RN vs. BSN

  1. 0
    I really want to get into the Nursing field asap. I've wasted too much time already and need some advice.

    What's the major difference in work and pay with RN's vs. BSN???

    Also, it's pretty hard getting into an Accelerated BSN here in SoCal so it seems my only choice may be to get the AA RN. Which i would be very happy with if i only knew the difference. I did take some science classes during my Univ stint. Finished with a BA but i still need A & P, and Microbio for the Nursing pre reqs.

    Thanks everybody. I can't wait to get into the field and start working.

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  2. 14 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from sky5403
    I really want to get into the Nursing field asap. I've wasted too much time already and need some advice.

    What's the major difference in work and pay with RN's vs. BSN???

    Also, it's pretty hard getting into an Accelerated BSN here in SoCal so it seems my only choice may be to get the AA RN. Which i would be very happy with if i only knew the difference. I did take some science classes during my Univ stint. Finished with a BA but i still need A & P, and Microbio for the Nursing pre reqs.

    Thanks everybody. I can't wait to get into the field and start working.
    Hi sky5403! Nice to meet you and welcome to allnurses. Here's a link to a really good thread regarding your issue...
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...4&page=1&pp=10

    Basically, there are 3 ways to become a RN. Diploma, Associate degree, and Bachelor's degree. All of these lead to the board exam to become an RN.

    For the most part there is not a difference in pay, skill level or scope of practice for any of these nurses in the same position. Theoretically, BSN nurses have more training for management positions, which would pay more.

    Do a search of the site and you will find tons of information and lots of different opinions.

    Good luck with your education!
  4. 0
    Anyone who completes a nursing program & then passes the NCLEX becomes an RN. Your title "RN vs. BSN" doesn't make sense, for a BSN is one route to the RN licensure, as are AA and diploma programs.

    There's really no benefit in taking one route over another. The licensure is what really matters in obtaining employment. There is no pay difference. I got the BSN b/c it was easy for me to transfer into the program at the Junior level (thus only 2 years required to graduate). I would have chosen the AA if it had been a shorter route, though.
  5. 0
    "there's really no benefit in taking one route over another. the licensure is what really matters in obtaining employment. there is no pay difference."


    the above information is not entirely accurate. it's true that after taking any of the three routes (adn, diploma or bsn), all rn wanabees have to pass the same test (nclex-rn) and, if they pass, they will all be registered nurses with the same type of license. it is not true that there is no benefit in taking one route over another. what is true is that the benefits don't directly relate to obtaining your rn licensure. i'll get back to that in a minute.

    licensure is what matters in obtaining employment in the sense that without your rn license, you obviously can't be hired as an rn. however, some employers specifiy "bsn preferred" or "bsn required" in their ads. it depends on the type of job you want and the hiring conditions in the geographical area you are looking. some hospitals "prefer" a bsn but know that realistically, they are going to see a sizable number of diploma and adn grads among their applicants.

    as for pay, many years ago, there was a pay difference. sometimes a large one. that changed as the percentages of adn grads grew. now, it is rare for there to be a pay difference. occasionally, i hear of a hospital that gives a small premium for having a bsn. one place gives bsns $100 a month extra. for a nurse who works full time, that works out to just under $0.60 an hour. most facilities pay nurses according to their specialty and level of experience.

    back to the issue of one route being more beneficial than another. the benefit depends on the type of nursing you are interested in, your long-term goals, the available time and finances, and the other demands on your energy. a bsn is great if you're young, have a good program near you, can afford the tuition (or the loans) and are not juggling too many other things. it's also great if you've gone one of the other routes and have decided to do a completion program.

    if you're a little older, have a family and/or a job, and have to work on your education as time and money permit, i'd recommend the adn. i don't know that much about diploma programs as the last one in our state closed about 15 years ago. the people i know who have graduated from them were very satisfied.

    you need a bsn, not necessarily at the beginning of your career, but by the time you want to get into federal public health nursing or any type of advanced practice like midwifery, crna, or any other type of nurse practioner position. you might need a bsn for some types of higher level management positions although an adn and a ba or mba in business or other related field can be quite attractive. you definitely need a bsn as a stepping stone for the masters degree required for teaching.

    for just about everything else, including lower and middle level management, the diploma or adn degree is usually sufficient.

    the deciding factor is you. what do you want to do? how much time and money do you have to do it? where do you want to be 10-15-20 years from now. what educational background do you have so far? how much patience do you have? what schools are in your area and what kind of waiting list, if any, do they have? all right, that last one isn't technically about you, but it is a factor. once you know the answers to these questions, you should have some idea of where you're headed.

    hope this helps.

    miranda f.


  6. 0
    I started with my AAS and then went on for the BSN, and now I am working on my MSN as a FNP. There is no pay difference. It would not matter which degree you initially received, for it would still be the same NCLEX exam. But, if you want management, education, or other advanced degree, you need the BSN. Just remember, you can take your time. Melinda
  7. 0
    Wow. Thank you all very much!

    Sorry about the Title. Was confused and still a newbie.

    Yeap. I'm 31, married, and have a 6 month old at home. In the real estate field at the moment so i'm free whenever i feel like it. I'm not too worried about my situation. I've heard, read, and known other people with worse case scenario's reaching their goals. Have to stay positive!

    Reason why i asked is a good friend told me it would take about the same time doing the AA vs. the BSN because the programs are so "impacted" here in So Cal. So if the time difference and pay is going to be the same, might as well go for something i was planning on getting later anyways.

    Now with so many Nursing programs being so overcrowded, i wonder how much longer this shortage will be?

    :Melody:
    Last edit by shingo333 on Jul 8, '05
  8. 0
    The other posters have said it all, I just want to say good luck to you and to keep being positive...... You can do it!!!




    Quote from sky5403
    I really want to get into the Nursing field asap. I've wasted too much time already and need some advice.

    What's the major difference in work and pay with RN's vs. BSN???

    Also, it's pretty hard getting into an Accelerated BSN here in SoCal so it seems my only choice may be to get the AA RN. Which i would be very happy with if i only knew the difference. I did take some science classes during my Univ stint. Finished with a BA but i still need A & P, and Microbio for the Nursing pre reqs.

    Thanks everybody. I can't wait to get into the field and start working.
  9. 0
    Quote from sky5403
    Reason why i asked is a good friend told me it would take about the same time doing the AA vs. the BSN because the programs are so "impacted" here in So Cal. So if the time difference and pay is going to be the same, might as well go for something i was planning on getting later anyways.

    Now with so many Nursing programs being so overcrowded, i wonder how much longer this shortage will be?

    :Melody:
    My BSN program was only one semester longer (only the actual nursing program) than the local com. college ASN program. I had several additional prereqs though. I decided to just get it over with.

    As for the "shortage," there really isn't one (IMHO). There is a shortage of nurses who are willing to work in many clinical areas due to staffing issues and work loads. I will probably sound bitter, but most hospitals could be fully staffed if they wanted to be. But, that would cost too much. They'd rather propagate the myth that the reason they're short is there is some kind of "shortage." This goes over better with the public than "we're too cheap to hire enough staff."
  10. 0
    If you are living in the Long Beach area Cal State Long Beach just started expanding the accelerated BSN programs (a different program for people with a degree already and people without). I think they take about 2 years to complete RN and BSN requirements. You might want to check them out.
  11. 0
    My advice would be to apply to as many programs as you can afford (some of those app fees are steep). You may have what one type of program is looking for over another. I know people who got into accelerated programs and big-name universities who got rejected from AA programs for the same semester.


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