Hard Core Science Degree plus ADN vs. BSN

  1. 0
    Hi,

    I have been a lurker on this board for probably a year, and now find myself in need of advice from some of you. I have shadowed a CRNA for awhile, and I'm confident that this is the path I want to pursue. I have a degree in Biology and Chemistry with alot of other "hard core" science (GPA 3.7). My first step is to get an RN license, and here is where I have a dilemma. I've been accepted to a top five nursing school to complete a 2nd degree BSN at $40,000 for the program. Or I can apply to my local community college which has an accelerated ADN (completed in 1 year) for $5,000. Most of the CRNA schools I want to apply to only require that you have a bachelor's degree and an RN license. Would I hurt myself in the long-run to only get an ADN? Financially, I think I prefer not to get into so much debt before CRNA school.

    What is your advice? Thanks!

    woolfda
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  4. 7 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    All signs point to community college. It is more affordable, faster and you already have your bachelors. However, you will have to take health assessment and statistics when you are finished. Don't worry, i am sure your new job will have tuition reimbursement.
    Quote from d&d's mom
    Hi,

    I have been a lurker on this board for probably a year, and now find myself in need of advice from some of you. I have shadowed a CRNA for awhile, and I'm confident that this is the path I want to pursue. I have a degree in Biology and Chemistry with alot of other "hard core" science (GPA 3.7). My first step is to get an RN license, and here is where I have a dilemma. I've been accepted to a top five nursing school to complete a 2nd degree BSN at $40,000 for the program. Or I can apply to my local community college which has an accelerated ADN (completed in 1 year) for $5,000. Most of the CRNA schools I want to apply to only require that you have a bachelor's degree and an RN license. Would I hurt myself in the long-run to only get an ADN? Financially, I think I prefer not to get into so much debt before CRNA school.

    What is your advice? Thanks!

    woolfda
    Last edit by kjt2004 on Mar 27, '05
  6. 0
    My advice is to look around for CRNA schools which you think you may apply to down the road. Usually location is a prime factor here. Then call the program directors and explain the situation, and ask if the BSN is eomthing you really need. My guess is "no" if you already have a hard science degree with a terrific GPA. It makes a lot more sense to get into critical care ASAP then spend all that time and money on a degree you don't need.
  7. 0
    Depends on the school you want to attend. Most, not all, of the schools that I've seen that award an MSN with a post-master's certificate require a BSN. Those that award an MS in nurse anesthesia or "other" similar master's will take any hard science or a BSN. Look where you want to attend and decide if you would be willing to move if need be to attend the appropriate school.

    Another way to look at it is, every single CRNA programm WILL accept a BSN. Not all CRNA programs will accept a degree other than a BSN.

    Personally, if I had your degree and your GPA i wouldn't waste my time on the BSN. Seeing that you obviously like hard science courses the BSN theory garbage will probably make you want to vomit.

    D.C.
    Last edit by UCDSICURN on Mar 28, '05
  8. 0
    I was in a similar situation. I went the ADN route and finshed in 15 months. I then went to work obtaining my ICU experience. While I was working I obtained my BSN on line and let my hospital pay for it. I agree with the advice about talking to program directors at schools you want to apply to. Keep in mind that without the BSN you are slightly limited as to where you can apply. In addition, if you ever want to teach at a program that awards the MSN, you need the MSN, not the MSNA. Whatever you ultimately decide I would pass on the $40,00000 BSN now in favor of the ADN.
    Quote from d&d's mom
    Hi,

    I have been a lurker on this board for probably a year, and now find myself in need of advice from some of you. I have shadowed a CRNA for awhile, and I'm confident that this is the path I want to pursue. I have a degree in Biology and Chemistry with alot of other "hard core" science (GPA 3.7). My first step is to get an RN license, and here is where I have a dilemma. I've been accepted to a top five nursing school to complete a 2nd degree BSN at $40,000 for the program. Or I can apply to my local community college which has an accelerated ADN (completed in 1 year) for $5,000. Most of the CRNA schools I want to apply to only require that you have a bachelor's degree and an RN license. Would I hurt myself in the long-run to only get an ADN? Financially, I think I prefer not to get into so much debt before CRNA school.

    What is your advice? Thanks!

    woolfda
  9. 0
    Where did you do your BSN online? I am in a similar predicament and don't want to spend the $40,000 on a BSN when I will need all my cash and loan limits for CRNA school. Was the fact that your BSN was online a negative factor in anyway wiht adcoms?



    Quote from Trauma Tom
    I was in a similar situation. I went the ADN route and finshed in 15 months. I then went to work obtaining my ICU experience. While I was working I obtained my BSN on line and let my hospital pay for it. I agree with the advice about talking to program directors at schools you want to apply to. Keep in mind that without the BSN you are slightly limited as to where you can apply. In addition, if you ever want to teach at a program that awards the MSN, you need the MSN, not the MSNA. Whatever you ultimately decide I would pass on the $40,00000 BSN now in favor of the ADN.
  10. 0
    I can only address where I went to school, but at Newman University in Wichita, the only requirements were for a Bachelor's degree and an RN license. So, no need to get the BSN there. Bottom line is that I'd look at the schools you are considering as potentials to get your CRNA and ask the program directors what they expect.

    (Note: There is a difference between a school that grants an Master of Science in Nursing (anesthesia) and a Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia. Generally, the difference comes in about an extra semester in "nursing theory" courses and such. Given the amount of money that the extra semester of graduate school costs, and the amount of salary lost in having to take the extra semester of school, I'd need a REAL compelling reason not to pursue the MSNA. So, if the only reason you end up needing a BSN is because the school you want to go to grants an MSN and requires the BSN first, shop around.)

    Kevin McHugh, CRNA
  11. 0
    You guys have been great! Your recommendations have been in agreement with what I have been thinking all along. It's so nice to know that I can bounce ideas off of those that have "been there, done that". I really do appreciate all the help you lend!


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