UC CNA Non-member dues

  1. For a variety of reasons I choose not to be a member of CNA. I do not object to paying the "agency fee" but have felt the information sent by CNA justifying the fee to be lacking. Are there any UC Non-member RNs who agree?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    Not from Cali, just curious what did you feel was lacking if you don't object to paying it anyways?
  4. by   Fairshare
    The non-member dues are supposed to only pay for the costs of union representation for UC RNs and not for other units or political activity. The information provided is suposed to explain this. To avoid giving me more detail, CNA has refunded all the fees paid by me.
    I don't think this solves the problem for anyone else who may think the fee is excessive.
  5. by   youngRNstudent
    As a soon-to-be RN who will be working at a UC hospital, can you list a few of your reasons why you chose not to be in the CNA? What are the benefits/downsides to being in it? I know the non-agency fee is like 75% of the agency fee. Please if you could give me a few reasons it would be helpful, as I will have to make that decision soon!
  6. by   Fairshare
    Quote from youngRNstudent
    As a soon-to-be RN who will be working at a UC hospital, can you list a few of your reasons why you chose not to be in the CNA? What are the benefits/downsides to being in it? I know the non-agency fee is like 75% of the agency fee. Please if you could give me a few reasons it would be helpful, as I will have to make that decision soon!
    Sorry for the delay, I was away at a conference.
    There are no downsides for me not being a member of CNA. I choose not be a member because I believe CNA is too political and expresses positions on issues not involved with RNs or healthcare. I still benefit from the union representation in the system. I am not against agency fees but believe the amount far exceeds a reasonable amount for the non-political activities of CNA.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    To each his or her own.

    Advantages of membership include being able to vote on issues and to vote for the leaders of the organization. All members may attend Board of Director meetings and participate in discussions.
    Scholarships are available to members.

    CNA got the first ever safe staffing legislation, whistleblower protection for acute care staff, the Nurse Title law (only an RN or LVN may use the title "NURSE"). If you are curious or want information to help make a choice here are some links:

    http://www.calnurse.org
    http://www.calnurse.org/finalrat/ratio7103.html
    http://www.calnurses.org/cna/np/
    http://www.calnurses.org/cna/ce/
    http://www.calnurse.org/gr/grleg04.html
    http://www.calnurses.org/cna/news/cna.htm
    http://cna.igc.org/cna101/profassoc.htm

    Professional Association and RN Union

    CNA is an independent nurses organization with a proud history. It is governed by a 30-member elected Board of Directors, all of whom are direct care Registered Nurses. CNA represents 57,000 RNs in 164 facilities across California.

    Nursing Practice
    Nursing Practice provides continuing education programs, and monitors professional practice issues and trends affecting bedside RNs. The department provides training and is a resource to the CNA contract mandated Professional Practice Committees (PPC) in each facility to ensure that nursing practice laws and regulations are observed.

    Government Relations
    Government Relations oversees legislative issues affecting RN licensure, practice, staffing, etc. There are legislative specialists and RN lobbyists in Sacramento.

    Collective Bargaining
    Collective bargaining provides the legal authority and power to engage in patient advocacy actions on a collective basis with a unified RN voice. CNA labor representatives assist nurses working under CNA collective bargaining contracts, working closely with the Nurse Representatives and CNA committees in the facility on contract negotiations and compliance.

    Organizing
    Since 2001, over 12,300 RNs at 36 hospitals successfully organized with CNA. CNA membership has doubled in seven years.

    Record numbers of RNs are organizing due to the lowering of patient care standards and not having a voice in decisions affecting their practice and their patients. The more RNs are represented by CNA, the more effectively we can fight to improve patient care standards.
  8. by   Fairshare
    I suspect Spacenurse is a bit biased.
    Glad everyone can have an opinion.
    Please note every site offered is a CNA site.

    CNA is neither a wholly good or bad organization.
    It has its good points as well as its flaws.
    With respect to agency fees, I have found CNA to be less than honest.

    Joining is in option for UC nurses.
    Try it, you may like it.
  9. by   youngRNstudent
    Thank you both for your replies, I have never been involved or had the opportunity to be involved in a union and I will be looking into this!

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