Anesthesologist and CRNA collaboration - page 3

i've been a lurker on this board for about a year now; not particularly active in participation, but more active in soaking up knowledge from others as i start my nursing career. i'm interested... Read More

  1. by   deepz
    Quote from paindoc
    There is no reply necessary ........I used to be an anesthesiologist ..........
    Of course paindoc won't stoop to a dialogue, prefers to lecture, but I'm curious nevertheless -- why'd he quit anesthesia? Sounds like a bit of history we'd all be able to learn from.

    ??

    d
  2. by   paindoc
    Ahhhh great question! I started the anesthesia section of a liver transplant program, was involved in more than 20,000 anesthetics, and had extensive experience in neuroanesthesia. I became bored with anesthesia....it is too easy. It can be a great career for some, but when you hit homeruns everytime you step up to the plate, there is no challenge any longer. Chronic pain treatment, unlike OR anesthesiology, does not have such success rates. The diagnostic skills needed, skills to run a business in which patients are not simply fed to you, and therapeutic options are vastly more complex than anesthesiology. Whereas being in an OR chained to an anesthesia machine without control of your lifestyle may appeal to some anesthesiologists, it does not appeal to me. Most CRNAs have a great life delivering anesthesia and have decent working hours. As a pain physician, I select which patients I desire to see, which insurances I deem valuable enough in which to participate, the style of practice, determine who works for me, determine my exact and predictable hours of business, and what surgical and medical treatments I desire to offer. Lovin' it!!
  3. by   dfk
    Quote from deepz
    Of course paindoc won't stoop to a dialogue, prefers to lecture, but I'm curious nevertheless -- why'd he quit anesthesia?
    why?? because it's a job, it sux and it's a JOB that you hate to love and love to hate.. aside from the fact that you get tired of looking at peeps' rotten teeth and nasty breath, even thru the 'impenetrable' masks that are so graciously provided for the givers of gassss ... !!!
  4. by   CavemanCRNA
    MDA's and CRNA's can work together to provide the best posible patient care. In our practice, we put aside our political views when we enter the OR. The MDA and CRNA each recognize the other's role and respect each other's expertise and skill. In the outside world we sometimes interact socially but it is brief. Until the ASA and AANA can come together and work out their differences, there will be underlying tension between the two providers.
  5. by   subee
    Quote from paindoc
    Ahhhh great question! I started the anesthesia section of a liver transplant program, was involved in more than 20,000 anesthetics, and had extensive experience in neuroanesthesia. I became bored with anesthesia....it is too easy. It can be a great career for some, but when you hit homeruns everytime you step up to the plate, there is no challenge any longer. Chronic pain treatment, unlike OR anesthesiology, does not have such success rates. The diagnostic skills needed, skills to run a business in which patients are not simply fed to you, and therapeutic options are vastly more complex than anesthesiology. Whereas being in an OR chained to an anesthesia machine without control of your lifestyle may appeal to some anesthesiologists, it does not appeal to me. Most CRNAs have a great life delivering anesthesia and have decent working hours. As a pain physician, I select which patients I desire to see, which insurances I deem valuable enough in which to participate, the style of practice, determine who works for me, determine my exact and predictable hours of business, and what surgical and medical treatments I desire to offer. Lovin' it!!

    Is there any use for a CRNA without prescriptive privileges in a chronic pain practice. I'd like to segue over to chronic pain for my older age career but see no future in it without prescriptive privileges. But nor would I want to become someone else's prescription writing machine. CP would be a challenging area for me - at least intellectually so.

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