Any CRNA have a NP degree?

  1. Just wondering.

    I'm starting an MSN CRNA school next year....since the core nursing classes transfer I was thinking about getting my FNP after the CRNA.


    The reason is, my wife and I are going to be working for an NGO in Africa or possibly Haiti long term/career after I graduate , and I'd like to be as flexible as possible.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Dolce
    I worked with someone a few years ago who had been a FNP for 10 years before becoming a CRNA. I think she was one of those "lifetime learners" who can't stay out of college. She was probably one of the smartest nurses I've ever met. I thought her experience as a NP really gave her a great background as a CRNA.
  4. by   deepz
    Somewhere among the 36,000 CRNAs in America (and around the globe, thanks to the military, the NGOs, etc) you could probably, I imagine, find just about every type of degree offered anywhere -- MD, JD, MBA, PhD in u-name-it, Divinity, acupuncture, hypnotherapy, and yes ... NP of all stripes.

    Go for it.

    As to service in Africa:

    http://www.gaspasser.com/BudBusby.html
  5. by   Rage
    I know that in Florida if you have a CRNA you can sit for the NP exam license. No more schooling required.
  6. by   MaleAPRN
    I was a FNP for several years until I decided to become a CRNA too. Best thing I ever did! I don't regret the path I took at all. The experience I had as an NP carried over to help me train as a nurse anesthetist. I accepted a position back in August for a CRNA job in a rural hospital in New England and will also have a vast opportunity to utilize my FNP in that same area once I establish myself as a CRNA in the area. I say GO FOR IT if your gut tells you to do it.

    Goodluck.

    Vince
  7. by   EricJRN
    Quote from Rage
    I know that in Florida if you have a CRNA you can sit for the NP exam license. No more schooling required.
    Which type of NP would the CRNA become?
  8. by   Burnt2
    Thanks for the responses, guys. Thats the plan for right now...Case Western's FNP program is online, so I'd be able to do it and work at Cleveland Clinic as a CRNA (or so I hope, anyways)
  9. by   Rage
    Here is the link to Barry University: http://www.barry.edu/anesthesiology/curriculum.htm

    Here is the information:Upon successful completion of the curriculum, graduates are eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination for nurse anesthetists and are eligible for licensure as an advanced practice professional nurse by the State Boards of Nursing in the state in which the graduate seeks to practice. Upon completion of certification and licensure requirements, graduates attain the professional credentials of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) and Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP in Florida or similar terminology used in other states).

    So Eric to answer the question you asked I'd say a ARNP
  10. by   meandragonbrett
    ARNP is the title given to Advanced Practice RN's in the state of FL. Similar to some states giving the title APRN or APN. The CRNA does not hold nurse practitioner certification in the capacity to practice as a nurse practitioner.
  11. by   Rage
    Interesting since this government site http://www.nh.gov/nhes/elmi/licertoccs/nursarnp.htm defines ARNP as:

    [FONT=Verdana,Arial,helvetica,geneva]Description
    [FONT=Verdana,Arial,helvetica,geneva]An Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) is a Registered Nurse (RN) qualified to function independently. May perform physical examinations and diagnostic tests, develop and carry out treatment programs, or counsel patients. May prescribe medications noted in formulary. Specialty areas include: Nurse Midwife, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Ob/Gyn Nurse Practitioner, Adult Nurse Practitioner, Geriatric Nurse Practitioner, School Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric/Mental Health Specialist, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Emergency Room/Trauma Nurse Practitioner, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist.

    but then what do I know..........
  12. by   Burnt2
    Quote from meandragonbrett
    ARNP is the title given to Advanced Practice RN's in the state of FL. Similar to some states giving the title APRN or APN. The CRNA does not hold nurse practitioner certification in the capacity to practice as a nurse practitioner.
    I would tend to agree.

    I read rage's link, i'm not so sure that ARNP can be used to imply that the CRNA could then switch over and work ED as a nurse practitioner.

    From what I got from that ARNP/APN is a broad term used to describe all APNs, under which NP's and CRNA's fall together, as rage stated.

    However, i would imagine that nurse practitioners have a different skillset to deal with their patient population. There is some crossover, but not a whole lot.
  13. by   meandragonbrett
    Many states issue ARNP/APN licenses as a way to separate the license to practice advanced practice nursing and the license to practice nursing. If you lose your ARNP/APN license you don't necessarily lose your RN license and are still able to work as an RN.

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