rate calculation - page 3

Just wondering how you all calculate the rate to run drips at. Do you do the long hand math, do your docs calculate and you run at prescribed mL/hr? Personally, we have IV pumps that we... Read More

  1. by   angelique777
    Quote from Pete495
    Our monitors can figure out certain drip rates if they are programmed in. We have short cuz methods too that we use for our most common drips.

    the short cut is cc/hr x core number / kg body weight = mcg's/kg/min

    Also, mcgs/kg/min x kg body weight/ core number = cc/hour

    each drip has a different core number. If you'd like the core numbers, let me know. I have a lot of them.


    Anyway, I use that to calculate drips. Our IV pumps can calculate drips, but I don't use them. I don't think it is good practice to use them. If it is heparin or vasopressin or something, I like to figure it out long hand even if it takes a minute. That way I know in my mind it was done right, and I can always ask someone else to check my method. If you plug in the wrong numbers too fast on a machine, you might screw yourself.

    Pete495
    Can you give a sample problem with calculation with core numbers and all hope you can
    thanks
  2. by   angelique777
    Quote from TexasCCRN
    Personally I love those pumps that do the figuring for you, but never do I completly trust it. The safe way is to always figure out your drips. I made a chart for potent drips and keep it with me all the time. It only takes a few seconds to figure out and it may save you a lot of trouble with a lawsuit or more importantly a patient's life. I will be more than happy to send the chart to you by email if you want it.
    would love the chart you can send me a private message -thanks so much
    Last edit by sirI on May 23, '06
  3. by   Code90
    Our monitors and IV pumps calculate the drip rates for us. However, I've been around since before that capability existed and I like to perform my own calculations and have a drip chart available. There's a great website that provides information about drugs, calculations, renal dosing, etc., that can be used to generate a drip chart. It's at globalrph.com, click on "medical calculators" and then "dynamic drip rate table. This website is based at the VA medical center in Detroit and provides an excellent reference. Of course, I always have my pocket calculator available to double-check doses and indicators such as SVRI, etc.
  4. by   yokemnurse
    Quote from Pete495
    Our monitors can figure out certain drip rates if they are programmed in. We have short cuz methods too that we use for our most common drips.

    the short cut is cc/hr x core number / kg body weight = mcg's/kg/min

    Also, mcgs/kg/min x kg body weight/ core number = cc/hour

    each drip has a different core number. If you'd like the core numbers, let me know. I have a lot of them.


    Anyway, I use that to calculate drips. Our IV pumps can calculate drips, but I don't use them. I don't think it is good practice to use them. If it is heparin or vasopressin or something, I like to figure it out long hand even if it takes a minute. That way I know in my mind it was done right, and I can always ask someone else to check my method. If you plug in the wrong numbers too fast on a machine, you might screw yourself.

    Pete495
    Hey Pete, yea if you could email me the core rates that would be great, please send me a private message -thanks alot
    Last edit by sirI on May 23, '06 : Reason: edit email address
  5. by   Going2go
    Pete,
    I've never heard the term "core weight" in R/T a drug....what does this mean? Does every drip medication have a core #? If so, where/how does one go about getting them? Thanks

    Going2go
  6. by   sassyg0110
    Hi Pete495,

    I would like to know your core numbers...thank you. We've become way too dependent on our pump calcs (me included). I noticed over the last few years that most of our newer grads don't do the math or utilize the monographs; they were taught to use pump calcs? I don't know. I do know I'd like a little cheat sheet in my handy dandy nurse-stuff bag
  7. by   RYNOBLASTER30
    As a nurse you should be able to figure out drug calcs, especially in an icu. I just finished up a travel contract in San Antonio, and they had pumps which you couldn't program. You wouldn't believe the number of nurses who could not figure this out. Unsafe for the patients. Really comes in handy during a code situation

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