RN-BSN or ADN-Frontier Bridge?

  1. 0 I am completing my prereqs in the spring and am trying to figure the best option for me. I had planned to get my ADN and then get into the Frontier bridge program. Now I have applied for a job at a hospital and chances are high that I will get the position. This hospital is a teaching hospital and they have a diploma nursing program that they will completely cover the cost of if I work for them for a set number of years after graduation. Right now I am covered under a partial Pell Grant that covers my tuition for my ADN program, but that could change as my income level changes.

    I guess the question is, which option would be better for getting accepted to Frontier or another CNM program? Thanks for your insight.
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  3. Visit  kalley profile page

    About kalley

    From 'Western PA'; Joined Aug '08; Posts: 165; Likes: 49.

    18 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  SiennaGreen profile page
    0
    I have considered this also.

    From my viewpoint, currently, I am going ADN and then likely will go to work for the large teaching hospital allowing them to pay for my RN to BSN before attempting to move into the CNM program. Frontier is my preference. I think I will want to have some experiance in the hospital prior to Grad school and if I can get the RN to BSN free, why pay for the bridge at Frontier? (not cheap) Unfortunately, I am not eligible for Pell grants b/c of my previous BS degree and DH makes too much money to qualify for most need based grants. The above plan will work out just fine though. Hopefully when the time comes for Grad school, I will be in a position to gain some financial assistance either from work or a gov't grant at that time.

    Good luck!
  5. Visit  RNLaborNurse4U profile page
    1
    The bridge year at Frontier is only $8000. It's, in my opinion, much much cheaper than paying for a 2 year education to get your BSN!
    JrRnNycole likes this.
  6. Visit  SiennaGreen profile page
    0
    Yes, I'm sure it depends on individual situations.

    In my case, the RN to BSN is only two semesters and is completely funded by the hospital-tuition to books. Plus, I have the option of completing it 100% online- should I choose.

    In addition, the Frontier bridge will NOT provide you with a BSN degree. I know for most people, this is irrelevant but some gov't agencies which reimburse tuition for service, require the BSN in addition to the MSN. (Don't ask why...I have no clue. beauracracy.) Plus, if one wants the option to practice in a foreign country, many also require the BSN and won't recognize the Masters level training without it. (or you may have to jump through numerous hoops or complete additional training in said country prior to licensing)

    Just more stuff to think about.
  7. Visit  Smark35 profile page
    0
    I am a Frontier student and think they are a great school. However, free is free. As long as the program you're choosing is accredited, why pay for the whole think when you can get a portion for free? Get your BSN, and then apply to Frontier.
  8. Visit  mom2michael profile page
    1
    Sienna

    If you already have a previous Bachelor degree in anything, Frontier will accept you in the MSN program w/o a BSN. You have to take a Stats class and a PA class thru an approved school (or thru them) and submit a portfolio that outlines your experience. You can bypass the entire BSN if you so desire.

    In fact, Frontier will not even accept you into the ADN-MSN program if you have a previous Bachelor degree.

    That is what I'm doing. I took my two "pre-reqs" this term and I have been accepted directly into the MSN program to start in April. There was no need for me to get another B.S. degree because in the end it will be irrelevant to me.

    But if you so desire your BSN and you can get it paid for, then by all means that is what I would go for . I just no longer qualified for undergrad loans so getting a BSN would've been a total out of pocket expense for me and not worth the $$$$ in the end.

    And as far as the gov't loans, tuition reimbursement, I spent a great deal of time checking this out after hearing the rumor I would have to have a BSN first. Is there a program in particular you are thinking of that requires the BSN first? All the ones I checked into and corresponded with didn't seem to care if one had a BSN or not, they were concerned about the MSN and it coming from an accredited school.
    SiennaGreen likes this.
  9. Visit  mom2michael profile page
    0
    Quote from kalley
    I am completing my prereqs in the spring and am trying to figure the best option for me. I had planned to get my ADN and then get into the Frontier bridge program. Now I have applied for a job at a hospital and chances are high that I will get the position. This hospital is a teaching hospital and they have a diploma nursing program that they will completely cover the cost of if I work for them for a set number of years after graduation. Right now I am covered under a partial Pell Grant that covers my tuition for my ADN program, but that could change as my income level changes.

    I guess the question is, which option would be better for getting accepted to Frontier or another CNM program? Thanks for your insight.
    Yes, I agree, free is free. All roads will eventually lead you to where you want to be in life. Just make sure all your programs are properly accredited and you should be good to go.

    One thing to consider is how hard will it be to go from diploma RN to BSN? The other thing to consider, do you want to work for said employer for X amount of years no matter what? Life happens and sometimes there are things beyond our control that might cause us to have to move or make different choices in life. If you leave will that hinder your education (or stop the process) and will you have to pay back all this money to them?

    Good luck in whatever you decide!!!!
  10. Visit  SiennaGreen profile page
    0
    That is really interesting news re: going directly into the MSN. I'll have to mull that over and see what possibilities it opens up.

    I am very interested in working overseas, possibly relocating temporarily or longer to New Zealand, Canada, maybe somewhere EU. We want to pursue some type of aid work or missions work, but I really want to option of doing paid work in case we need to have an income. This was one of the scenarios that the BSN also was strongly preferred. Without it, it sounded like I would need to do portfolio and it might take longer or get caught in red tape.

    The domestic agency I believe wants the BSN was IHS. I was looking at ways to get out of debt if we needed to fund my CNM through loans, and IHS was a good way to do so while learning valuable skills in an underserved and culturally different environment. If you have other infornation re: IHS, I would be very interested. I spoke with a woman at HQ in MD but she may not have had the correct information, it happens!

    Thanks so much for the info!
  11. Visit  mom2michael profile page
    0
    I think it's awesome you want to travel overseas!!!! What a value you will be to the women of countries abroad.

    All the info I could dig up on IHS only made reference to an MSN and graduation from an accredited program. I also looked at the program to help off set my costs post graduation. I won't be in a position to move anywhere IHS sees fit to put me but for those that are fluid in their travels, it would be excellent!!! Anyway, I also spoke to someone out of the OK City office and they said you needed to be a MSN prepared nurse and graduated from an accredited program in the US to qualify.

    I think there is some confusion/controversy over direct entry MSN programs where one goes from no nursing experience to an MSN program to graduating with an Advance Practice Degree with minimal time as an RN. Those have proven to be a bit of a "hot topic" for obvious reason. There is a difference though, from what I can gather, about a ADN-MSN program and a direct entry MSN program.

    There are several other schools (not just Frontier) that offer an alternative entry option for those who do not want a BSN or for those that already have a previous B.S. degree. I found many in my searches for the perfect school.

    In your case and your desires to travel a BSN would make more sense.

    That is what is so great about nursing, so many options for all of us out there
  12. Visit  CNM-to-be profile page
    1
    The ADN Bridge Program...hands down!

    I finished the Bridge in May and now I'm two terms into CNEP. I knew I wanted to go to Frontier after nursing school but dreaded the thought of getting my BSN. When they announced the ADN Bridge I didn't think twice. If I'd have gone to get my BSN through an RN to BSN program I'd still be taking pre-reqs.
    Doodleit likes this.
  13. Visit  Apgar10 profile page
    0
    Quote from mom2michael
    You have to take a Stats class and a PA class thru an approved school (or thru them)
    What is a PA class? Public awareness? Physician assistant? Pharmacology aptitude? :chuckle And what about chemistry? Did all you bridge walkers do that? Speaking of math, stats is stats... how about other math prereqs? Did they expect you'd done college algerbra or higher before the stats class?
  14. Visit  mom2michael profile page
    0
    Quote from Apgar10
    What is a PA class? Public awareness? Physician assistant? Pharmacology aptitude? :chuckle And what about chemistry? Did all you bridge walkers do that? Speaking of math, stats is stats... how about other math prereqs? Did they expect you'd done college algerbra or higher before the stats class?
    Physical Assessment.

    In order to be a "bridge walker" you must have an ADN degree. An ADN degree will require a series of classes, college algebra and chemistry were very much a part of my ADN degree and I imagine just about every other ADN degree out there........

    I'm not in the bridge program so my situation is different. The bridge students take a series of classes over their first year at Frontier that are designed to transition them from their ADN education to the MSN education.
  15. Visit  kalley profile page
    1
    How competitive is the Bridge? What can I do now, as a pre-nursing student, to help assure myself a spot once I qualify?
    honeybec likes this.


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