CRNA- is a strong science background really relevant towards being a CRNA

  1. 0
    I am almost finished receiving my Bachelor of Science in Nursing and it seems to me that the work of the CRNA is very intense; however how much does chemistry actually apply to the position. Its seems like the procedure is still the same to me as for registered nurses, check the doctors orders, have correct drug and dosage and monitor patient. The SRNA curriculum is very loaded with science. I just received a B in Chemistry (general organic and biochemistry). I want to know if someone is not to fond of science; howver loves critical care, should pursue becoming a CRNA.

    what is the daily routine of a CRNA and what knowledge must a CRNA have
  2. 7,341 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 23 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Quote from jessicanursing101
    Its seems like the procedure is still the same to me as for registered nurses, check the doctors orders, have correct drug and dosage and monitor patient.
    Before worrying about being a CRNA you should actually learn how CRNAs/APNs practice. You should start at AANA - Home
    and go from there.
  5. 2
    Quote from jessicanursing101
    check the doctors orders, have correct drug and dosage and monitor patient. The SRNA curriculum is very loaded with science.
    Yes, a strong science background is extremely relevant. There are no "doctors orders" to check, and actually as an ICU nurse it isn't as simple as that either. As a CRNA I must have an in depth understanding of the pharmacology of the drugs the patient is taking prior to presenting to surgery, as well as the drugs I choose to administer. I must also understand how the drugs will interact and impact normal physiology, and make adjustments based upon any specific pathophysiologic conditions the patient may have. There are also several important technical skills that must be mastered, airway management being one of the most important for example. Every time a patient is induced for a general anesthetic their ability to breath on their own is taken away. Then the CRNA must breath for them. So the CRNA must use specific judement to know the approprite techniques to implement and make split second decisions depending upon the patient's response. If I can't manage the airway within 5 minutes or so, the patient will be injured or die.
    And not every nurse who likes ICU will like anesthesia. The ICU experience is one important component, but it is not everything.
    ~FloridaCCRN~ and wtbcrna like this.
  6. 0
    Yup. Do some research on what a CRNA actually does. CRNA is an entirely different ballgame than RN. But to answer your original question, yes, a strong science background is necessary. The phys and pharm courses you will take in CRNA school will quickly make you realize that the physiology and pharmacology courses that you took in undergraduate school were very basic, barely scratching the surface courses.
  7. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    Before worrying about being a CRNA you should actually learn how CRNAs/APNs practice.
    Agreed. And work. And learn about critical care; even staff nursing isn't just checking drugs against a MAR.
  8. 0
    I already know about the practice. I already have done my research for about 2 years, however I have been unable to see how the science portion of the curriculum relates to the every day performance of the position since nurses do not prescribe or designate the anesthetic given.

    I am not worried about being a CRNA and nothin in my post has indicated that I am ignorant of the role.
  9. 0
    Quote from jessicanursing101
    nurses do not prescribe or designate the anesthetic given.

    ......nothin in my post has indicated that I am ignorant of the role.
    This statement indicates that you do not understand what a CRNA does. I 'designate' the anesthetic given for every patient I care for, and most CRNAs do unless they work in a very restrictive ACT practice. Where did you do your research? I'm curious as to how you have gotten such an inacurrate impression.

    Also I have tried to specifically describe to you why the sciences are important to my day to day practice. Obviously I have failed to convince you.
  10. 0
    Quote from jessicanursing101
    I already know about the practice. I already have done my research for about 2 years, however I have been unable to see how the science portion of the curriculum relates to the every day performance of the position since nurses do not prescribe or designate the anesthetic given.

    I am not worried about being a CRNA and nothin in my post has indicated that I am ignorant of the role.
    Actually, your whole OP shows that you are very ignorant of the role of being a CRNA.

    1. You didn't know that CRNAs do not work off of Doctor's orders. Which indicates that you don't understand how CRNAs practice.

    2. You ask why a science background is important in anesthesia which also indicates for someone that has done "2 years" of research doesn't have fundamental understanding of anesthesia.

    3. For example: You will need to know what receptors every drug you give works on, how each drug is metabolized, which drugs will interact with other drugs and to what degree, which drug to give/not to give in any particular scenario, how a person's pathophysiology is going to effect your anesthesia, have a basic understanding of physics/chemistry/physiology etc. just understand MAC/BG coefficient/second gas effect etc.

    So again I would suggest starting with AANA - Home
    and going over the very informative posts on what CRNAs do and how to become a CRNA.
  11. 1
    [quote=jessicanursing101;4465948] Its seems like the procedure is still the same to me as for registered nurses, check the doctors orders, have correct drug and dosage and monitor patient. quote]

    This is why people feel that you may be ignorant about the role of a CRNA.
    ~FloridaCCRN~ likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from jessicanursing101
    I already know about the practice. I already have done my research for about 2 years, however I have been unable to see how the science portion of the curriculum relates to the every day performance of the position since nurses do not prescribe or designate the anesthetic given.

    I am not worried about being a CRNA and nothin in my post has indicated that I am ignorant of the role.
    You're still trying to get into a fast track BSN program. You haven't even started nursing school yet. How would you know how a nurse or a CRNA practices? Yes, your science classes are important as the other posters have explained. Don't ask questions if you don't really want the answers. And if you think nurse anesthetists do not prescribe or designate the anesthetic given, you need to continue your "research".


Top