Sacramento New Grad RNs.... Are You Having A Difficult Time Landing A Job? - page 5

I was just wondering....... Read More

  1. by   BonnieSc
    The only problems I have with the story is that I'm pretty sure the number of jobs available to new grads is much lower than 120--unless they're counting all the Sutter jobs that claim to be open to new grads, but really aren't--and that nursing home jobs are almost as hard to come by.
  2. by   Kaiserstudent
    agreed Wendy79.


    I graduated in Dec 08. I wonder how long everyone else on here has been loking.
  3. by   expo4u
    I live in St. Louis MO. At least one of the hospitals in the St. Louis area has a hire freeze. The market is tough all over. I was speaking to a manager whom told me the hospital she works at is 7%+ under normal census. Illinois is having problems too. A friend whom is a traveler at an illinois hospital now stated that the hospital he is at, will no longer hire travel nurses in order to save money.
  4. by   nursinguy
    Quote from Wendy79
    Well, I got good grades and even some awards and honors--as far as I can tell, they haven't helped me. What would have helped more was working as an intern or extern during school. There just aren't many jobs posted right now--most of them specify that they want someone who's been working for them.
    Yes, do all your rotations at one hospital, this has helped all my friends that have graduated get jobs over those who insisted the multi-hospital was best experiance for them, yet they still have no job.
  5. by   jjjoy
    Quote from nursinguy
    Yes, do all your rotations at one hospital, this has helped all my friends that have graduated get jobs over those who insisted the multi-hospital was best experiance for them, yet they still have no job.
    We didn't have a choice about what hospitals we had rotations at.
  6. by   CityKat
    Yeh, most of the time, you don't. You can usually list three hospitals and the area in which you want to be placed for your senior practicum, but not your rotations.

    Usually, if you do some clinical rotations at a hospital and you get to know the nursing managers and recruitment officers within the hospital, you have a good chance of being a top pick; if you're standing out! I was offered a position at the hospital where I did my medical surgical clinical rotations and then again at my internship hospital. You just have to force yourself to stand out, but not in an annoying way. Ask lots of questions, become eager to learn, work hard and do well. There's no written in stone way to do it, but you can force yourself to stand out in a group

    Good luck, it took me over a year to find something and that was just this December I found something. I graduate in May 2007.
    It's tough out there, but just be consistent with your phone calls, apply for every job, even the ones you may not fit. You never know, they may like your resume and take you on and spend the money to train you!
  7. by   jjjoy
    Quote from CityKat
    You can usually list three hospitals and the area in which you want to be placed for your senior practicum, but not your rotations.
    Remember that schools can vary a lot. My school didn't have a senior practicum either.
  8. by   nursinguy
    Quote from jjjoy
    We didn't have a choice about what hospitals we had rotations at.
    You were not allowed to switch clinical groups with your classmates?
  9. by   CityKat
    Quote from jjjoy
    Remember that schools can vary a lot. My school didn't have a senior practicum either.
    That's surprising b/c most schools I know of have senior practicums or internships. Your last semester in school, you weren't assigned to a certain area in a hospital and assigned one nurse? It's pretty much a general requirement of the schools I was looking at I looked at about 12 schools. That really sucks your school didn't offer one b/c this is where a lot of independent learning comes from; working one on one for an entire semester with just ONE nurse.

    If you didn't have this, then I don't know what other options you might have in the world of the job market. Usually, most new grads have a good chance of placement at their places of rotations and internships. If you have neither, then I have no idea what you should do
  10. by   jjjoy
    Quote from nursinguy
    You were not allowed to switch clinical groups with your classmates?
    I don't remember anyone switching clinical groups, but we generally all had our rotations at the same local facilities, just on different units or we'd swap half way through the term. For inpatient clinicals, only critical care rotations were at variable locations where we had some choice and had to jostle a bit for preferred locations & experiences. Critical care was the only rotation where we worked one-on-one with a nurse, as opposed to working under the direction of our clinical instructor, shared with the other students on the floor. But we generally had no more than two shifts on one unit as we rotated through various speciality units.

    I always find it interesting to compare different nursing school experiences. There is quite a bit of variability between programs. From what pre-reqs are required for admission to how care plans are used and graded to how many patients a student is expected to handle by their last term... it can vary a lot!
  11. by   NickiLaughs
    There are a variety of styles of nursing schools, and there is no requirement to offer a "preceptorship" where you are assigned to follow one nurse at a specific location on a unit for a while. I believe it's about a 50/50 average of preceptorships. Some view it as useful as to getting a job offer, others view it as pointless because of new grad programs. I had a preceptorship, but it was at the VA, and they were having a hiring freeze so it didn't do me any good anyway.
  12. by   nursinguy
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    There are a variety of styles of nursing schools, and there is no requirement to offer a "preceptorship" where you are assigned to follow one nurse at a specific location on a unit for a while. I believe it's about a 50/50 average of preceptorships. Some view it as useful as to getting a job offer, others view it as pointless because of new grad programs. I had a preceptorship, but it was at the VA, and they were having a hiring freeze so it didn't do me any good anyway.
    A classmate a semester ahead just got hired at the VA becuase he interned their and they loved him, despite a so-called hiring freeze people are still getting hired. It is not what you know but rather who you know and what they think of you.
  13. by   youknowho
    It doesn't really matter who has senior preceptorships and who doesn't or if you can do all your clinicals at one place. Even if you do and do a marvelous job, it doesn't mean they will hire you. I thought the main point of this thread was that there just isnt the New Grad positions out there, period. And if there are you are competing with HUNDREDS of equally qualified nurses.

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