pre-nurse student - looking for sound advice

  1. Hi,

    I am in search of a new mid-life profession. I am a young 51 years old and want to follow my heart in being able to help people. For many years I was in Real Estate (for the money) but can no longer see myself there.
    I have been doing research into becoming a LVN. I do not presently have a degree. It appears that by attending a vocational school I can be ready for employement appxy after one year of training. I am considering Meric College and Unitek College.

    I would really appreciate some feedback from anyone out there about these schools and whether or not it would be reasonable to hope that I can find gainful employment.

    Any feedback or insight would be so appreciated. My heart's there --- I'm just worried about being able to secure employment upon finishing school. The schools charge alot of $$---I just want to clarify truth from fiction.

    Thanks Everyone!


    I
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Silverdragon102
    sorry but can't answer your question but wanted to wish you welcome to the site
  4. by   Tweety
    Welcome to Allnurses. Good luck to you in all that you do.

    I'm going to put this thread in the CA nurses forum where you might get more feedback.
  5. by   BonnieSc
    In my opinion, these schools charge too much compared to the salary you are likely to draw as an LVN, especially when a. there are other schooling options available and b. in all honesty, you aren't going to be able to earn as much in return on your investment as someone in her/his 20s or 30s. Have you looked into attending a community college for the LVN? This option isn't available everywhere, but it's fairly common.
  6. by   Suninmyheart
    I did an RN program at 44 years old. My 3 year program cost me about 23,000 in student loans. Half of that supplemented my living expences. Not bad!

    No matter what age I think it is a good investment. After all, you are investing in the rest of your life and there really isn't a monetary value on the rewards and opportunities that can be realized with nursing.

    In Cali I think there is a big difference between and RN and LVN pay. That extra year is way worth it. But in answer to part of your question - yes you will find work in CA as an LVN. Just look at the ads in the Sunday paper or on Craigslist. Being an LVN could be a stepping stone to to some wonderful things and I encourage you to go for it! You could always get your RN later and perhaps your job would even pay for it.

    I don't know anything about thoses programs. I would definately research and look for the cheapest program.

    Good luck
  7. by   amzyRN
    Quote from dukeee
    Hi,

    I am in search of a new mid-life profession. I am a young 51 years old and want to follow my heart in being able to help people. For many years I was in Real Estate (for the money) but can no longer see myself there.
    I have been doing research into becoming a LVN. I do not presently have a degree. It appears that by attending a vocational school I can be ready for employement appxy after one year of training. I am considering Meric College and Unitek College.

    I would really appreciate some feedback from anyone out there about these schools and whether or not it would be reasonable to hope that I can find gainful employment.

    Any feedback or insight would be so appreciated. My heart's there --- I'm just worried about being able to secure employment upon finishing school. The schools charge alot of $$---I just want to clarify truth from fiction.

    Thanks Everyone!


    I
    I would go the community college route. For LVN programs it is usually easier to get into a program than the community college RN programs. I think it is important to follow one's heart at any age. Good luck,J
  8. by   guerrierdelion
    Quote from dukeee
    Hi,

    I am in search of a new mid-life profession. I am a young 51 years old and want to follow my heart in being able to help people. For many years I was in Real Estate (for the money) but can no longer see myself there.
    I have been doing research into becoming a LVN. I do not presently have a degree. It appears that by attending a vocational school I can be ready for employement appxy after one year of training. I am considering Meric College and Unitek College.

    I would really appreciate some feedback from anyone out there about these schools and whether or not it would be reasonable to hope that I can find gainful employment.

    Any feedback or insight would be so appreciated. My heart's there --- I'm just worried about being able to secure employment upon finishing school. The schools charge alot of $$---I just want to clarify truth from fiction.

    Thanks Everyone!


    I
    [FONT="Garamond"]You are welcome to Private Message me if you so desire. I can give you detailed information on one of the schools you are asking about from first hand experience.Cheers,:smiletea2:
  9. by   jjjoy
    When you check local listings for LPNs, you can also consider calling them and asking what kind of experience they want and if they hire new grads. If it matters to you, find out if they work on 8hr shifts or 12hr shifts. In some areas, most LVN jobs are in LTC, not hospitals or medical offices. If that matters to you, best to find out now. Ask the local LPN programs if they have numbers on the jobs of graduates, such as where they report to be working. Can the schools help you make contact with a grad to talk one-on-one about their experience?


    Find out the pay range. I know of one Cal hosp that paid it's CNAs only a little less than a cross-town hospital paid it's LVNs. Compare the LVN pay with other ancillary health care positions to see if it's worth your while to invest so much in LVN training or if you could work in an ancillary position while taking courses towards an RN. If you don't want to waste any time in jumping into the core of nursing, a private LVN program might be the way to go.

    While not all new grads are immediately snapped up (depends on local factors at that time usually), a new nurse should be able to find work within a few months of finishing their program. The hours one is willing to work makes a difference as well as new staff often get the least favorite shifts. And it's worth it to the new nurse to hold for an offer from a good facility so that's one's start in the field is positive.
  10. by   WDWpixieRN
    dukee:

    I started on this path a little sooner than you, but not by much...after 6 years in the IT field, the money I was making became irrelevant to my happiness and need to feel I was making a difference. I spent 2 years, part-time evenings, completing prereqs and waiting admission to a community college. I started last fall at the ripe ol' age of 50 and haven't looked back. I will graduate in May of '08 at 52 years young!!

    I haven't so much as received a sideways glance on campus; I applied for and was hired for a student internship last summer in a local ER (GREAT experience) where they are anxious for me to graduate and pass the NCLEX. I only recently had a pt's husband in clinicals make a comment about my age, lol...it was really rather hilarious. Most people seem to assume I have years of experience.

    Go for it; do a search for "age" or similar terms....you will find that you are a spring chicken compared to those in their late 50's and some 60's making this career change. The only caution would be what has already been said: be very careful about where you go and how much you pay. A little extra time spent to save a lot of money may be worth it in the long run.

    I wish you the best!!

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