Here's what AAs really think of CRNAs - page 25

And this comes from the PRESIDENT of the American Society of Anesthesiologist Assistants Again, assertions that AAs and CRNAs function at the same level -absolutely misleading. And, what's... Read More

  1. by   jwk
    Quote from FL-RN
    Just read this whole thread - wow.

    Brief intro: I'm an SICU nurse of 5 years, finishing the BSN bridge this semester and have interviewed for a CRNA program this fall.

    Deepz, I've enjoyed your posts greatly, and you've given me some real insight into the politics underlying this issue.

    My two cents: I think that any anesthesia provider without significant "bedside" type experience (MDA and AA) is going to be at a disadvantage for some time when beginning practice. An example is this semester when I shadowed a CRNA for 180 hours as part of the BSN coursework. It was in an "anesthesia team" practice with 1 MDA overseeing around four rooms that could have CRNA's or MDA-residents. When providing a lunch break to an MDA-resident with a CRNA for a CABG case I witnessed firsthand why the CRNA's spoke so poorly of some of the residents... ACT's not done timely, proper meds not drawn up and ready, Nitro gtt infusing onto the floor, dosing "cheat sheet" w/ wrong pt. weight, etc. Basically a comedy of novice mistakes and general disorganization. And this provider would soon be in a sort of "supervisory" role as she was in the latter half of her last year. For what it's worth, I think all the talk of prereq's and such is of far less concern than actual hands-on experience. Time management and organization is so much more critical in anesthesia.
    The difference is that anesthesia residents are still learning - the CRNA's have already finished their educational program.
  2. by   jwk
    Quote from rayman
    As far as Rayman's post - total BS. Don't throw the HIPAA crap up. All that shows is that you're probably making it up and trying to use that as an excuse not to include any identifying info (feel free to PM me with specifics - not that I have any illusions that you would have the guts to do that).

    jwk,

    I tried to pm you, but it says your box is full and it won't accept it until you delete some stuff...

    ps..empty your box if you really want pm's
    The box is now empty.
  3. by   apaisRN
    Quote from jwk
    The difference is that anesthesia residents are still learning - the CRNA's have already finished their educational program.
    The good news about CRNAs is that we have a structured curriculum and preceptors assigned to keep us from enacting the scenario portrayed above. As my father-in-law, a urologist, says "no one wants a first year anesthesia resident."
  4. by   Ventjock
    ......
    Last edit by Ventjock on Feb 12, '08 : Reason: .........
  5. by   Nitecap
    Quote from ramiro_ac
    [sarcasm on]
    a way to solve the problem is simply this:

    have all AA's take the CRNA exam and whoever passes becomes a CRNA/AA. have all CRNA's take the AA exam and " "
    so if an AA new grad can pass the CRNA exam then the CRNA's can shut up, and if a CRNA new grad can pass the AA exam then the AA's can shut up and stop the arguing on both sides

    now can a CRNA or AA pass the boards that the MDA has to pass??????

    (this should also be done for NP/PAs.........)
    [/sarcasm]

    I am a firm believer that anyone that is smart which Im sure all of us (SRNA, CRNA,AA) are then anyone can pass any test if they work hard, are dedicated, diligent, and study their a$$ off. Thats just me though.
  6. by   Ventjock
    Quote from Nitecap
    I am a firm believer that anyone that is smart which Im sure all of us (SRNA, CRNA,AA) are then anyone can pass any test if they work hard, are dedicated, diligent, and study their a$$ off. Thats just me though.
    true dat. the titles may be different, but the title doesnt necessarily indicate the most qualified provider. if that were true then MD's would be the best at.......EVERYTHING
  7. by   jwk
    Quote from ramiro_ac
    [sarcasm on]
    a way to solve the problem is simply this:

    have all AA's take the CRNA exam and whoever passes becomes a CRNA/AA. have all CRNA's take the AA exam and " "
    so if an AA new grad can pass the CRNA exam then the CRNA's can shut up, and if a CRNA new grad can pass the AA exam then the AA's can shut up and stop the arguing on both sides

    now can a CRNA or AA pass the boards that the MDA has to pass??????

    (this should also be done for NP/PAs.........)
    [/sarcasm]
    Believe it or not, many years ago several AA's offered to challenge the CRNA exam and were turned down.
  8. by   lmdscd
    Well the difference is nurses have a 4 year lic degree before the crna course .
  9. by   DebbieSue
    This damned horse has been kicked over and over and *someone* keeps resuscitating it.....

    Will someone PLEASE shoot it in the head and put it out of it's (my, our) misery.

    WHERE are the moderators of this forum????

  10. by   keira
    How true IS it that the salary of a nurse anaesthetist is $500 per hour? How much you're going to spend to become a CRNA? thank you...
  11. by   deepz
    Quote from keira
    How true IS it that the salary of a nurse anaesthetist is $500 per hour? How much you're going to spend to become a CRNA? thank you...

    You must be thinking of AAs.


    !
  12. by   subee
    Quote from keira
    How true IS it that the salary of a nurse anaesthetist is $500 per hour? How much you're going to spend to become a CRNA? thank you...

    It is patently untrue - I think you've added an extra 0 to the figure.
  13. by   pkapple
    popped into this thread really late, so if its been mentioned forgive me.

    AA is to CRNA as PA is to ARNP--different modalities in training, essentially same level of practice. Good and bad found in every provider level.

    Only way AA affects CRNA jobs/pay is supply and demand, doc preference.

    BTW, my DH is a PA, chose this over ARNP after several agonizing months of comparing educational models.(20+ yr RN)

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