Any cath lab RNs required to take the RCIS?

  1. 0 I am interested in finding out if there are other labs that are making their nursing staff to take the RCIS?
  2. Visit  inthelab profile page

    About inthelab

    46 Years Old; Joined Aug '08; Posts: 5; Likes: 3.

    16 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  CCL RN profile page
    0
    Not for me. I asked if I needed it and was told it was like getting your CCRN-meaning, it was not required, but nice if you have it.

    Seems like it's different now then previous versions? I think you had to take 2 tests prior and now it's only one? I haven't really researched it much...
  4. Visit  inthelab profile page
    1
    I think that if you are non nursing it is a 2 part test, but nursing it is one part. The lab I work in is trying to strong arm everyone into taking it. I would rather take the CCRN or some certification that is specific to nursing. This allows Radtechs,CVTs,Resp therapist, and I think anyone who is grandfathered into the cath lab if you do not have an allied health degree to be RCIS certified. I was hoping to see the benefit in taking this test... I work in a lab where there are a good mixture of talents. Everyone can do everyone else's job, so we all rotate through the roles, and yes non nursing personel give drugs...under the physcian's license( I don't think that all the docs are aware of that fact) anyway, so someone that does not have an allied health degree but has an RCIS is considered just as good as the nurse standing next to me. Interesting huh?
    riyasonline4all likes this.
  5. Visit  CCL RN profile page
    0
    I'm not a fan of being replaced by someone without a license. Luckily for me, we ONLY employ RTs (rad tech) and RNs. No EMTs, resp therapists, or PCTs. The RNs can rotate through all the roles but only an RN can circulate.
  6. Visit  Rangerjoe profile page
    0
    I'm a fire/medic that works in a cath lab. The nurses and RT's haven't been required to take the RCIS test, yet. The lab has 1 medic and two fire/medics. I'm the only one that works PRN. The others work full-time there and full time in the fire dept. They don't have any kids and must not get along with their wives. The other two medics have been there alittle longer then I have (2 yrs) and were recently required to get their RCIS. They took it about 6 months ago and passed. I have to take it by September of next year. Tall order since I plan to be in nursing school then. Everyone in the labs is required to be able to do all three jobs and as of last year will not hire anyone that doesn't already have RCIS. In practice though, the RT's usually scrub or monitor while the medics and RN's will do all three. Only two RT's, so it isn't bad. We have a small dept, 3 labs. One EP, one cardiac and one cardiac/perph.
  7. Visit  Aneroo profile page
    0
    Nurses are encouraged to get a certification, but it doesn't have to be RCIS. RT's are encouraged to obtain their RCIS.
  8. Visit  PrincessPiff profile page
    1
    Quote from inthelab
    I think that if you are non nursing it is a 2 part test, but nursing it is one part. The lab I work in is trying to strong arm everyone into taking it. I would rather take the CCRN or some certification that is specific to nursing. This allows Radtechs,CVTs,Resp therapist, and I think anyone who is grandfathered into the cath lab if you do not have an allied health degree to be RCIS certified. I was hoping to see the benefit in taking this test... I work in a lab where there are a good mixture of talents. Everyone can do everyone else's job, so we all rotate through the roles, and yes non nursing personel give drugs...under the physcian's license( I don't think that all the docs are aware of that fact) anyway, so someone that does not have an allied health degree but has an RCIS is considered just as good as the nurse standing next to me. Interesting huh?
    Sounds like my lab was. I left there nearly 3 years ago, mainly because anybody off the street who walked into the lab was mixing and giving drugs, supposedly under the doctor's license. We had one girl who was a patient transporter who became a tech!!! After seeing many non-nursing personnel make SERIOUS drug errors, I was scared to death. One girl mixed adenosine in a 1 mL syringe when it was supposed to go into a liter bag of NS, and pretty much refused to acknowledge she messed up, even after 30 seconds of asystole and the MD going WHAT DID YOU JUST GIVE ME???

    Anyway, I got off topic. Yes, our management was attempting to strong arm everyone into taking RCIS. They were going to reimburse you once you passed the exam, which many people didn't. I never attempted.
    CCL RN likes this.
  9. Visit  EmilyCCRN profile page
    1
    Holy cow! I would NOT want to be a patient in a lab where non-RNs are allowed to mix and give drugs.

    To answer the OP's question, no, we are not required to take the RCIS. The CCRN is a more popular choice for us, although my hospital does give incentive pay for the CCRN or RCIS to CVL RNs.
    CCL RN likes this.
  10. Visit  zdiddy44 profile page
    0
    Quote from EmilyCCRN
    Holy cow! I would NOT want to be a patient in a lab where non-RNs are allowed to mix and give drugs.

    To answer the OP's question, no, we are not required to take the RCIS. The CCRN is a more popular choice for us, although my hospital does give incentive pay for the CCRN or RCIS to CVL RNs.

    Emily...I have trouble with your above statement. Let me give you an example. I've spent over 10 years in the medical field. 2 of which was spent in the US Army as a combat medic! As a combat medic I treated many different types of battlefield and inpatient casualties. I've also given every medication under the sun. I've also had 7 years of Cath Lab experience. I know every cardiac medicine including the chemistry, dosage, indication, contraindication, compatablities, etc. To hear you say something so foolish really strikes a chord with me. I don't think you realize how juvenile the nursing profession is.

    I'm not dismissing the importance of nurses, or the need for them for that matter, but a nurse is probably the last person I want to see push a med in me. There is a huge lack of education at the multiple facilities I have been to. I'm sorry but having a 2 year degree, doing a couple clinical rotations, and passing an easier board exam (NCLEX) does not make you or any nurse a medical superhero...medince administrator of all, if you will. Now regardless of your degree, wheter it be AS OR BS is besides the point. I'd put my 10 years of experience up again a nurse with 40 years experience. I'd put any of my collegues experience to that same match.

    You really should open your eyes to these things
    Last edit by zdiddy44 on Jun 30, '11
  11. Visit  zdiddy44 profile page
    0
    At my facility, they are not required at this time.

    Througout the mid-west region, it is slowly becoming a standard. Over time, CCI (the board who backs cardiovascular credentials) is trying to mandate all cath lab people become RCIS. I think it's proper in that is sets a level ground for an education base in the Cath Lab. To the person who says RCIS is an alternative to having a degree...you're wrong. RCIS is an international credential and licensure. It is not a certificate; it is not a replacement for a degree; it's not a state license, it's an international licensure and registration. The scope of practice can be viewed SICP.com. Yes, as much as it will kill you nurses, RCIS people can and do administer medication. Yes this is legal. No, your state doesn't mandate otherwise. It's your hospital or unions that set these bogus rules.

    Medicare is starting to refuse to pay for serivces of non credentialed people. Although nurses are credentialed as an "RN", they still don't have the RCIS credential. Medicare, in the future, will probably try to get cheap on hospitals and not pay unless people are credentialed in the job they do. Is it right? That's your opinion. It's happening in other realms of the health care service industry, and no doubt will continue to happen.

    So my suggestion, nurse or not, is to try to challenge the test. It is difficult but do-able. I'm highly suggesting that anyone who has not had a formal education in cardiology take this exam by 2013. After 2013, CCI mandates that all candidates for the RCIS exam go through a formal 2 year cardiovascular training program.

    I am not spouting off my opinions as this information is all factual. You can verify this at cci-online.org - sicp.com - acp-online.org
  12. Visit  zdiddy44 profile page
    0
    PS...no matter what your background is, at this point the RCIS is a one part exam....PERIOD! The only people who have the 2 part exam are candidates who applied before 2011; these, most likely, are people who have attemted the exam before and were unsuccessful. The 2 part exam was a cardiac science exam and the RCIS itself. Now it is all rolled into 1.
  13. Visit  zdiddy44 profile page
    0
    Quote from inthelab
    I think that if you are non nursing it is a 2 part test, but nursing it is one part. The lab I work in is trying to strong arm everyone into taking it. I would rather take the CCRN or some certification that is specific to nursing. This allows Radtechs,CVTs,Resp therapist, and I think anyone who is grandfathered into the cath lab if you do not have an allied health degree to be RCIS certified. I was hoping to see the benefit in taking this test... I work in a lab where there are a good mixture of talents. Everyone can do everyone else's job, so we all rotate through the roles, and yes non nursing personel give drugs...under the physcian's license( I don't think that all the docs are aware of that fact) anyway, so someone that does not have an allied health degree but has an RCIS is considered just as good as the nurse standing next to me. Interesting huh?

    RRT's, RT(R), and most CVT's have an allied health degree...Radiology and respiratory therapy are at the associates level as well as cardiovascular technician.

    Also, nurses give medicine under the physicians license. No nurse has the ability to prescribe or give medicine unless under the direct order of a physician. Yes, doctors are aware of this fact.

    And an RCIS person and a nurse are two different thing. RCIS is specialized in cardiovascular; an RN has no speciality; you can't compare them. In the realm of cardiology...the RN is no where close to knowledge base or skill set of the average RCIS professional.
  14. Visit  harley007 profile page
    2
    I was educated as a RN 38 years ago and I completed an AS/Diploma program. I didn't take the NCLEX as a nurse educated that long ago took a 5 part - 2 day long state board of examination to qualify as a Registered Nurse. My clinical rotations involved hundreds of clinical hours as the AS/Diploma was a 3 year program with only one week off each summer. Even on the days we attended our college classes the local university we were required to return to the hospital for afternoons of clinical instruction or additional hours of clinical experience. Our endless clinical hours always included an instructor breathing down your back every second. By our last portion of our third year we weekly administered medications for an entire "floor" of 44 patients and were constantly verbally questioned on each medication given. We were required to spend 3 months on site at a large psychiatric hospital and a month's rotation at a rehabilitation facility. Before I completed my RN program I had already graduated and worked as an LPN. Once again the LPN program was a non-stop clinical and classroom experience including working evenings and nights while attending regular classes - Yes, back then we were actually used as hospital staff. So let me see, that would make me an RN with 40 years experience as a nurse including working in the ER, ICU and the last 10 years in the Cath. Lab which has been the specialty closest to my "heart". Our interventional lab runs four rooms and averages about 25+ patients a day. With a very, very rare exception, our STEMI times meet the national standards 100% of the time. We are always involved in numerous studies, run a separate large EP Dept. and are always the first lab in a multi-state area to use the newest stent, balloon etc. THREE of my five children are on active military duty and all of them are advanced trained corpsman. I am quite aware of their intense training and the responsibility these three have at sea or on the battle field. But, my education's advantage is it's more broad based and all specialty inclusive. Although I love working with any passionate Cath. Lab team member from RCIS, RT, Paramedic, etc., etc. I still feel that only a RN should be administering medications. It's not only the knowledge of the medications but the total patient care including issues that involve other specialties. I know you as much as I are still amazed at the unusual conditions that our patients surprise us with that affect their care aside from their CVD. That is where I feel my broader based education has an advantage. I graduated high school at 16 & even with 40 years of being a nurse I still jog like a maniac. So I'll can certainly match you or your colleagues and run you down in or out of the lab. Alright my dear enough said. Please keep your wonderful passion for the Cath. Lab but remember to play nice & no generalizations!
    armyicurn and AbakRN like this.

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