Samuel Merritt ABSN Intensity Questions - page 2

How intensive is an ABSN program? I'm applying to Samuel Merritt College in N. California and was wondering how often and how long are classes? Also, how much time do you spend studying outside of... Read More

  1. by   Rianna1
    I start at the SF location in April and am mentally preparing myself for the next year. The posts have been great to read. What is the earliest you have to be at clinicals? I heard/read that sometimes clinicals are on weekends and/or evening shifts. How are those shifts for you guys? We have two little ones at home and I actually wouldn't mind the later shifts now and even the weekend shifts. Jzzy, do you live in SF or do you commute?
  2. by   teensmom
    Yes, you can have shifts from 3-11pm, usually 3 days a week. For some reason I found that shift really hard, I could not wake up at a decent hour because it took me so long to fall asleep after clinical. I much prefer the 7am-3pm shift. I have also worked weekends, which I don't mind-it seems about the same as during the week. We haven't done any clinicals on holidays. I have an older daughter that I don't see if I work the weekends but she is handling it well.

    T
  3. by   crisbiss
    Hey there,

    I'm sure there are lots of similarities between the campuses, but also differences. Is there anyone who can speak about the Oakland campus?

    Thanks!
  4. by   amzyRN
    Quote from Rianna1
    I start at the SF location in April and am mentally preparing myself for the next year. The posts have been great to read. What is the earliest you have to be at clinicals? I heard/read that sometimes clinicals are on weekends and/or evening shifts. How are those shifts for you guys? We have two little ones at home and I actually wouldn't mind the later shifts now and even the weekend shifts. Jzzy, do you live in SF or do you commute?
    I do clinicals three days per week, thurs, fri, sat, from 3-11 pm (it's been changed from 2-10pm. I have to commute to marin. Sf campus is easy for me to get to by bart, b/c I live in the city. I can't wait till this schedule is over, It totally sucks to have clinical on the weekend, but I can tough it out for 3 more weeks,

    J
  5. by   Rianna1
    how often do your clinicals change? have you ever had to do overnights or is 3-11 the lastest shift you had to do?
  6. by   amzyRN
    we never do night shift, i.e. overnight. clinicals change by rotating priority based on last name. there are better schedules, i just was last pick this time. hopefully next time, no weekends, and i'd like to try day shift.
  7. by   lagoniadolce
    For teensmom: I recently had a baby and am thinking of becoming a nurse. He will probably be around 2 when I get into the program.. so my question is will daycare be an ok way to have my baby watched or will I need a family member that can take him at a drop of a hat? My husband will be providing for me so I wont be working but sometimes he works nights.. Does the program give sufficient notice to allow for someone to watch my baby.. also I won't be working.. I am just really nervous about the program I guess.

    Also, is paying 48,000 dollars plus books worth it? Is it the amount of time that is saved by doing the ABSN vs. a 3 year state school.. or is it that it's harder to get in to cheaper programs?

    Thanks in advance everyone. Hope this made sense.
  8. by   Rianna1
    lagoniadolce,
    i am in the SF location and we had orientation last week. we were told that there may be times when clinicals will change at the very last moment. we were told to be expected to be flexible. I have two young children and my advice to you would be to have backups. My youngest, who will be 2 in a few months will be in preschool. I also have my mom, my cousin and third "backup" just in case.
  9. by   teensmom
    You do need to be flexible, but most of the time we know our schedule somewhat ahead of time. Also, our clinicals can be on weekends, days or evenings. You probably won't need a babysitter full-time unless you need one for the time you need to study. Once we had to change clinicals at the last minute because the instructor never showed up. You could have a regular babysitter but a back-up person or two would be a lifesaver sometimes.

    For me, I figured the cost of the program was worth it because I would be making money so much sooner, I'd be able to pay it back. Also, with the way the economy is going more people will be going back to school since they may be laid off and nursing schools may get more impacted which means the wait may get even longer. Public schools will be the most impacted of course.

    I am really loving nursing school but I have talked to other people in different cohorts who are not with a good group of students. Our class really works together to make sure everyone is taken care of, we have study groups, we have birthday celebrations, we celebrate when we have passed a hard class, we stick together. It really makes a difference.

    Good luck in your decision!
  10. by   amzyRN
    Quote from lagoniadolce
    For teensmom: I recently had a baby and am thinking of becoming a nurse. He will probably be around 2 when I get into the program.. so my question is will daycare be an ok way to have my baby watched or will I need a family member that can take him at a drop of a hat? My husband will be providing for me so I wont be working but sometimes he works nights.. Does the program give sufficient notice to allow for someone to watch my baby.. also I won't be working.. I am just really nervous about the program I guess.

    Also, is paying 48,000 dollars plus books worth it? Is it the amount of time that is saved by doing the ABSN vs. a 3 year state school.. or is it that it's harder to get in to cheaper programs?

    Thanks in advance everyone. Hope this made sense.
    Had I to do it over again, I'd try to find a cheaper program. Yes they are harder to get into, but try anyway, b/c the S.F. program is definitely a bit of a burn.
  11. by   Rianna1
    jzzy88, can you elaborate on what you mean by "a bit of a burn?"
  12. by   amzyRN
    The program is not worth the money. It's disorganized (at the extension campuses), clinical experiences vary (some instructors are great, some are not so great), it's more than 48K b/c of supplies, books, transportation, you may have to commute to your clinical sites. The extension campuses are small and you don't have the library access you may have at a larger university. So far, I've had an overall good experience and have learned a lot, but have had a far better experience in my other undergrad university, that was much much cheaper. I just feel that SMC is trying to make as much profit as possible. For 48K and 1 year, I guess my expectations are high. There is a program at MSU that's roughly 20K. I'd try to go for a program like that b/c debt sucks. People in my program are 100K in the hole. I guess you make it back, but considering the difficulty of nursing (it's tough, exhausting work, underpaid for the level of difficulty), paying off the debt sucks.
  13. by   Rianna1
    jzzy88,
    I think there are a lot of students who are not able to move to Maryland (Is that what you meant by MSU?). For those who have mortgages, kids and bills it is difficult to move out of state or even out of the area for a nursing program. Good luck in the rest of your program!

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