DO (school) in anesthesiology or CRNA school - page 6

I am a new member. Discovered you guys about a year and a half ago and tap in every now and then and read discussions. Great site! Great discussions. I have a question I am hoping you can help me... Read More

  1. by   gaspazzer
    Quote from Brenna's Dad
    MDA residency is 4 years + fellowship = five.
    No. MDA is only a 4 year residency 91 year Intern and 3 years anesthesia). You are not required to do a fellowship.
  2. by   x_coastie
    [quote=Roland;702208]......... "Loving" your job is a luxery, and if it turns out that we love the job then that's truely a blessing. However, I believe this whole notion of "loving your work" is a modern notion grounded in "baby boomer", touchy "feel good" life perspectives..........
    .........Eighty percent of the world's population works desperately hard just to LIVE at jobs that would leave the average American shocked in horror after a couple of days.........
    ...........Some might even argue that the whole notion of promoting the concept of "doing what you love" is little more than a thinly veiled ploy by major coorporate interests to reduce demands for higher wages and benefits........
    ....... My own father preached to me as a child that I should understand that work isn't supposed to be fun because if it was they could get by with volunteers!

    Great post (especially your fathers preachings). I tend to think the same thing but this is the first time someone has gone against the popular "you have to love your job" theory. The entire idea of only doing the job you love is B.S. because who would collect trash or scrub toilets (both of which I have done because I needed money)? If you can find that perfect job, you are a truly blessed person. If not, humans can adapt to most anything if they are motivated.
    Take care
  3. by   I_am_Julia
    ditto to both you and roland. i've been saying this for years.


    [quote=x_coastie;2159761]
    Quote from roland
    ......... "loving" your job is a luxery, and if it turns out that we love the job then that's truely a blessing. however, i believe this whole notion of "loving your work" is a modern notion grounded in "baby boomer", touchy "feel good" life perspectives..........
    .........eighty percent of the world's population works desperately hard just to live at jobs that would leave the average american shocked in horror after a couple of days.........
    ...........some might even argue that the whole notion of promoting the concept of "doing what you love" is little more than a thinly veiled ploy by major coorporate interests to reduce demands for higher wages and benefits........
    ....... my own father preached to me as a child that i should understand that work isn't supposed to be fun because if it was they could get by with volunteers!

    great post (especially your fathers preachings). i tend to think the same thing but this is the first time someone has gone against the popular "you have to love your job" theory. the entire idea of only doing the job you love is b.s. because who would collect trash or scrub toilets (both of which i have done because i needed money)? if you can find that perfect job, you are a truly blessed person. if not, humans can adapt to most anything if they are motivated.
    take care
  4. by   suzanne4
    This thread is more than three years old, doubt if you will hear much from the original posters. Have not been around here in some time.
  5. by   lizzyberry
    CRNA school would be a quicker route
  6. by   core0
    Quote from Brenna's Dad
    MDA residency is 4 years + fellowship = five.
    Umm no allopathic or osteopathic residency is 3 years with an option for a fellowship or research.
    Here is a fairly typical program.

    http://depts.washington.edu/anesth/t...ts/index.shtml

    There are osteopathic programs about 9 of them. Not sure how competitive anesthesiology residency is for DO's.

    http://www.scutwork.com/cgi-bin/link...index.html&d=1
  7. by   catman21
    Look I think many of people are misinformed about the DO-A path, a residency in anesthesiology is not DO or MD specific.

    Allopathic(MD) and Osteopathic(DO) medicine both require a 4 year bachelor's degree, 4 years of medical school, and 4 years of internship + anesthesia residency (Postgrad year 1 + CA1/2/3).

    Both DO and MD graduates apply for the same residencies, there are no DO only anesthesiology residency nor are there MD only anesthesiology residencies. That being said, should you choose to go through DO schooling, I would strongly suggest you take you USMLE as well as the COMLEX.

    Currently residencies, like anesthesiology, that receive a large number of MD applicants will want to see your USMLE scores in order to compare you to your MD counterparts.

    But once you're a licensed anesthesiologist, you are an anesthesiologist. DO or MD doesn't matter at that point.
  8. by   core0
    Quote from catman21
    Look I think many of people are misinformed about the DO-A path, a residency in anesthesiology is not DO or MD specific.

    Allopathic(MD) and Osteopathic(DO) medicine both require a 4 year bachelor's degree, 4 years of medical school, and 4 years of internship + anesthesia residency (Postgrad year 1 + CA1/2/3).

    Both DO and MD graduates apply for the same residencies, there are no DO only anesthesiology residency nor are there MD only anesthesiology residencies. That being said, should you choose to go through DO schooling, I would strongly suggest you take you USMLE as well as the COMLEX.

    Currently residencies, like anesthesiology, that receive a large number of MD applicants will want to see your USMLE scores in order to compare you to your MD counterparts.

    But once you're a licensed anesthesiologist, you are an anesthesiologist. DO or MD doesn't matter at that point.
    I think that you have a poor understanding of the nuances of residency. Both Osteopathy and Allopathy have separate residencies. They are either intership (medicine, transitional, surgery or Tri (osteopathic)) plus three years of anesthesia residency or four years of integrated residency.

    Osteopathic residencies are only available to graduates of osteopathic programs. Here is a link to the AOA match:
    2012 Summary by Program Type
    There were 33 open anesthesia positions with 29 filled.

    The allopathic match occurs after the osteopathic match and is open to allopathic and osteopathic grads as well as foreign medical graduates.
    Here is a link to the NRMP match:
    NRMP: Residency Match

    Other things to remember is that some states require completion of an osteopathic internship to be licensed in the state. Some residencies are dual certified (osteopathic and allopathic) but most aren't. So completion of an allopathic residency will not allow an osteopath to practice in all states.

    Finally there is a proposal to limit allopathic fellowships to allopathic residency graduates. This will limit osteopathic residency options.

Must Read Topics


close