Bedside... Really? - page 2

Hey guys! Do any of you all know of a CNM program that does not require one to be an RN first or do bedside nursing? After doing a lot of research, I really don't think bedside nursing is for me.... Read More

  1. Visit  Jennie.K profile page
    0
    Oh my goodness people, yes I have shadowed RNs. Yes, I am unsure which path I should take (there are only a million to choose from). Please, excuse me for posting a question on a public forum instead of doing my own research about different programs. I am not looking to be attacked for not wanting to do bedside nursing for years before becoming an NP. Yes, I do understand that an NP is still nursing. This is why I want to do it. I am just looking at everything available and weighing the options to decide what is best for myself.

    Stephalump, thank you so much for your support/information/opinion in various posts. I really do appreciate the advise and pointing out various possible realities without the attack. Good news!! I spoke with Georgetown University and they are a Yellow Ribbon school! (Super excited because I did not know this!) Meaning I can use my husband's GI Bill and Yellow Ribbon to cover most of that expense for the CNM/WHCNP program. Also, I will still have my scholarships at my BSN school next semester, if we haven't moved yet. After all the stress and unknown, I am finally seeing light at the end of the tunnel! Now if the Army would just get with the picture LOL I've just been stressing because once the decision is made and things start rolling, there is no going back!
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  3. Visit  emdrn74 profile page
    11
    Bedside nursing can be pretty bad. BUT that's where you develop your assessment skills and "nursing intuition". All your learning comes from your patients and bedside is where that learning happens. No book/class or title can prepare you for real time emergency stuff. Yes it sucks but you will be a better advanced practitioner for it. One MD I work with only hires NPs and refuses to hire PAs because NPs generally have a few yrs bedside . This particular MD (with 20+yrs exp) claims NPs are better at picking up subtle changes etc. Experience is worth it's weight in gold. It thickens your skin, helps you tune out background noise and zero in on things. You will be far more efficient and more respected by your peers. Remember, you will be working with RNs and LPNs and they will sniff your inexperience out. It's a trust thing. Imagine you need to start an IV? Or put a catheter in? People will look to you for leadership and thats something you develop over time with lots of bumps and bruises.
    JrRnNycole, BusyBee91, restlessnerd, and 8 others like this.
  4. Visit  Jennie.K profile page
    2
    Quote from emdrn74
    Bedside nursing can be pretty bad. BUT that's where you develop your assessment skills and "nursing intuition". All your learning comes from your patients and bedside is where that learning happens. No book/class or title can prepare you for real time emergency stuff. Yes it sucks but you will be a better advanced practitioner for it. One MD I work with only hires NPs and refuses to hire PAs because NPs generally have a few yrs bedside . This particular MD (with 20+yrs exp) claims NPs are better at picking up subtle changes etc. Experience is worth it's weight in gold. It thickens your skin, helps you tune out background noise and zero in on things. You will be far more efficient and more respected by your peers. Remember, you will be working with RNs and LPNs and they will sniff your inexperience out. It's a trust thing. Imagine you need to start an IV? Or put a catheter in? People will look to you for leadership and thats something you develop over time with lots of bumps and bruises.
    Thank you for the reply! I didn't look at it like that. I think I was just trying to find a speedy way to get to the end. However, experience takes time. Who knows, I may find that I love bedside nursing once I start! Besides, I want to be the best NP I can possibly be and I don't think that can happen without a good foundation to work off of.
    OnlybyHisgraceRN and wooh like this.
  5. Visit  NYCRN16 profile page
    3
    Quote from emdrn74
    Bedside nursing can be pretty bad. BUT that's where you develop your assessment skills and "nursing intuition". All your learning comes from your patients and bedside is where that learning happens. No book/class or title can prepare you for real time emergency stuff. Yes it sucks but you will be a better advanced practitioner for it. One MD I work with only hires NPs and refuses to hire PAs because NPs generally have a few yrs bedside . This particular MD (with 20+yrs exp) claims NPs are better at picking up subtle changes etc. Experience is worth it's weight in gold. It thickens your skin, helps you tune out background noise and zero in on things. You will be far more efficient and more respected by your peers. Remember, you will be working with RNs and LPNs and they will sniff your inexperience out. It's a trust thing. Imagine you need to start an IV? Or put a catheter in? People will look to you for leadership and thats something you develop over time with lots of bumps and bruises.
    This is 1000000% true. NP education does not teach you how to care for a patient, it just builds on what you are supposed to have picked up through experience. If you or anyone else goes straight through without knowing the basics you will find yourself lost and probably in court for screwing up. Take one step at a time, you will be glad you did. Good luck!
    fromtheseaRN, roser13, and OCNRN63 like this.
  6. Visit  tigerlogic profile page
    0
    OHSU for one has a BSN/CNM program, very competitive. Its one of the few direct entry masters that doesn't require experience. Depending on the state you live in and why you value the midwifery part-- you may want to "just" be a midwife. They generally work in birthing centers and don't follow the kids all that long after birth. They run the show and don't report to doctors. You have the option of being needed in many different types of communities and population groups-- but aren't in the hospital. The hours are crazy and I doubt they make buck... But I'm curious why you aren't interested in that route.
  7. Visit  WannaBNursey profile page
    0
    I have a question similar to this. I know some programs will let you enter without having specific L&D or Women's health experience, but would say experience in LTC be appropriate?
  8. Visit  SuzieeQ profile page
    1
    Quote from roser13
    It's hard not to feel dissed by this post. OP seems to be saying "I want to be a nurse, but I don't want to do the yucky stuff that goes with nursing - I'll just skip over that part."

    Kind of like saying you want to go to school to be a teacher, but don't want to teach actual students.
    Dead on.
    cardiacrocks likes this.
  9. Visit  Jolie profile page
    1
    Quote from roser13
    Kind of like saying you want to go to school to be a teacher, but don't want to teach actual students.
    My kids have had a few teachers like that...
    cardiacrocks likes this.
  10. Visit  OnlybyHisgraceRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Jolie
    My kids have had a few teachers like that...
    There are nurses lie this too....
  11. Visit  Altra profile page
    3
    I'm curious why you would hone in on nurse-midwifery as a career, when you indicate that you don't have a particular interest in delivering babies. IMO, that is why women choose a midwife as a provider ... because they want a midwife to attend the birth.
    JrRnNycole, mamagui, and fromtheseaRN like this.
  12. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    0
    Take a look at Frontier Nursing University --the birthplace of nurse midwifery in the US. Their Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner program maybe what you are looking for.. Programs are distance education.
  13. Visit  Jennie.K profile page
    0
    Quote from SuperMeghan91
    I have a question similar to this. I know some programs will let you enter without having specific L&D or Women's health experience, but would say experience in LTC be appropriate?
    A lot of the programs I have spoken with will accept students with any hospital experience. They understand that L&D units are really hard to get into. Also, Georgetown told me that they will not penalize an applicant for doing an ADN then bridging to BSN; but they do prefer that the applicant went through a traditional BSN program.
  14. Visit  Jennie.K profile page
    1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Take a look at Frontier Nursing University --the birthplace of nurse midwifery in the US. Their Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner program maybe what you are looking for.. Programs are distance education.
    Thank you for the info! I have narrowed it down to either Frontier or Georgetown. Since I am still working on my BSN, I am going to stay open to which grad school to go to. I also spoke with my nursing adviser this morning and she too mentioned Frontier. She also broke things down and explained, in more detail, why getting experience and feeling comfortable with bedside nursing would be important.
    SHGR likes this.


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