Can I place tele leads on a pt’s back? - page 2

I had a confused patient that kept pulling the leads off. The nurse before me placed them on their back and that seemed to solve the problem. Patient didn't pull them off and we still could read the... Read More

  1. by   2210485
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    In surgery, we placed the RA and LA leads on the top of the shoulder. The RL and LL leads are on the hips, low enough to be out of the sterile field. The V lead is just below the axilla. The leads aren't technically on the back where the patient would be lying on them, but are as posterior as possible. For the cable connecting L to R sided leads, we run it under the pillow so the patient isn't lying directly on anything.
    This is cath lab placement as well.
  2. by   2210485
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    In surgery, we placed the RA and LA leads on the top of the shoulder. The RL and LL leads are on the hips, low enough to be out of the sterile field. The V lead is just below the axilla. The leads aren't technically on the back where the patient would be lying on them, but are as posterior as possible. For the cable connecting L to R sided leads, we run it under the pillow so the patient isn't lying directly on anything.
    This is cath lab placement as well.

    The only lead that should really be affected for those telemetry setups should be v1.. Basically you gotta just write that one off as a loss.. Placement directly posterior will theoretically yield the same vector just reversed.. But not nearly the degree of precision you get from a properly placed v1. Unfortunately its unipolar so youre sort of limited here.. Try posterior Or just throw it on v6 and use that.

    The arm and leg leads/bipolars can basically go anywhere, as long as the distance from ra to la, and from ra or la to ll is the same.. That should keep wilsons central terminal in place

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