CRNE June 2012 - page 9

Anyone started to prepare for CRNE June 2012?... Read More

  1. 0
    What at 1.5 she's done. How could it be?

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  2. 1
    Quote from bella.donna
    The exam was multiple puzzle,hard to say it was MCQ...they pretend to ask us smth,we pretened to give the answer...very dissapointing!
    Pardon me, what?
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from janfrn
    Pardon me, what?
    second that
  4. 0
    Quote from mapleleafcn
    what is the difference between no CPR and do not resuscitate request? Any samaritan nurse out there to explain. Thanks in advance?
    I just learned that no CPR and DNR are just the same.

    "When a capable client doesn't want to have CPR performed the refusal must be documented by the physician. Some provincial legislation allows nurses to accept the refusal for CPR and document the refusal in the client's health record as Do Not Resuscitate (DNR)."

    Cardiopulmunary Resuscitation, Mosby's Comprehensive Review for Nurses


    Anyone else who can clarify this?
  5. 0
    no cpr and dnr are not exactly the same thing. there are as many permutations of "do not resuscitate" as there are stars in the sky... or almost. for example, a person might agree to cpr but not to defibrillation. they might agree to no cpr but want cardioactive drugs (epinephrine, vasopressin, adenosine, calcium, bicarb). they might agree to cpr and defibrillation but no drugs. they might be okay with cardioactive drugs by infusion but not as a bolus. or cpr but not intubation. where i work, we see many, many variations. our "dnr" orders are usually written:

    1. no chest compressions
    2. do not intubate
    3. no cardioactive drugs by iv push
    4. no defibrillation
    may escalate existing cardioactive infusions to a maximum of 1 mcg/kg/min
    may give fluid boluses to maximum of 100 ml/kg
  6. 0
    Quote from janfrn
    No CPR and DNR are not exactly the same thing. There are as many permutations of "do not resuscitate" as there are stars in the sky... or almost. For example, a person might agree to CPR but not to defibrillation. They might agree to no CPR but want cardioactive drugs (epinephrine, vasopressin, adenosine, calcium, bicarb). They might agree to CPR and defibrillation but no drugs. They might be okay with cardioactive drugs by infusion but not as a bolus. Or CPR but not intubation. Where I work, we see many, many variations. Our "DNR" orders are usually written:

    1. No chest compressions
    2. Do not intubate
    3. No cardioactive drugs by IV push
    4. No defibrillation
    May escalate existing cardioactive infusions to a maximum of 1 mcg/kg/min
    May give fluid boluses to maximum of 100 mL/kg
    Great! thanks for clarifying that. that really helped a lot. At least it's clear now. Thanks so much janfrn! Appreciate this.
  7. 0
    The correct answer is 4, elevate his legs. The key words here are "independent nursing action...limit spread ankle edema."
    Rationale: 1.The nurse cannot restrict fluids alone..an MD order is needed. 2. Elastic bandages cover wounds and are effective in immobilizing joints/extremeties...they are not compression stockings. Besides, assuming that a pt with heart failure is elderly, would you count on them to apply elastic bandages alone and correctly? 3. Range of motion exercises prevent contractures and promote mobilization. With depended edema, the correct exercise would be ankle pumps. When a patient has right-sided heart failure (i.e. cor pulmonale), you would definitely see manifestations of dependent edema. So to keep them from getting worse (exacerbation), you must remind the patient to sit with legs elevated at all times and to pump those ankles!
  8. 0
    Quote from nursevitals
    The correct answer is 4, elevate his legs. The key words here are "independent nursing action...limit spread ankle edema."
    Rationale: 1.The nurse cannot restrict fluids alone..an MD order is needed. 2. Elastic bandages cover wounds and are effective in immobilizing joints/extremeties...they are not compression stockings. Besides, assuming that a pt with heart failure is elderly, would you count on them to apply elastic bandages alone and correctly? 3. Range of motion exercises prevent contractures and promote mobilization. With depended edema, the correct exercise would be ankle pumps. When a patient has right-sided heart failure (i.e. cor pulmonale), you would definitely see manifestations of dependent edema. So to keep them from getting worse (exacerbation), you must remind the patient to sit with legs elevated at all times and to pump those ankles!
    I agree! Good rationalization nursevitals!
  9. 0
    Right side heart failure, the client's heart fails to pump and receive enough vol of blood to the lungs and from circulatory system. By elevating the legs, it helps drain the circulatory syst fluid load back to the heart, it is different from systemic heart failure in which both sides of the heart is fully congested and the management will be targeted at lower the fluid load of the heart, so you don't position your clients legs higher than heart in systemic heart failure. I hope this will help with questions read earlier.
  10. 0
    When do people typically start getting the resuls mailed?


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