CRNA vs SRNA vs AA?

  1. 0
    dumb question, but what is the difference and what do these initials mean?

    i know crna is certified registered nurse anesthesist - but the others?

    thanks!
    topcat
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  4. 0
    SRNA = Student Registered Nurse Anesthetist
    AA = Anesthesia Assistant
  5. 0
    thank you! ok, now what is the difference in duties between a crna and an aa, if any?

    i am trying to more understand the arguments on this board and i simply do not know enough about either to understand why this is an issue.

    thanks!
    topcat
  6. 0
    topcat,

    ou just asked a question that's about to cause a sh*t storm.
  7. 0
    Quote from topcat1234
    thank you! ok, now what is the difference in duties between a crna and an aa, if any?

    i am trying to more understand the arguments on this board and i simply do not know enough about either to understand why this is an issue.

    thanks!
    topcat
    no flame-throwing please, just trying to provide a short outline of details that pertain to the question asked!

    crna and aa
    *both educated at level of master's degree
    *crna's are registered nurses (already licensed professionals) who have a minimum of one year of critical-care experience prior to entering their anesthesia education programs
    *aa's do not necessarily have to have any experience in healthcare prior to entering their anesthesia education programs, although i imagine healthcare experience would assist them in gaining entry into their programs (i believe there are only two such programs -- not sure?)
    *function is quite similar, although aa's must be directed by an anesthesiologist and crna's do not require medical supervision. for example, a crna could practice without an anesthesiologist being in-house, but an aa must have the anesthesiologist in-house in order to practice.
    *entry to both anesthesia education programs requires a strong background in the sciences (chemistry, biology, physiology, etc). requirements for crna programs vary greatly from school to school --- there are only 2 aa schools, so not a whole lot of room for variance there.

    bottom line - crna's are already experienced in dealing with the critically-ill patient as a licensed care provider, before ever beginning an anesthesia education program. nursing experience brings with it a deeper understanding of pathophysiology and co-morbidities than a general science undergraduate education...thus tipping the scales in favor of having a crna at the head of the or table, rather than an aa. that is what i would want for myself, for my loved ones, and for my patients. that is also why i hope to be a crna myself, someday.

    hope that helps!
  8. 0
    Quote from TeenyBabyRN
    No flame-throwing please, just trying to provide a short outline of details that pertain to the question asked!
    Quote from TeenyBabyRN

    CRNA and AA
    *Both educated at level of Master's degree
    *CRNA's are Registered Nurses (already licensed professionals) who have a minimum of one year of critical-care experience prior to entering their anesthesia education programs
    *AA's do not necessarily have to have any experience in healthcare prior to entering their anesthesia education programs, although I imagine healthcare experience would assist them in gaining entry into their programs (I believe there are only two such programs -- not sure?)
    *Function is quite similar, although AA's MUST be directed by an anesthesiologist and CRNA's do not require medical supervision. For example, a CRNA could practice without an anesthesiologist being in-house, but an AA must have the anesthesiologist in-house in order to practice.
    *Entry to both anesthesia education programs requires a strong background in the sciences (chemistry, biology, physiology, etc). Requirements for CRNA programs vary greatly from school to school --- there are only 2 AA schools, so not a whole lot of room for variance there.

    Bottom line - CRNA's are already experienced in dealing with the critically-ill patient as a licensed care provider, before ever beginning an anesthesia education program. Nursing experience brings with it a deeper understanding of pathophysiology and co-morbidities than a general science undergraduate education...thus tipping the scales in favor of having a CRNA at the head of the OR table, rather than an AA. That is what I would want for myself, for my loved ones, and for my patients. That is also why I hope to be a CRNA myself, someday.

    Hope that helps!


    WoW!!!



    Great explanation without any politics. My hat is to you TeenyBabyRN.
  9. 0
    now that i have a better understanding, i can critically review the threads here.

    thanks a bunch, teenybabyrn!
    topcat
  10. 0
    Quote from user69

    WoW!!!



    Great explanation without any politics. My hat is to you TeenyBabyRN.
    Long on editorials, a little shorter on facts.
    Last edit by jwk on May 22, '04
  11. 0
    Quote from jwk
    Long on editorials, a little shorter on facts.
    Hoping you were going to reply to to my post in billing question thread.
  12. 0
    Quote from trakstar
    Hoping you were going to reply to to my post in billing question thread.
    It's coming

    Been busy celebrating the TriCare victory and trying to stamp out fires in the Louisiana Legislature.

    I really do want to respond to your other post and answer your questions - I just tend to be a little long-winded, so I'm trying to shorten my response just a little..

    I would like to point something out though - Y'all have gone berserk:angryfire over the Vogue article, and rightfully so. I saw Dr. Abergel's website, and that immediately answered several questions in my mind (if you get my drift). But now maybe some of you at least can understand how us AA's felt after the Stars and Stripes ad last year.
    Last edit by jwk on Jun 3, '04


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