Can a CRNA become a............

  1. 0
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
  2. 12 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I am wanting to become a crna, and I talked to a dr. of anesthesiology, and he said the difference is dr. go for four years a medical school, plus another four years in their specialty. All we do is go the extra two year for our MA. Hope that helps.
    Quote from hocke5716
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
  4. 0
    Quote from hocke5716
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
    An anesthesiologist is a doctor. You need to go to medical school, there are no shortcuts or "bridge programs", nor is becomming a CRNA a shortcut in any way. They are two distinct professions. Search the forums here, I'm sure that your questions relating to job descriptions will be answered. Good luck!

    Blee
  5. 0
    Quote from hocke5716
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
    Yes they can...it's called medical school. 4 years of med school, followed by 4 years residency, and you are an anesthesiologist. The only other a CRNA can do is practice as a RN,


    Rob
  6. 0
    Quote from hocke5716
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
    Hey...the CRNA would have to gain entry to Medical School and then complete an ANESTH residency (6 years I think) in order to become a MD Gasser.
  7. 0
    Quote from PoppaD
    Hey...the CRNA would have to gain entry to Medical School and then complete an ANESTH residency (6 years I think) in order to become a MD Gasser.
    Anesthesia residency is only 3 years plus 1 transitional year. So, 4 years.
  8. 0
    Quote from hocke5716
    This may be a stupid question but here goes,

    Can a CRNA become an anesthesiologist, is there schooling for this,

    Technically they do the same job correct.

    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.


    Thanks for any help.
    As the others said, you can go to medical school if you want. My physician said there were 2 CRNA's in his class when he went to medical school.
  9. 0
    Quote from hocke5716
    If a person did become a crna are they stuck doing that for good or is there anything else that would relate to it without having wasted the prior schooling.

    I know of ZERO CRNAs who feel like they are stuck in a job forever that they do not like. No CRNA ever wants to give up anesthesia. It just doesn't happen.

    Of course, there are ways to build on your career, and advance in your profession.

    You can become active in your state association, run for office, become state president.

    You can develop your management skills, and become chief of your department. You can become an entrepreneur and start your own business.

    You can teach nurse anesthesia students, clinically in the operating room, or as a didactic classroom instructor.

    You can participate in research activities. You can advance your education by earning a doctorate degree.

    If you think nurse anesthesia is a dead end job, you do not have a realistic picture of it. Wait until you get there, to see what you really think.

    I entered nurse anesthesia because I was tired of the same old thing, and I wanted new challenges. That was several decades ago, and I still feel just as excited and stimulated by my work as I did when I started.

    With all these opportunities, why would I even consider changing paths to enter medicine? If I wanted that, I would have done it in the first place.

    loisane crna
  10. 0
    i know some crna who have gone on to med school and then gone on to become anesthesiologists. One person specifically said she did it because back in the days, the docs took the larger cut for the same work and she wanted a fair share of the deal. I don't know the reason's for the others. Most of it seem to be the compensation.
    In terms of training, i know that in some institutions where they have crna's and md students, they are taught by the same instructors. i know some crna's teach med students as well.
  11. 0
    My advice is, if you want to be a doctor , go to medical school. If you want to do anesthesia go to crna school. By the time you go to med sch and then residency you are no less than 8 years out. If you know you want to do anesthesia then go the crna route, thats only 2 years. Now you have 6 years of good income to invest wisely and you would be so much farther ahead financially that it would take a minimum of 10 years post residency to just to catch up as a anesthesiologist.

    If it is knowledge that you are looking for, then its medical school. But once in medical school you have so many choices as to career paths that there is no guarantees you will choose anesthesia. And anesthesia is one of the more competetive fields currently, so there is another twist to the game. And then once you are done with anesthesia residency you have more choices to make. Pain management, critical care, private practice, academics, etc. I sort of long winded with this but you get the picture, I'm sure. There are no dead ends once you have an education.


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