Feelings of "dipping" in my heart....

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    For about a year now, I've been feeling what seemed like a flutter feeling in my heart. Then recently it is more like a dipping feeling. Almost like when you go on a roller coaster........that feeling you get in your chest. I have been a little light headed also. It's really scaring me. I work for an Endocrinologist so I know he'll let me order any test I want, but what test should I order......Echo, EKG, Halter Monitor? Any advice would be appriciated. Thanks in advance.


    P.S. I'm a healthy 30 year old who takes no medications.

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from J Lynn
    For about a year now, I've been feeling what seemed like a flutter feeling in my heart. Then recently it is more like a dipping feeling. Almost like when you go on a roller coaster........that feeling you get in your chest. I have been a little light headed also. It's really scaring me. I work for an Endocrinologist so I know he'll let me order any test I want, but what test should I order......Echo, EKG, Halter Monitor? Any advice would be appriciated. Thanks in advance.


    P.S. I'm a healthy 30 year old who takes no medications.
    How about, stop self treating and go SEE a doctor and let them examine you and determine what tests you may need...colds are one thing..heart issues are another ball game...nurses are the worst patients...Hey, you know what comes to mind.. "I'm sorry ma'am, we're not allowed to give medical information over the phone, but if you are concerned you certainly are welcome to come in and be evaluated..." Haha..they've beat it into my mind...take care of yourself and go see the doctor...
    Last edit by mommatrauma on May 11, '05
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    Palpitations are normal and the VAST majority of the time benign (especially in young, healthy people). If you're experiencing lightheadedness/dizziness along with these palpitations, a work-up is in order. This workup will include several 'tests', none of which can be considered any more or less 'important'. You mentioned Halter-monitor, and this would be an ideal test to rule-out serious dysrhythmias. An EKG would be useful, but wont show any rhythm disturbance unless you're actively experiencing palpitations as it's being run. An echo will detect structural abnormalities and estimate cardiac function...but again can't 'detect' abnormal rhythm's.

    As the previous poster stated, talk to your doctor. Specifically, tell him you become lightheaded/dizzy with your palpitations...
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    I second what Dinith said. Please go have it checked out by a cardiologist.
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    Yes get it checked out. Question how much coffee or colas do you drink???? PVC
  7. 0
    Quote from Dinith88
    Palpitations are normal and the VAST majority of the time benign (especially in young, healthy people). If you're experiencing lightheadedness/dizziness along with these palpitations, a work-up is in order. This workup will include several 'tests', none of which can be considered any more or less 'important'. You mentioned Halter-monitor, and this would be an ideal test to rule-out serious dysrhythmias. An EKG would be useful, but wont show any rhythm disturbance unless you're actively experiencing palpitations as it's being run. An echo will detect structural abnormalities and estimate cardiac function...but again can't 'detect' abnormal rhythm's.

    As the previous poster stated, talk to your doctor. Specifically, tell him you become lightheaded/dizzy with your palpitations...
    question? so a stress test is an in-duced rhythm disturbance? as in ST slope decellerations and blockage? or we want to see if there is a rhythm disturbance during the stresstest?
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    Quote from Christian_SN
    question? so a stress test is an in-duced rhythm disturbance? as in ST slope decellerations and blockage? or we want to see if there is a rhythm disturbance during the stresstest?
    Nope. A stress test is looking for ischemia. A stress-test 'stresses' the heart (by speeding it up). If your coronaries are 'tight' (producing ischemia) this test will (usually) show it. The traditional way to speed your rate is by running a treadmill...Or, (for people unable to run so well) drugs can be given.

    The 'treadmill' or 'stress' component of the test shows results if a person developes st/t-wave changes (and chest discomfort) on 12-lead (which is continuosly running during this test).
    The newer stress-tests utilize nuclear medicine (ie thallium stress-test) in conjunction with the standard tread-mill or injection stress. These are more accurate in that they will show changes that may be more subtle or undetectable by 12-lead. (they take 'pictures' before and after stress).

    BTW, i dont beleive a stress-test was mentioned in my previous post...and the other 3 (echo, halter-monitor, 12-lead) are different tests.

    And as an aside, abnormal rhythm's can be induced by ischemia...in which case a stress-test may 'induce' one...but it's not the intention of the test.

    EP-studies are the fancy tests that attempt to induce abnormal rhythms...if you're interested.
  9. 0
    Quote from Christian_SN
    question? so a stress test is an in-duced rhythm disturbance? as in ST slope decellerations and blockage? or we want to see if there is a rhythm disturbance during the stresstest?
    another point you should remember is that an 'abnormal rhythm' has nothing to do with ischemia and/or coronary 'blockage'...they're completely different animals. If, by 'ST slope decellerations' (??), you mean ST-segment changes (which would indicate 'blockage' (as you've mentioned)), then yes-a stress test would be looking for such things...But again remember that has nothing to do with a persons 'rhythm'...You can have a completely normal sinus rhythm and develope these ischemnia-induced ST changes.
    This all may seem a wee confusing, but after awhile this will become old-hat for you...


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