a male midwife??? :S - page 3

hi everyone.. i was just wondering whether its true that a male become a midwife?? :specs: appantly they can...but doesnt that defeat the purpose of being a midWIFE? They should be... Read More

  1. by   cnm in progress
    Quote from RN34TX
    As a male who has never worked in OB/L&D/post-partum whatever, I'm really disturbed at the number of topics that show up here on this subject.

    I see them pop up from time to time and I'm wondering why.

    Why can a female LPN/RN grab a man's genitals to insert a foley, yet so much controversy over a man working in OB/L&D?
    Big double standard.

    And why do the men have to explain their career motives?
    Why is it so much different for a man to be in the vulnerable position as a patient than it is for a woman?

    Along the same lines, why is there so much fuss over men working in these areas yet it remains unquestioned that a man chooses to be a MD specializing in these areas?

    I am an outsider in these areas and have no idea outside of clinicals what goes on in OB, so I really want to know what the big deal is for men to be working in these areas.
    Let me first start by saying that there is absolutely nothing wrong with male midwives... midwifery is about how you view pregnancy, labor, birth, and women... not about gender.

    That said, it's rather uncommon for men to view women and childbirth through the midwifery model. Most men who want to deliver babies want to be in control (obstetricians) and aren't willing to let the woman be the center of the process (midwives). I work with a male midwife, but I can assure you that he is not your typical man. There may be some burly, macho, testosterone-filled male midwives out there who are absolutely fantastic, but it might be rather difficult for the pregnant/laboring woman to form the unique trusting relationship that occurs with midwives. Although midwives empower women, there is also a bit of "mothering" that I think occurs during the labor process--not something most men can/would provide.

    It really has nothing to do with seeing/touching the genitals of the opposite sex.

    Does that help?
    Last edit by cnm in progress on May 20, '09 : Reason: added info
  2. by   Cammie895
    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I was always told that the actual term "midwife" means "with women" - as in "the person who is with the woman during childbirth." The word "wife" in "midwife" refers to the woman giving birth, not the person catching the baby. So to call a male midwife a "midhusband" would be to say that he is with the woman's husband during the birth instead of with the woman actually birthing the baby. Hope I'm making sense.

    To me, midwifery is about the way the person views the birthing process and the type of care they provide. For myself, I would likely choose a male midwife over a female OB. I can understand why some women might only feel comfortable with other women though, but for the most part I'm always happy to see more midwives out there. If more men getting into the field would help make midwifery more common I'm all for it. I just had another baby 9 months ago and the lack of birthing options in my area was pretty depressing. I'd have been thrilled to find a well-trained male midwife who shares my view of the birthing process (which I have learned even varies greatly among midwives, but I'd still like to increase my odds, lol).
  3. by   epiphany
    Quote from Cammie895
    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I was always told that the actual term "midwife" means "with women" - as in "the person who is with the woman during childbirth." The word "wife" in "midwife" refers to the woman giving birth, not the person catching the baby. So to call a male midwife a "midhusband" would be to say that he is with the woman's husband during the birth instead of with the woman actually birthing the baby. Hope I'm making sense.
    Yes.

    And I would chose a male midwife over a female OB any day. I don't endear myself to female OB's after what I have seen.
  4. by   CNM2B
    Quote from beanie29
    I'm guessing that the man with the catheter won't look back on that day for the rest of his life with love and amazement.
    :chuckle :chuckle

    Not trying to be disrespectful to the earlier poster, but this is too funny to pass up!
  5. by   dg05
    beanie29

    I'm wondering about your statement "When I'm giving birth, I like to be with women who have birthed before." Does that mean you would be uncomfortable with me attending your birth? I'm a woman who is preparing to enter midwifery school. I have never given birth before (and possibly never will). Where do women like me fall in this debate? Are we de facto men because we haven't had this experience?
  6. by   egregious
    Wow!

    I am a male considering midwifery as a potential career path and I am very pleased to hear all of the positive feedback on this topic. Thanks to everyone that took the time to contribute pro and con.

    One concern that I have that has not been addressed here are the career prospects for male midwives. I have no doubt that I could earn my credentials, but I have some concern about actually finding work / clientele as such.

    Thanks again, all!

close