Becoming a CRNA - From One Who Did It - page 12

Looking over this bulletin board, I noticed that there were few CRNA's posting, and a large number of people interested in becoming CRNA's posting. There seem to be a lot of questions. I had a lot... Read More

  1. by   loisane
    Let me also welcome Mike to the board. Input from experienced CRNAs is always welcome here.

    Mike, I hear what you are saying. I have worked with many fine CRNAs who did not have an ICU background. But that was then. Now is now, and times have changed. Let me tell you some reasons for the change.

    Since you are interested in this, maybe you have participated in admission decisions for a program. I have sat on some of these committee meetings, and the view you present is held by many clinical representatives. But we only see a part of the picture.

    The council on certification keeps detailed statistics on graduates taking that exam. These are available to programs. This means it is possible to determine some of the factors that predict a success on the certification exam. Guess what previous nursing experience rises to the top every time? Yep, ICU. You can look back for years. ICU nurses consistently make higher scores and have a greater percentage of passing than any other type of experience.

    Now does that mean that non-ICU nurse always fail? Absolutely not. Many do very well in school, and on boards. But programs have many more times applicants than available spots. It is only logical to fill those spots with the people that you think will have the most chance for success.

    So why don't we make ICU an accreditation requirement, and limit programs to those applicants? Then we really would be closing the door to those non-ICU nurses that would make good CRNAs. That is why the national requirement does not specify. It gives programs the flexibility to make these decisions on an individual basis.

    But the reality is, for applicants now, in order to maximize your chance of acceptance, ICU experience is an excellent idea. Without it, you are really limiting your chance of success.

    Kudos to you for pursuing your PhD. We have a great need for that in nursing and in anesthesia. And I agree, this would be a great subject for study. Then we could have more knowledge on which to make these difficult decisions.

    loisane crna
  2. by   Trauma Tom
    Loisane CRNA

    We can always count on you to offer wisdom based upon your years of anesthesia practice. Thanks for shedding some additional light on this requirement.
    Quote from loisane
    Let me also welcome Mike to the board. Input from experienced CRNAs is always welcome here.

    Mike, I hear what you are saying. I have worked with many fine CRNAs who did not have an ICU background. But that was then. Now is now, and times have changed. Let me tell you some reasons for the change.

    Since you are interested in this, maybe you have participated in admission decisions for a program. I have sat on some of these committee meetings, and the view you present is held by many clinical representatives. But we only see a part of the picture.

    The council on certification keeps detailed statistics on graduates taking that exam. These are available to programs. This means it is possible to determine some of the factors that predict a success on the certification exam. Guess what previous nursing experience rises to the top every time? Yep, ICU. You can look back for years. ICU nurses consistently make higher scores and have a greater percentage of passing than any other type of experience.

    Now does that mean that non-ICU nurse always fail? Absolutely not. Many do very well in school, and on boards. But programs have many more times applicants than available spots. It is only logical to fill those spots with the people that you think will have the most chance for success.

    So why don't we make ICU an accreditation requirement, and limit programs to those applicants? Then we really would be closing the door to those non-ICU nurses that would make good CRNAs. That is why the national requirement does not specify. It gives programs the flexibility to make these decisions on an individual basis.

    But the reality is, for applicants now, in order to maximize your chance of acceptance, ICU experience is an excellent idea. Without it, you are really limiting your chance of success.

    Kudos to you for pursuing your PhD. We have a great need for that in nursing and in anesthesia. And I agree, this would be a great subject for study. Then we could have more knowledge on which to make these difficult decisions.

    loisane crna
  3. by   mwbeah
    Tom,

    I am a CRNA my friend, just wanted to make sure you understood that.


    Mike
    Last edit by mwbeah on Nov 3, '04
  4. by   mwbeah
    Hey everybody I am not trying to stir the pot or tick anyone off...I apologize if I have. But if you have been following this discussion you could clearly see the hostility that followed my initial post so the debate began.

    Look, I understand both points of view and kudos to the point made about shutting down the avenue completely to non-ICU nurses. I am just trying to get everyone to think outside of the box and realize that some really strong potential applicants lie outside the critical care arena.

    The only reason that I offered my background was to prove that point.

    Thanks,
    Mike

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