CRNA

  1. I am currently a junior in a BSN program, I am very interested in becoming a CRNA eventually. I understand acceptance into a program is very competitive. I am presently trying to maintain a high GPA to increase my chances of acceptance. Can anyone give me an idea of what kind of GPA is recommended and the amount of experience I will need in a critical care setting. Any other hints would be great!!
    Ben
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   crna2be
    Hi ben. My two cents, if you please.

    I was recently accepted into a CRNA program at Rush in Chicago. I have been a practicing critical care nurse for four years. Here are a few things to think about:

    have an intelligent and honest answer
    about why you want to pursue this--you
    may be asked to write an essay
    educate yourself about the CRNA role
    undergraduate--keep a 3.5 GPA
    GRE--get 1400-1500
    recommendations--from physicians in
    the critical care area and nurse managers.
    interview--IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT
    anyone can look good on paper, but it is
    how you carry yourself in the school interview that is key.
    ABOVE ALL--become an expert critical care nurse. This is the training you need. You can't do well in the OR, for example, if you don't know how to manage a crashing patient.

    If the graduate program you are applying to will allow you to take courses beforehand (like the general courses) do so, and do WELL in them. This is very helpful and looks very good--shows interest and motivation.

    My advice comes from personal experience of colleagues who have/have not gotten in and information from CRNAs that I know at work.

    Good luck L
  4. by   mhenning8
    Everything stated here is good. Also, always remember to ask "why am I doing this" not just "Dr. what do you want me to do"!!Real important. There are many nurses, even in Critical care that do things out of habit, do things because "he told me to" or "that's the way we have always done it"!! When you are a CRNA, or a CRNA student these answers will get you out the door in a hurry!! You must KNOW the pathophysiology of your patient, how the disease process is affecting normal physiology, and you must know the pharmacology, dosing, action of the medication, what receptors it is acting upon, etc. Spend time in the OR with a CRNA not for a day but for many days over a period of time.. this also looks good to an interview committee. It is a career and schooling process that will be very tough, physically and mentally, but if you are determined you can do it!!

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