CRNA Program Requirements

  1. Hello! I have 2yrs experience in a CT ICU and was interested in CRNA school. The problem is my undergrad GPA is a 2.9, how strict our most programs about having a 3.0 GPA? Any advice on what I should do to make myself a more attractive candidate? Is it even possible to be accepted to a program with my GPA?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   SproutRN
    Quote from KLT
    Hello! I have 2yrs experience in a CT ICU and was interested in CRNA school. The problem is my undergrad GPA is a 2.9, how strict our most programs about having a 3.0 GPA? Any advice on what I should do to make myself a more attractive candidate? Is it even possible to be accepted to a program with my GPA?
    Unfortunately, I think you will have a difficult time getting accepted with your GPA. I got accepted with a 3.3 and an average GRE score and I know of one other classmate who had similar numbers to mine. 'Most program are very competitive and the average GPA's are pretty high.

    I think it would be a good idea to start taking some classes over to improve your grades. Any class you got a 'C' in needs to be taken again to hopefully make an 'A'. I took one class over and know others in my class who did the same.

    Best of luck to you.

    SproutRN
  4. by   NCgirl
    I don't know exactly what schools will take less than a 3.0, but my advice would be to take some graduate courses, maybe like org chem or biochem, or an adv. physiology. Make A's in whatever graduate courses you take, as to prove your capabilities of being successful at the graduate level. And be brutally honest as to how you ended up with a 2.9 in undergrad. Admission committees love honesty! Call around to the top schools you're interested in, and find out right from the get-go if they'd consider you, after taking some grad classes. I'd venture out on a limb and say it's about next to impossible to get in with a 2.9 if there's nothing else standing out. Also work on getting an awesome GRE score. The FAQ's at the top address this too, some really good advice in those. I'd say CRNA school is an option, if you have other qualities a school is looking for. Maybe there are people on the board with lower than 3.0 who can also offer some encouragement! Good luck!
  5. by   suzanne4
    Without retaking some of your classes, you will have a very hard time getting accepted at this point. There are many students with much better GPAs that are even having trouble getting into a program. I would definitely suggest that you go back and retake any class that you had a "C" in as stated by the above poster, but be aware that that won't guarantee you a spot. Esspecially if those "C" grades are in your core sciences.

    Good luck.................
  6. by   SRNAVic
    KLT,

    I had a 2.99 GPA when I applied at Rush U. I'm now in my very last two classes of didactic study as an SRNA and I have a 4.0 GPA. My program is a hybrid setup so I've been in the OR (this quarther 3 days a week) since last fall, the quarter after we start the program. The thing is, many schools use 3.0 as a cutoff point to weed out some marginal candidates. You have to realize that they look at many other characteristics that you have such as your GRE score, your admission application and essay, whether or not you worked while you were in undergrad (and how much you worked), personal issues you may have had, and, probably most importantly, your interview. Check out my post about admission essays I gave to Bigwalldave. Talk to a representative face to face and ask them to give you a course outline of required classes you can take before you apply for school. Also, shadow a CRNA for a day and let the people who admit you to school know that you did that, especially if the CRNA you shadow is a graduate of their school. The admissions board at essentially every school are looking for a whole package, not just a package of grades, and that is from one of the horses mouths, so to speak.

    Vic
  7. by   futuregaspasser
    Quote from SRNAVic
    KLT,

    whether or not you worked while you were in undergrad (and how much you worked),

    Vic
    Is working while an undergrad to your benefit, or against?
  8. by   SRNAVic
    I think it is to your benefit since it shows responsibility and prioritization/organization skills. I paid for my undergraduate work myself and I went to a private 4 year institution--believe me I worked my rear off!!! That definitely spoke to my work ethic. I drove cars that didn't always work and worked a ton of hours in a hospital and, believe it or not, I refereed tons of ice hockey. I think the refereeing part helps me with when I get pimped--it's like I'm pretty calm because I was used to coaches yelling at me all the time and performing under pressure in front of a lot of people.

    Vic

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