CNM vs CM?

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    There is this school to teach Midwifery, the link is http://www.midwiferycollege.org/ASM.htm
    My question is, would a school like that be worth it? Or is it better to go for Nurse Midwifery? Is the job market better for CNMs over CMs? I do live in New Mexico, which is friendly toward midwifery.
    Thanks!
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  4. 1
    My understanding is only NY and NJ license CMs.
    tablefor9 likes this.
  5. 0
    This program helps you get a CPM (narm.org) not a CM. Then you could be licensed in NM as a LM (I think that is the license) and not a CNM or CM. I do know a few who have gone through the program. I guess is just depends on your career goals. It is important to remember that CPM programs/licenses are completely unrelated to RN/CNM education and licensing (and jobs).

    -Lynnette, first a CPM, then a RN, now in CNM school
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    I know NM licenses CMs because that is what my midwife was and she runs her own practice. CNMs are trained differently, hired in hospitals, and have a different set of skills. I am thinking there is more job security as CNM because it seems so far that the other options you have to work out of your own practice
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    It is just so hard to get all of those letters clear. Non nurse midwives in NM are known as LM. If they license the CM (those that take the same test as ACNM) then that will need to be investigated further. Again, the school posted is for gaining the CPM and then becoming licensed as non nurse midwife in whatever state the student lives in. In Colorado we are called RM for registered midwife. In most other states they use the LM designation. Of course other states do not license for non nurse midwifery at all. It is important to consider carefully any education path and be sure that it is getting you what you want.
  8. 0
    Quote from Devie06
    I know NM licenses CMs because that is what my midwife was and she runs her own practice. CNMs are trained differently, hired in hospitals, and have a different set of skills. I am thinking there is more job security as CNM because it seems so far that the other options you have to work out of your own practice
    New Mexico licenses Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNM) and Certified Professional Midwives (CPM) and calls them licensed midwives (LM). Certified Midwives (CM) are only licensed in Rhode Island and New York.

    If you go to National College of Midwifery (NCM), you will earn an Associate of Science in Midwifery, take the NARM exam and become a Certified Professional Midwife and then a licensed midwife in NM. If you decided later you would like to be a CNM, you'll have to start from square one because of the accreditation of the school, credits don't transfer to regionally accredited colleges where nursing degrees and post-grad degrees are granted. I know this from experience... I'm a 2006 grad of NCM and in nursing school now. Three years for the midwifery degree and now on my fifth year of finishing the prereqs and actual nursing degree. I'm pretty burned out and don't think I will head to CNM school. Moral of the story, is it is easier to be a CNM because it catches all for your education, is legal in all 50 states, and you practice where you want (home, birth center, hospital).
  9. 0
    Quote from Devie06
    I know NM licenses CMs because that is what my midwife was and she runs her own practice. CNMs are trained differently, hired in hospitals, and have a different set of skills. I am thinking there is more job security as CNM because it seems so far that the other options you have to work out of your own practice
    I think you have your midwife's credentials confused. I know that New Mexico does not license CMs. I'm guessing that she is a CPM (certified professional midwife). CPMs generally just do homebirths. They are not ever employed by hospitals. I'm not sure if CPMs can run free-standing birth centers.

    Why do you think CNMs are trained differently, though? I'm curious what you think the differences are? Also, in many states, CNMs can practice in hospitals, free-standing birthing centers, and at home; they're not limited to JUST hospitals.
  10. 0
    Quote from klone
    Why do you think CNMs are trained differently, though? I'm curious what you think the differences are?
    I'm not the OP (but I am a CPM and a nursing student) but there is a HUGE difference. CNMs have a nursing fundamentals foundation on which to build the rest of their practice, CPMs don't (and IMNSHO now that I have it, that's too bad). CNMs have standardized education, CPMs don't. Since you asked the question, I wonder why you ask? Do you think they aren't trained differently?
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    I don't think that is what is happening here. I think the OP was confusing CM and LM and saying that the LM is trained differently as a CNM as we all know is true. then the multiple cutting and pasting is just confusing the issue more. Since we have not heard follow up from OP, we cannot know what exactly she meant by CM, but we do know the CM (as certified by the ACNM or whatever it is) is not the same as most LMs that are CPMs first.
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    I'm not talking about the foundation that happens BEFORE schooling (I know that's vastly different). I'm talking about the actual midwifery training.

    I don't know very much about CPM schools, so I was honestly asking. But I guess I figured midwifery training was midwifery training, and I guess I couldn't figure out how they could be so vastly different.


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