no monitor tech? - page 3

I just started as a CNA on an Intermediate Cardiac Care unit. It is a telemetry unit but they said they recently lost the monitor tech. So my question is, if nobody is watching the monitors, then... Read More

  1. by   Indy
    I like having monitor techs to a degree. What I don't like is having monitor techs but no computer screen at one of our nurse stations. Yah, they can call me if something goes wrong but it's not always possible to answer the phone! So Vamedic, you're asking if we're willing to put our license on the line not having a tech? I've told my manager the nurse is responsible for the patient whether or not an unlicensed tech picks up the phone to call for a problem so having a monitor at the desk is a necessity.

    I pay good attention to the screens on the units where I have them, and if I have time I'll talk to the monitor techs to explain why I am or am not worried about something. They appreciate the consideration; I may get less phone calls or more appropriate phone calls. But nothing replaces a nurse who's good at reading rythyms, not even a cardiologist, because they are on the unit maybe an hour a day. One other thing, besides a desk monitor screen, that I have on my wish list: a portable monitor like the one on the code cart, that does nothing but monitor, and is fairly small. I want it for when I'm pushing cardizem boluses, or spending time titrating dopamine, etc. That'd be sweet!
  2. by   NurseyPoo
    We do not have monitor techs at my location and the RN is responsible for monitoring the patient. On the telemetry floor there was a huge bank of monitors and they were VERY NOISY. So, if an alarm sounded everyone on the floor knew it. We carried phones and would be alerted to a problem via phone. If I was busy and my phone went off after hearing an alarm sounding I would either yell down the hall or stop what I was doing if possible to make sure that I was not needed. I think a monitor tech is a great idea, but I do not think the facility I work in has ever had them.

    In the ICU that I work in there are 4 monitor banks. We also have a screen in each corner of the unit with a message that lights up with the room number and the problem while the alarms are sounding. If there is a code the system alerts the nursing supervisor and he/she will be there in minutes. Sometimes after shift I can still here the alarms in my head when I try to fall asleep...
  3. by   augigi
    We don't have monitor techs at all in Australia. We do have the paging system. We also have nurse/patient ratios mandated by law, so I haven't ever found I couldn't observe the montitors of my assigned patients.
  4. by   vamedic4
    Quote from Indy
    I like having monitor techs to a degree. What I don't like is having monitor techs but no computer screen at one of our nurse stations. Yah, they can call me if something goes wrong but it's not always possible to answer the phone! So Vamedic, you're asking if we're willing to put our license on the line not having a tech? I've told my manager the nurse is responsible for the patient whether or not an unlicensed tech picks up the phone to call for a problem so having a monitor at the desk is a necessity.

    _____---___----___----___----___----____----

    The above makes perfect sense, Indy. We're lucky here as we have both- central monitoring (unobtrusive and hidden down a hallway), as well as monitors at both ends of the unit where nurses can keep an eye on their patients as well. Overhead paging and "priority messaging" are a must, however...no matter where you are.


    I pay good attention to the screens on the units where I have them, and if I have time I'll talk to the monitor techs to explain why I am or am not worried about something. They appreciate the consideration; I may get less phone calls or more appropriate phone calls. But nothing replaces a nurse who's good at reading rythyms, not even a cardiologist, because they are on the unit maybe an hour a day. One other thing, besides a desk monitor screen, that I have on my wish list: a portable monitor like the one on the code cart, that does nothing but monitor, and is fairly small. I want it for when I'm pushing cardizem boluses, or spending time titrating dopamine, etc. That'd be sweet!
    --Right!!

    Here working with kids we have a good idea what to expect from certain CHDs and their corrective surgeries so it's not so big an issue. It's those general peds kids we have to worry about!!!

    vamedic4
  5. by   Indy
    Well, I have found, in terms of omigosh moments, it's never the patient you expect who will go into vtach, fib, arrest on ya. Beware the quiet ones!

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