As a CRNA, Can You Still Pick Up RN Shifts?

  1. I'm curious if, as a CRNA, you are still allowed to pick up bedside shifts as an RN? I know, you might say, why would you want to do that, you make more as a CRNA. But to have variety in work and keep up bedside skills (NGs, foleys, person-to-person interaction, etc.) I
    think it would be nice if I was able to become a CRNA and then pick up a shift here and there in the ER or ICU.

    As a CRNA, are you restricted from performing the role of a bedside RN? Thoughts?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from CSUSM10
    I'm curious if, as a CRNA, you are still allowed to pick up bedside shifts as an RN? I know, you might say, why would you want to do that, you make more as a CRNA. But to have variety in work and keep up bedside skills (NGs, foleys, person-to-person interaction, etc.) I
    think it would be nice if I was able to become a CRNA and then pick up a shift here and there in the ER or ICU.

    As a CRNA, are you restricted from performing the role of a bedside RN? Thoughts?
    Yes, you could do that, but you would not be held to the standards of an RN but a CRNA and the money would likely be a lot less. So my question would be if you want to continue working as an RN after becoming a CRNA, then why even become a CRNA?. It sounds like you haven't made up your mind that you want to be a CRNA yet. Have you spent time shadowing CRNAs, especially independent CRNAs? I don't place foleys, but OGs/NGs are common and I interact with patients all the time. I don't spend a lot time with patients, but when I work OB or the preop clinic I spend quite a bit of time with patients.

    http://www.aana.com/resources2/profe...20as%20RNs.pdf
    Last edit by wtbcrna on May 24
  4. by   Double-Helix
    I agree with wtbcrna that it may create conflicts between your license and your job description. Similar to an RN working as a CNA, you are held to the standard of your highest licensure. So if you're in the ER and a patient needs an advanced airway, as a CRNA you might want to throw in an LMA. But your facility may not allow RNs to perform this skill, and you're being employed as an RN. It gets tricky.
  5. by   CSUSM10
    Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!
  6. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from CSUSM10
    Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!
    You would more than likely have been not working as an RN for 3 years while going through anesthesia school, and you would still be held to a higher standard than an RN.
    It sounds like you haven't made up your mind that you want to be CRNA yet. Why don't you spend some more time shadowing different CRNAs in different kinds of practices to see if that is what you really want to do.
  7. by   CCRN_CSC_0710
    I have no desire to place Foley's anymore, but in clinical I inserted more NGs (not counting OGs) in my first month than I did in 5 years as a CVICU RN. The skills you use as a CRNA are so much different (and more advanced) than the skills you use as a RN. I'll gladly lose my ability to insert a Flexiseal if that means I can insert epidurals.
  8. by   NeoMurse
    Quote from CSUSM10
    Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!
    You could pick up shifts as an RN before you are credentialed as a CRNA. However, if you went to CRNA school without picking up any shifts, most hospitals might refuse to hire you since you would have gone greater than 2 years without bedside experience.

    I knew a nurse who continued to work in the ICU while in CRNA school and picked up shifts while studying for her boards. She failed on her first try. My advice is study for boards after graduation, pass your boards, and then party your ass off. Go backpacking in Europe, South America, or wherever you've always wanted to travel.

    If you don't party then volunteer for your favorite charity. Once credentialed, stick to your lane as a CRNA. You will have plenty of time to interact with patients. Don't forget preop and postop interviews and you can spend time rounding on patients on the floors. Ugh! You can place a foley if you want... just ask the OR circulator. Like others have said... intubations, OG/NG placement, epidurals, spinals, nerve blocks are so much more fun than placing a foley catheter.

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