Advice question follow up

  1. This is following up that previous post on ICU experience years and those who were accepted into their respective programs with just 1-2 years ICU straight out of nursing school. My question to them and to anyone else in or just beginning a program is what was your GPA?(science courses GPA? nursing courses GPA? overall GPA?). I'm in a diploma RN program now but I have my BS in Biochemistry and hope to get into ICU unit when I'm done with school and eventually into an NA program. In the conversations I've had with staff CRNA in the hospital I'm in school at(one of them being the associate director of the NA program), they've all stressed high grades. But what is high? Are the science courses(A&P, chems, physics) taken more into consideration than nursing courses? Would having a biochem background help at all? These posts are very helpful....the advice and comments have been great....thanks.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   jbro
    my gpa was only a 3.2 overall, but i scored high on my gre and did good on the interview, they look at everything not just grades, although having good grades is a plus
  4. by   UCDSICURN
    It's the total package. Good grades are good but you have to have a good total package. Good experience, competetive GRE scores, good grades, a good interview, certs such as CCRN & TNCC. It's not all about grades it's the total package and how strong the applicant pool is that year.

    To directly respond to your question, science courses are highly stressed, that's why they give your science portion it's own GPA. I'd say your science GPA is the most important out of all of them, but you must maintain a 3.0 overall (For most programs) to be eligible, some can even waive this on a case by case basis.

    As far as already having a biochem degree, that's great. Will it help? It could, it could also hinder you. If you just squeaked by with say a "C" average, I'd guess that would be more of a hinderance then helpful. If you aced your biochem courses, then my hat's off to ya and I'd say it would definately be helpful.

    The bottom line is you want to be competitive in all areas that I mentioned above.

    Hope this helps,

    Donn C.
  5. by   TJCRN
    Does every NA program require GRE? The hospital that I'm at now has its own NA program in conjuction with an area university and I cant seem to find where GRE are required. I know thats usually on the university end to get into a Masters level program, but is it possible for GRE not to be required?
  6. by   CRNAStudent
    I know some schools don't require it if you graduated within a certain number of years. Mine required either the GRE or MAT.
  7. by   TraumaNurse
    TJCRN,

    I think there are about 8 schools that do not require GRE (don't quote me on that!) I know UMDNJ has not required it in the past but does as of this year so the list may be down to 7 or so. Hope this helps.
  8. by   gaspassah
    kaiser in pasadena does not require a gre or mat
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  9. by   louloubell1
    Quote from TJCRN
    This is following up that previous post on ICU experience years and those who were accepted into their respective programs with just 1-2 years ICU straight out of nursing school. My question to them and to anyone else in or just beginning a program is what was your GPA?(science courses GPA? nursing courses GPA? overall GPA?). I'm in a diploma RN program now but I have my BS in Biochemistry and hope to get into ICU unit when I'm done with school and eventually into an NA program. In the conversations I've had with staff CRNA in the hospital I'm in school at(one of them being the associate director of the NA program), they've all stressed high grades. But what is high? Are the science courses(A&P, chems, physics) taken more into consideration than nursing courses? Would having a biochem background help at all? These posts are very helpful....the advice and comments have been great....thanks.
    I was accepted with right around a year and a half experience. Overall GPA was 3.91, science and nursing courses 4.0. I think I interviewed very well, and I made sure that I had awesome references from both supervisors and from a couple of past professors (one a nursing professor and one an A&P professor). I didn't take the GRE, since the only school to which I applied did not require it, and though I had intended to take the CCRN before applying I decided to apply a year earlier than my original plan so I had not yet sat for the exam. As far as whether nursing courses are considered less than science courses, well I can't say for sure since I don't sit on an admissions committee, but I would have to think that it sort of depends. I mean getting a C in a nursing course like pharmacology or advanced med surg is a little different than getting a C in a nursing course like professionalism or nursing theorists, at least in my opinion. I would think that having a biochem degree could be helpful, but as another poster mentioned, I guess it could hurt too depending on your GPA for that program. One of my coworkers has a degree in biochem and then did a fasttrack BSN program for his nursing degree. He got turned down by a couple of schools this year, but was admitted to another one. Another of my coworkers has had trouble getting in because he lacks a BSN, though he has a masters in another field.

    Good luck to you in your endeavor!!

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