1st CRNA position

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    Has anybody taken there 1st CRNA position in a rural setting? If so, how was your experience? Are you glad you did? Would you have done anything different? I am currently a SRNA and am wondering how clinically prepared will I be upon graduation? I am debating on working in a bigger facility versus a smaller facility. There is a lot of pressure to sign contracts right now, just not feeling like I should. Any advice would be great!

    Thanks,
    SRNADaisy

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  2. 8 Comments...

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    I did, steep learning curve. I do not think I could ever work in a medically directed practice now, the few times I have as a locums I hated it. You are only allowed to be as good as your attending. As for me would not change my job.
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    So, should I not rule out my local hospitals after graduation. What kind of back up did you have in this position? What did you do to climb that steep learning curve?

    Thanks,
    SRNADaisy
  5. 0
    My first (and current) position is in a rural hospital with 2 of us. I found it not too hard to transition to a rural envirionment your program should teach you to function independently. My biggest learning issues were regional anesthesia. I didn't get a huge amount of blocks in school so my partner and othe locum CRNAs would teach me. There are many times right out of school where my partner was on vacation or working locums and I was by myself for the week. I wouldn't change a thing if I could go back and do it again. I work a lot of locums and I either work solo positions or I work in a CRNA only practice. Not sure if I could function very well in an ACT model or if I would even want to try. The nice thing about the rural environment is a better lifestyle, a lot more money and less working hours. the only draw back is the call. I don't mind call so for me it is not a big deal except for all the BS calls I get because the RNs can't place an IV to save their life. Any more questions PM me
  6. 0
    I would hesitate to take a rural position right out of school. I think you still have a lot to learn at that point (I know I did) and working in a larger facility can get you the kind of experience you need to go work solo in a rural area. I did have a friend that took a rural position right out of school but she had a really strenuous clinical phase and was probably a lot more experienced coming out of school than I was.
  7. 0
    all programs should prepare you to function in an independent capacity.
  8. 0
    Quote from CRNA2007
    all programs should prepare you to function in an independent capacity.
    "Should" being the operative word. I wonder just how independent one can become when the training is all under ACT. Or when you're competing with residents for experiences. Satisfying the minimum requirements isn't going to leave one comfortable doing all kinds of blocks and lines on their own. It's early yet, but I don't see the training I'm getting as preparing me to do all that on my own without backup.
  9. 0
    I know what you mean by the regional experiences. I only had one rural sight where i was able to place epidurals both labor and steroids. Only had about 25 spinals before I graduated and no block experience. The AANA does offer a course in regional anesthesia that is very good. I was fortuante to have a partner in my practice that has exceptional regional skills and has taught me well. You need to find some rural areas to practice in your program in order to get more experience. That was one of my main concerns when I applied to my program and I asked questions. It's really up to the individual to ensure if you want to work rural as a new grad that you research the schools before starting. Talk to current students at the program and get their insight.




    Quote from Class2011
    "Should" being the operative word. I wonder just how independent one can become when the training is all under ACT. Or when you're competing with residents for experiences. Satisfying the minimum requirements isn't going to leave one comfortable doing all kinds of blocks and lines on their own. It's early yet, but I don't see the training I'm getting as preparing me to do all that on my own without backup.
  10. 0
    Unfortunately, talking to current students didn't work for me. In retrospect, I think they did not speak plainly for fear of it getting back to their program directors. The best are recent graduates because they have more perspective, but even they may be reluctant to speak due to the ever present warning "anesthesia is a small community"


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