CNA in Telemetry

  1. 0
    Hi, I was just wondering what kinds of things CNAs would be doing in telemetry. I want to get a job in the hospital but don't know which area I want to work in. Any suggestions or ideas? I have no prior experience except clinicals. Thanks
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  4. 1
    Quote from kddex
    Hi, I was just wondering what kinds of things CNAs would be doing in telemetry. I want to get a job in the hospital but don't know which area I want to work in. Any suggestions or ideas? I have no prior experience except clinicals. Thanks
    I think you'd love tele! You'll learn as a CNA about ortho BPs, taking manual BPs for patients in A-fib, and you'll pick up a lot of incidental information about treating heart disease, stroke, and lung conditions, too.

    I'd say go for it!
    alexis_xoxo likes this.
  5. 3
    hi Kddex,

    i am currently working as a CNA on a tele unit. my job is super interesting. here's a typical day for me (not including all of the unexpected events of course, which are many). I work 12 hour shifts in a hospital with a very well known Heart Center and CCU; lots of patients!!

    0645: get report from night shift CNA, and a list of my patients and the nurses that have them.

    0700: introducing myself to pts, do vitals, some orthostatics, help pts to bathroom, work as fast as i can safely afford to, as this is for 10-13 patients in all ranges of indenpence and level of accuity.

    0830: chart vitals, help with breakfasts, baths, beds, bathroom, ADL's, ambulate pt's, get transfers from ED and CCU, or overflow from wherever.

    1100: second set of vitals, blood sugars on ACHS people, help with lunches, transfering zillions of patients to/from treadmills, cath lab, xray, PICC placements (IR), etc. more baths and ADL's for the late sleepers.

    1400: I&O's (most cardiac patients, esp. CABG people are on strict fluid restrictions. empty foleys, hats, ostomy bags, tally up drinks from B and L trays, and water pitcher, pass more ice water for those who can have more.

    1500: third set of vitals. usually a lot of admits at this time, after the poor person has been languishing in ED since like 0300 (they are usually very unhappy, hungry, tired, scared, etc. by the time they get up to tele) we have 2-3 circ nurses, that only do admits and discharges because we have SO MANY people coming and going on Tele. You will too. : )

    1600: second round of blood sugars, lots of charting on vitals, ADL's, sugars. D/C iv's, foleys for those who have been discharged.

    1700: ambulate, dinner stuff, bathroom stuff. transferring patients to TCU, home, SNF, wherever. help secretary take off orders. clean up the floor, empty linen, be a gopher for the nurses.

    1930: exhaustion. drive home, eyes droopy, back tired, frazzled, stressed, full of new learning experiences. one day closer to being a nurse myself.

    FYI, in my experience, many tele, if not most tele patients, have had open heart surgery, so they are on "sternal precautions", which means they can do just about nothing for themselves, even if they are young-ish (40's would be young), so you have to be prepared to do a lot of hard work. Also, a cool thing about tele, is many patients need cardiac monitoring, but they have other, non-cardiac medical issues, so you can learn quite a bit. Also, code Blue ("COR") gets called pretty frequently, relative to other floors I think), so be prepared for that. And it seems to me that many tele patients are extremly old people, just aging naturally, yet they are subjected to so many painful and pointless, invasive procedures that they end up dying from. Why put a pacer in a confused 97 year old lady?? But you will have NO option to voice your concerns, because as the CNA, you do what you are told, and what the patient needs. Healthcare sometimes seems to be about keeping suffering people alive at any cost.

    Of course, you will learn tons about cardiac meds, EKG strips, crazed doctors, and CCU nurses who are just very impressed with themselves.

    As far as CNA work goes, I would recommend it.

    Quote from kddex
    Hi, I was just wondering what kinds of things CNAs would be doing in telemetry. I want to get a job in the hospital but don't know which area I want to work in. Any suggestions or ideas? I have no prior experience except clinicals. Thanks
    Aprilb25, Benderover2, and FLg8r like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from kddex
    Hi, I was just wondering what kinds of things CNAs would be doing in telemetry. I want to get a job in the hospital but don't know which area I want to work in. Any suggestions or ideas? I have no prior experience except clinicals. Thanks
    Frankly--I havae never heard of CNA in telemtry--I worked in ICU CCU for years and only licensed nurses were allowed in units
  7. 0
    Quote from Annesy
    hi Kddex,

    i am currently working as a CNA on a tele unit. my job is super interesting. here's a typical day for me (not including all of the unexpected events of course, which are many). I work 12 hour shifts in a hospital with a very well known Heart Center and CCU; lots of patients!!

    0645: get report from night shift CNA, and a list of my patients and the nurses that have them.

    0700: introducing myself to pts, do vitals, some orthostatics, help pts to bathroom, work as fast as i can safely afford to, as this is for 10-13 patients in all ranges of indenpence and level of accuity.

    0830: chart vitals, help with breakfasts, baths, beds, bathroom, ADL's, ambulate pt's, get transfers from ED and CCU, or overflow from wherever.

    1100: second set of vitals, blood sugars on ACHS people, help with lunches, transfering zillions of patients to/from treadmills, cath lab, xray, PICC placements (IR), etc. more baths and ADL's for the late sleepers.

    1400: I&O's (most cardiac patients, esp. CABG people are on strict fluid restrictions. empty foleys, hats, ostomy bags, tally up drinks from B and L trays, and water pitcher, pass more ice water for those who can have more.

    1500: third set of vitals. usually a lot of admits at this time, after the poor person has been languishing in ED since like 0300 (they are usually very unhappy, hungry, tired, scared, etc. by the time they get up to tele) we have 2-3 circ nurses, that only do admits and discharges because we have SO MANY people coming and going on Tele. You will too. : )

    1600: second round of blood sugars, lots of charting on vitals, ADL's, sugars. D/C iv's, foleys for those who have been discharged.

    1700: ambulate, dinner stuff, bathroom stuff. transferring patients to TCU, home, SNF, wherever. help secretary take off orders. clean up the floor, empty linen, be a gopher for the nurses.

    1930: exhaustion. drive home, eyes droopy, back tired, frazzled, stressed, full of new learning experiences. one day closer to being a nurse myself.

    FYI, in my experience, many tele, if not most tele patients, have had open heart surgery, so they are on "sternal precautions", which means they can do just about nothing for themselves, even if they are young-ish (40's would be young), so you have to be prepared to do a lot of hard work. Also, a cool thing about tele, is many patients need cardiac monitoring, but they have other, non-cardiac medical issues, so you can learn quite a bit. Also, code Blue ("COR") gets called pretty frequently, relative to other floors I think), so be prepared for that. And it seems to me that many tele patients are extremly old people, just aging naturally, yet they are subjected to so many painful and pointless, invasive procedures that they end up dying from. Why put a pacer in a confused 97 year old lady?? But you will have NO option to voice your concerns, because as the CNA, you do what you are told, and what the patient needs. Healthcare sometimes seems to be about keeping suffering people alive at any cost.

    Of course, you will learn tons about cardiac meds, EKG strips, crazed doctors, and CCU nurses who are just very impressed with themselves.

    As far as CNA work goes, I would recommend it.
    Thanks. Sounds like you never get a chance to rest! I am still trying to decide if I can fit it in with my school schedule. I think the CNAs do 12 hr shifts in Tele at the hospital I am looking at also.
    Last edit by kddex on Feb 26, '05
  8. 0
    I've only been a CNA for a year and a half, and in that time, I have floated to all ICU/Neuro ICU/CCU, etc., types of units. Generally there are only two maximum CNA's, depending on the size of the unit. CNA work is more about scurrying around doing random tasks (emptying foleys, helping with code Browns, oral temps, suctioning, checking O2 sats, stocking supplies, moving a pt to a floor; generally the gross and/or mindless stuff that needs to be done but can be delegated) than a daily set of responsibilities that is typical on a floor. i like the ICU's because of the totally different type of nursing than what happens on a medical or tele floor. or any floor, they are all so different.

    Quote from DDANN
    Frankly--I havae never heard of CNA in telemtry--I worked in ICU CCU for years and only licensed nurses were allowed in units
  9. 0
    You are right. There is very little rest, lunch is often not until 2pm, and I am totally tired the next day. Try to avoid more than 2 twelve's in a row, otherwise you will burn out. Most of the CNA's I work with are students, and they seem to manage one shift a week, but they always have stuff to study in the even they get a minute off.

    Quote from kddex
    Thanks. Sounds like you never get a chance to rest! I am still trying to decide if I can fit it in with my school schedule. I think the CNAs do 12 hr shifts in Tele at the hospital I am looking at also.
  10. 0
    Everything that's been said above and CLEANING THE tele boxes Qshift with Monichlor. You're also expected to change the tele boxes batteries and replace worn out leads (you got the black, white, green, and red leads).

    I used to be a CP, monitor tech, and unit clerk on a telemetry med surg floor. Man, those were the good ol' days

    It sucks being responsible.

    If you got free time, go to any plugged in tele box and tap it rapidly. That should wake up the telemetry tech (V-TACH). :chuckle And no cell phones on a TELEMETRY UNIT. They're supposed to interfere with the sensors.
    Last edit by PHTLS on Mar 6, '05
  11. 0
    Quote from Annesy
    I've only been a CNA for a year and a half, and in that time, I have floated to all ICU/Neuro ICU/CCU, etc., types of units. Generally there are only two maximum CNA's, depending on the size of the unit. CNA work is more about scurrying around doing random tasks (emptying foleys, helping with code Browns, oral temps, suctioning, checking O2 sats, stocking supplies, moving a pt to a floor; generally the gross and/or mindless stuff that needs to be done but can be delegated) than a daily set of responsibilities that is typical on a floor. i like the ICU's because of the totally different type of nursing than what happens on a medical or tele floor. or any floor, they are all so different.
    Code Brown?

    I've heard of Code Blues, Gray (security), Red, Pink (kidnapping), and other technicolor codes, but never brown.
  12. 1
    Quote from PHTLS
    Code Brown?

    I've heard of Code Blues, Gray (security), Red, Pink (kidnapping), and other technicolor codes, but never brown.
    :chuckle

    Apologies. . . this just tickled my funny bone. Code Brown = "Poop Patrol". A lot of Code Browns can give a nurse a Code Blue! :chuckle

    Cheers!
    kristinpetersen123 likes this.


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