Is this the norm or unfair? thoughts and opinions needed!! - page 2

by nursingpower 4,811 Views | 18 Comments

place: cardiac icu scenario: bob is working an 8 hr shift and has two patients. one pt is expected to transfer to stepdown unit. the charge nurse tameka just learned that an patient must be placed in their unit from the... Read More


  1. 0
    Stand your ground! If you feel like you are being treated unfairly, then you probably are. That situation was not the best for the PATIENT or the nurse. If you let people know that they can run over you then they will!
  2. 0
    I figured that Bob was probably the newbie and those with the lighter patient loads were more experienced. There are two schools of thought here, first, Bob was at the end of his shift, his patient wasn't ready to go yet, and he needed orders among other things. Therefore, LOGIC would dictate that one of the 12 hour nurses with an empty bed would take the OR. Also, this would prevent OT which we all know is a HOT topic today.

    The other thought is that since Bob is new he needs to experience gettting a fresh OR as often as possible to gain experience.

    I started a new job 3 weeks ago, I have over 30 years experience and I have new grads and people with less than 10 years experience trying to teach me to be a nurse, organize, and do procedures. I feel humiliated most days because these people have never bothered to find out what I've done or what I know.
    Most of them were not born when I started nursing. I just talk with my manager, suck it up, and say, 6 more shifts.

    Hang in there. I think you got some great suggestions. Teamwork is a great focus and management should be receptive to a few newbies wanting to make the unit better.

    Good Luck. Let us know how it goes.
  3. 0
    Quote from nursingpower
    place: cardiac icu

    scenario:
    bob is working an 8 hr shift and has two patients. one pt is expected to transfer to stepdown unit. the charge nurse tameka just learned that an patient must be placed in their unit from the or. a bed is needed. there are 2 other nurses in the unit, sherry and sandy that have one patient. sherry has had one patient all morning and she is working a 12hr shift. sherry and sandra both have an open bedspaces that are clean and ready to receive a pt from the or.

    two hours before bob's end of shift:
    the charge nurse tameka asks bob how soon can he get his patients up. the nurse informs tameka that he has to give iv meds, recheck labs, awaiting floor orders, pull lines, etc so no, not ready. tameka sighs under her breath and walks away.

    1 1/2 hours before end of shift:
    charge nurse tameka asks bob if he can get his patient out. bob stated that he called report and is in the process of preparing his patient for transport. he states that his patient will be ready to leave in about 10-15 minutes. tameka says, "good" you have a case called from the or. you have 30 minutes.

    60 minutes before end of shift:
    15 minutes has past and bob's patient is discharged from the unit, leaving 15 minutes for bob to set up the bedspace (getting supplies, setting kvo pump) all the while while briefly tending to the needs of his other patient. the cleaning crew also spend those same 15 minute disinfecting the bedspace (bed, pillows, pumps, taking out trash, mop floor etc).

    45 minutes before end of shift:

    the floor has just dried and the case is on its way from the or. bob receives the case. three nurses including tameka and sherry assists bob with getting report and getting patient settled into the bedspace. bob tends to patient needs, getting pt hemodynamically stable and addressing pain issues, retrieving meds, reviewing new icu orders, sending labs, and talking to family members.

    bob notices that as he is doing his work, the charge rn tameka, sherry and sandy are all gossiping and laughing at the nursing station.

    5 minutes before end of shift:
    bob is unprepared but gives report to the oncoming nurse. the oncoming nurse is rushed to complete a lot of task for the new patient in addition to tending to the 2nd patient. bob spends and extra 20 minutes past his shift (10 minutes till next hour) finishing up his work (signing off meds, charting, shift i&o's).


    what are your thoughts and opinions on this scenario?
    bob, i'm not saying this happened in this case, but i've witnessed it happen time and time again throughout my career, where you may find that as a male nurse, your own workload may be heavier than that of your female peers. sometimes it may be intentional, others not, but it is just that many expect that males are capable of dealing with a heavier load than females. it has gotten much better over the years, but when i first started nursing it was horrible, the men were called upon to get patients in and out of bed, to turn the heavier patients from side to side and still today, subdue the rowdier patients in house and mental health. this was in addition to completing a full patient load. working 1500-2300, sometimes it was 0200-0300 hrs before we'd ever get out of there. all those years of lifting heavy patients, not necessarily practicing the best body mechanics, and a war, are what put me in a wheelchair today. maybe a combination of a couple of other things added to it as well, but lift with your legs young man, and make sure your teams are even.
  4. 0
    Quote from fmf corpsman
    bob, i'm not saying this happened in this case, but i've witnessed it happen time and time again throughout my career, where you may find that as a male nurse, your own workload may be heavier than that of your female peers. sometimes it may be intentional, others not, but it is just that many expect that males are capable of dealing with a heavier load than females. it has gotten much better over the years, but when i first started nursing it was horrible, the men were called upon to get patients in and out of bed, to turn the heavier patients from side to side and still today, subdue the rowdier patients in house and mental health. this was in addition to completing a full patient load. working 1500-2300, sometimes it was 0200-0300 hrs before we'd ever get out of there. all those years of lifting heavy patients, not necessarily practicing the best body mechanics, and a war, are what put me in a wheelchair today. maybe a combination of a couple of other things added to it as well, but lift with your legs young man, and make sure your teams are even.
    my name isn't bob and i am not a male nurse. lol this scenario had nothing to do with anyone's ability to lift. our job requirements is to lift, push, pull 50 lbs regardless of age, gender and size. my scenario refers to how new nurses or less favored nurses in the unit are treated. charge nurses that unevenly distribute the work load so than them and their "friends" don't have to do much work while others are swamped.
  5. 0
    Okay, if it's happening with that kind of pattern, that's different. I'd go up to the desk and state I need help, and since you clearly have time, come here and help. And if I had to keep doing that over and over and the situation never changed, I'd be lookin' around for a more team-oriented workplace.
  6. 0
    Quote from nursingpower
    place: cardiac icu


    what are your thoughts and opinions on this scenario?
    This sounds bad...If it keeps happening you need to notify your director.
  7. 0
    If you work in an environment where you feel that certain nurses and new nurses are "less favored" than I would imagine that it's normal for nurses to have uneven workloads because of favoritism. If you feel like everyone is treated equally and there's a lot of team work on your unit then I would think that maybe the charge RN made a mistake and didn't realize Bob only works 8 hours, was distracted and didn't realize that the assignment didn't make sense, doesn't have a lot of experience being charge, thought Bob might want the experience if he's new... you get the idea. Either way Bob should be assertive and speak up if he feels he's getting the shaft or he could sink to their level, drag his feet, and hang on to his transfer til shift change... (I do not endorse this behavior, our ED is notorious for doing stuff like that i.e. admitted at 1500 but gets to the unit somewhere between 1830-1900 and it makes me CRAZY!)
  8. 0
    Is this the norm or unfair?

    What makes you think these two are mutually incompatible?
    Sounds like in your environment they go hand in hand.

    I'll take a wild guess that Tameka is friends, or at least friendly, with the nurses getting the light load. Maybe not so much with Bob.

    FWIW- I rarely object to an assignment (ER). When I do, it is always on the basis of safety, not fairness. Arguing whats fair and not can seem petty- advocating for pt safety is a required part of the job.
  9. 0
    Bob next time ask for KY

    And tell the others to quit stuffing there mouths with donuts and do something


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