month.
    So to answer your question, I don't think that managers as a whole are unsupportive, I think it is very individualized to each managers personal beliefs and biases. Good luck.
  13. by   clickhere
    Wouldn't your manager know when you apply since you are need a recommendation from your manager?
  14. by   nilepoc
    Quote from clickhere
    Wouldn't your manager know when you apply since you are need a recommendation from your manager?
    Not necessarily each school has pretty different requirements for recommendations.

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