New cardiac nurse--advice? - page 2

I'm a brand-new RN (yay!), and I just accepted a position on a step-down unit that is almost entirely cardiology. I did lots of clinical hours on the unit during school and I love it (great staff,... Read More

  1. Visit  Pneumothorax profile page
    0
    Quote from queenjulie
    Ah, now I know why I haven't heard of the sheath removal--our cath lab uses Mynx closures almost exclusively. I've seen at least a dozen patients after their cardiac caths, but none of them had the old-fashioned closure; they all had a Mynx done.
    so im a new cardiac nurse also,... &&&& i JUST learned about mynx closures when i did the job shadowing for this position. sick or what? i feel like they shouldve maybe skimmed over it in school? lol.
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  3. Visit  kylee_adns profile page
    0
    I am a new nurse in a Cardiac Progressive Care unit (step-down unit) with only a few days left in orientation. One thing I had to brush up on was chest tubes. I didn't really have much exposure in nursing school. What they are supposed to look like? how to tell if there is an air leak? What does it mean if they have an air leak when talking vs when coughing etc.

    For cardiac caths my facility uses angioseal, but sometimes closure devices are not able to be used for whatever reason. Sometimes they come to our floor with the sheath still in. Other times the cath lab pulls the sheath, and in that case we do a happy dance Good Luck to you!
  4. Visit  queenjulie profile page
    0
    Quote from Pneumothorax
    i JUST learned about mynx closures when i did the job shadowing for this position. sick or what? i feel like they shouldve maybe skimmed over it in school?
    '

    We never covered them in school either. In fact, we only barely mentioned cardiac catheterizations at all. The only reason I know about them is because I was assigned to the Step-Down unit for clinicals (where I'm now going to be working, yay!), and so I saw a lot of patients coming back from caths, and I got to go down with them and observe caths three or four times, which was awesome.
  5. Visit  queenjulie profile page
    0
    Quote from kylee_adns
    One thing I had to brush up on was chest tubes. I didn't really have much exposure in nursing school. What they are supposed to look like? how to tell if there is an air leak? What does it mean if they have an air leak when talking vs when coughing etc.
    I'm embarrassed to say that I have never once had a patient with a chest tube. Not a single time. I know virtually nothing about them--that is definitely going to be a learning experience. Our step-down unit very rarely gets chest tubes, though; they generally stay in ICU until the tube comes out, I think.
  6. Visit  GinaCat profile page
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    when it comes to chest tubes- I'd say just wait until you are oriented! there are wet systems and dry systems, and if your orientation is good they will review the particular model they use. but the principles are the same as what you find in your textbooks. i didn't have a grip on them until someone had one in front of me and pointed it all out. they all have different indicator floaties and things lol.
  7. Visit  RNmilwife profile page
    3
    I want to add to cardiacrocks and also say if your patient starts to say "I don't feel right" Listen. Sometimes its hard to assess that because they can't tell you exactly what they are feeling but if they say that they need very close monitoring and probing
  8. Visit  donnathompson profile page
    0
    I love Cardiology. I was a new grad in the summer of 2008 and went to work on a very busy cardiology floor. We like to call the floor "the beast". I LOVED working on this unit. It was hard, but a great training ground for what I am doing now and that is working for the very cardiologists that did all of our interventions on the unit. I started as a New Grad, and within one year became the Shift leader, charge nurse on the unit. I loved the transition and being an older graduate helped me with life experience and the issues that families dealt with, patients lived with and nurses had to face on a day to day basis. I am curious since it has been two years now since you posted this, how do you like cardiology? Are you still in the same position? This post is a requirement of the MSN program that I am currently in, but I am curious as to how you have done since you became a nurse.

    Looking forward to hearing your response,
    Blessings,
    Donna
  9. Visit  sawice profile page
    0
    Hi everyone. Reading these comments has been helpful for me since I now find myself in a similar position. I will be a new grad on a Cardiovascular step-down unit starting Sept 8th. I am going to be reviewing ECGs each day until I start and based on prior posts, will be watching youtube vids on chest tubes and cardiac caths. Would someone be willing to provide me a list of meds you commonly see so that I can brush up on those prior to starting? Any other tips not previously mentioned are also welcome!!

    Thank you all so much!
  10. Visit  michlynn profile page
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    The unit I work on is strictly cardiac/tele so we see all of the MI's, chest pains, arrythmias, pacemakers, etc. and I love it. The meds I work with most often are cardizem, amiodarone, lidocaine, dobutamine, dopamine, epi, atropine, adenosine, heparin, integrelin, and nitro. Our cath lab typically uses some sort of closure device post cath (mynx, quick clot, star close) but occasionally we'll get a sheath we have to pull. Our floor doesn't require 2 nurses in the room but we spend a week in the cath lab practicing pulling them.
    sawice likes this.
  11. Visit  sawice profile page
    1
    Thanks so much, michlynn!
    michlynn likes this.


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