Straight into BScN or do RPN to RN bridge?

  1. Hello everyone,

    I'm very conflicted as I am in the midst of deciding where I will be going to school. I've accepted my offer to the University of Ottawa for BScN but I've also recieved an email from George Brown College for Practical Nursing. I live in the GTA area and would prefer to remain in the Toronto/GTA area- which is the reason why I feel so conflicted about where I want to go for school. I was thinking about doing the RPN to RN bridge after completing the 2 year Practical Nurse degree, but figured it would be best to have some research done on it first before deciding. Is there anyone here who has taken the bridging program? What were your thoughts and was it difficult to gain entry into bridging after graduating from RPN? The BScN program at uOttawa is 4 years while the RPN + Bridging is 4.5 years. Any comments and feedback would be much appreciated!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   GBC_Student
    Having done the rpn program at gbc and currently in the midst of the bridge I wish I had just gone ahead and done the BScN. That said a move to a new city is a big decision.

    If you do the rpn program you may not be willing to instantly go onto the bridge. I know I wasn't. I worked for a couple years before coming back to school. One thing that is nice about doing the rpn program and then going onto the rn program is when you become an rn you'll have a better understanding of the nurses you work with and the divisions you may find when RNs and RPN's work together.

    I'm personally not a bit fan of gbc. I have a hate hate relationship with the school. But they do a decent job of preparing you for the job. And due to the level of disorganization at gbc you'll get a taste of the sometimes unfair nature of working in Healthcare.
  4. by   ai064
    Quote from GBC_Student
    Having done the rpn program at gbc and currently in the midst of the bridge I wish I had just gone ahead and done the BScN. That said a move to a new city is a big decision.

    If you do the rpn program you may not be willing to instantly go onto the bridge. I know I wasn't. I worked for a couple years before coming back to school. One thing that is nice about doing the rpn program and then going onto the rn program is when you become an rn you'll have a better understanding of the nurses you work with and the divisions you may find when RNs and RPN's work together.

    I'm personally not a bit fan of gbc. I have a hate hate relationship with the school. But they do a decent job of preparing you for the job. And due to the level of disorganization at gbc you'll get a taste of the sometimes unfair nature of working in Healthcare.
    Hey there! Thank you so much for the quick reply My ultimate goal is to become a Nurse Practitioner so I know that I will be doing the bridge 100% straight after the RPN program (if that's the route i end up deciding on). Was it difficult to gain entry into the bridging program? If you don't mind me asking, what was the GPA you were accepted with? And what was the practical nursing program like? Sorry i'm asking so many questions; I'm just wanting to make sure I know every little bit of detail before coming to a final decision. This whole research bit also gives me a better look at the differences between RPN/RN and the school programs.
  5. by   GBC_Student
    Not a problem. My rpn GPA ended up being a 3.0 on the dot. Patho and pharmacology pulled me way down.

    I'm not sure if I had a leg up getting into the gbc bridge because I had done my rpn there or because the check cleared but I had no issues.

    The rpn program can be pretty stressful after first semester. There is a lot of work and a ton of reading. My understanding from some of our instructors is the current rpn program is really just a compressed version of the old 3 year rn diploma with a few courses shaved off. If you do the rpn program you will be very very busy.

    Most of the courses aren't that hard but patho like, pharmacology and nursing theory can be pretty tough.

    There is a lot of stress doing the program and a really high attrition rate. I started the program with 160 people. By second semester it was down to 90. By third it was probably about 65. I think I finished with about 55 other people.

    My understanding is the rn program is a bit less difficult because it's spread over four years. Not that it won't be a challenge. If you're planning on doing the Np program I don't think it would matter which path you take.

    If you do the rpn first it's nice because you can work a bit while doing the bridge which is always good to have on a resume.

    Id probably go the BScN route just to save the time. But either is fine.
  6. by   Khow89
    RPN + bridge is 5 years at least. If you have the money, do the bscn because you save 1 year. What's nice doing the rpn first is that tuition is cheaper and that if you decide that nursing isn't for you, you won't lose as much money.
  7. by   Kayla17Nurse
    From what I've researched, if you're planning to do the BScN bridge immediately after the PN program you might as well just start with the BScN program. The bridging programs I've looked into have all required the applicant to hold their RPN license, therefore you'll have to write the CNO exam and pass before being able to start the bridge.

    If your goal is to get your BScN without actually practicing as an RPN, I personally don't see any point of doing the PN program then bridging.
  8. by   22NM
    I hope any and everyone who is asking the same question comes across my answer because it can make or break your aspirations of ever being a RN.

    I too wanted to get my degree in nursing. I was accepted to George Brown College and went ahead and took that route. Upon complete of the program I found out the hard way how hard it is to get accepted into the bridging program because it is very competitive. Even with a 3.0 GPA I didn't get accepted. And I know what you're thinking, you can maybe retake a course or two and apply again for January... well no. First things first George Brown only offers the birding program starting in September, and because the program fills up so fast as is so competitive they accept applications from newly graduate and then students applying based off of grades and GPA.. so you have to have AMAZING grade in all four semester.

    By going into the degree program, once you're accepted and can make it to the end you've already won. I also have many friends that complete the degree program (BsCN) and were able to find jobs right away. I graduated the RPN program in 2016 and am still having very hard time finding a decent paying job.

    Good luck to whomever is reading this and I truly hope you go into the degree program and don't get trapped like I did.

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