UBC nursing vs. U of T nursing

  1. 0
    Hey everyone,

    congratulations to everyone who has been accepted to schools already and I've got my fingers crossed for everyone who is waiting!

    I recently got into U of T as well as been invited for an interview at UBC. I'm very conflicted about where to choose and I would love some input from anyone who knows about these programs or even just about one of them.. pros...cons.. etc?

    Thanks!

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 0
    Go where ever is cheaper for you, you'll be an RN either way and both UBC and Uoft are considered great schools so either way you'd win out.
    However, I' m currently in the UofT program (1st year) so if you have specific questions feel free.
  4. 0
    I've also been accepted to both! I'm really torn between the two. If anyone has some insights/opinions regarding both programs, I would really appreciate it!
  5. 0
    I'm in the same boat! I was completely set on UBC since I didn't think I stood a chance at getting into U of T, but now I've been accepted to both and don't know what to do.

    I seem to have more information about the U of T program: I know it's very lecture-based and a little less practical. It prepares its students well for fields other than just bedside nursing, such as research and academia, and puts more focus on advanced nursing practices such as nurse practitioner, etc. It also provides lots of contacts to diverse workplaces and has strong connections with many leading hospitals in Toronto's core.

    I don't have a whole lot of information on UBC's program, however. There isn't very much to go by from their website and I don't know of anyone personally who has gone through the program. Does anyone else have any specific info on UBC? Have you guys made any decisions yet?
  6. 0
    strategically, I wouldn't go to either. UofT and UBC are probably one of the highest ranked universities, what does that tell you about the student population? - it's full of keeners and gunners this will hurt your chances of getting into grad school if that's what you're aiming for. right now you've probably graduated in 90th percentile of your class, as soon as you attend UofT your grades will tank as UofT is notorious for using bell curves. your 80s will now probably equate for 60s at UofT. My advice? Get your degree from a university that is lecture based and more hands on - in the world of nursing no one will bat their eyes twice when they see that you went to UofT/UBC. im not trying to scare you just food for thought
  7. 0
    Well... I graduated with a BSc from McGill, so I'm already used to this type of schooling. If anything, UBC would be easier than where I'm coming from, so this isn't really the issue for me nor do I really look at it that way anyways. I'm always up for a challenge anyhow.

    I would just like to know more about the program itself. If anyone has any personal experiences from UBC's nursing program, please share! Thanks
  8. 1
    Quote from helterskelter22
    strategically, I wouldn't go to either. UofT and UBC are probably one of the highest ranked universities, what does that tell you about the student population? - it's full of keeners and gunners this will hurt your chances of getting into grad school if that's what you're aiming for. right now you've probably graduated in 90th percentile of your class, as soon as you attend UofT your grades will tank as UofT is notorious for using bell curves. your 80s will now probably equate for 60s at UofT. My advice? Get your degree from a university that is lecture based and more hands on - in the world of nursing no one will bat their eyes twice when they see that you went to UofT/UBC. im not trying to scare you just food for thought

    Absolutely not true, im a first year at Uoft Nursing and of the 8 courses so far the entire program has taken, the lowest course average is 77% -everyone is either a b+ student or higher. The Faculty of Nursing at Uoft is its own body and the grading policies are different than that of other faculties- they are nowhere near as strict.
    bintdee likes this.
  9. 0
    Hi! I graduated from UBC Nursing this past April. I wanted to provide some info on the program

    Similarly to how UofT was described above, I also found UBC to be very based in theory, although they do a fairly good job of trying to balance out the clinical/practical component. I was very lucky in that I got wonderful clinical placements in Vancouver where I learned a lot (not all of my peers were so lucky, it's luck of the draw basically). UBC also has "thread" courses that focus on ethics, leadership, research and relational practice that you take throughout the program in addition to clinical-based courses and lectures (maternity, mental health, med-surg, etc). Aka they also want you to explore non-bedside nursing and really want their students to consider an MSN!

    What helterskelter22 said above is also completely untrue for UBC....the class averages are HIGH, not low. Their are some keeners but for the most part I loved my classmates and everyone is really supportive of each other. Like all programs, the school has its pros and cons but I would overall recommend the program. Its 20 months!!! And I got a job out of it. You will too no matter what school you decide.

    Best of luck in your decision
  10. 0
    Thank you so much for the info! So happy to finally get some inside information on the UBC program and also happy to hear that both U of T and UBC's programs are doable.

    Sunship88 if you have a minute could you explain what you mean when you say not all of your peers were so lucky in their placements? How were their experiences unfavorable? I've heard that sometimes UBC nursing students have to travel quite far for their placements, what are your thoughts on this? Thanks again!
  11. 0
    Usually at one point all students in the BSN program will have to travel to placements in the suburbs (Richmond, Surrey, North Shore to name a few). It's not too bad if you have a car. If you don't, most hospitals are easily accessible by public transit. The school tries to match placements to where students live, but it can be tricky.

    Another issue can be level of acuity of some of the placements. There are other nursing schools in Vancouver, all wanting clinical placements for their students. Sometimes demand can exceed supply, and a couple of my classmates felt they were getting less-acute placements then they would like (such as for medicine and pediatrics). Less acuity can mean less learning opportunities. But generally speaking I feel most people were happy with their clinicals. There's a lot to learn no matter what unit you are on

    The above problems I feel could apply to any school of nursing in a large urban centre


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top