Moving to San Francisco from KY

  1. 0
    Hey Guys, I have read through the other discussions and I know it seems repetitive but I need some help. I am currently an RN in the ER in Kentucky. I have been here for 5 years. I traveled to SF on vacation a while back, and fell in love. I want to move to San Francisco and start a new chapter of my life there, however things are VERY different in SF compared to life in KY. A super nice house in KY can be bought for under 200k, and nurses make in the 20-30/hr range; where as that wont get you a cardboard box in San Fran. So my dilemma is how I should go about things. I already have a California license but Im not sure if I can afford somewhere to live in San Francisco until I am working there, yet I dont know how to get a job there if I dont live there....its very complicated! Any suggestions?
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    If you get hired in SF, you can probably find a short term sublet on short notice (on craigslist), and use that time to look for a permanent living space with your new pay. Because of rent control, and the high rents, sublets are pretty common in San Francisco.
    anie10 likes this.
  4. 1
    I moved to San Francisco from the Midwest in 2009. Like you, I made sure I endorsed to a California RN license and certificate to practice as an NP. My most important advice is to never make arrangements to move unless you have a firm job offer. Hospitals in the city and the surrounding area have career websites and it's easy to navigate through job openings. I happen to find a job as a nurse practitioner just by looking online. I do have years of experience from the Midwest and the job opportunity I applied for perfectly suited my qualifications. I am saying this only to warn you that the job market in San Francisco and the Bay Area is saturated with many well qualified applicants so don't feel less worthy if you don't get calls right away.

    Now on to living in San Francisco which is a unique city, unlike any place in the US I've ever been to (though it has qualities you will see in other cities outside the US). One, the city has an overwhelmingly liberal political ideology. You will see that in the way the city handles issues pertaining to public service, city and county ordinances, social services, etc. It is extreme and having considered myself a liberal, I am still at times shocked by what I see here. Two, even though it is a tightly compact city (and county, really), there are distinct neighborhoods that actually bleed into each other. Housing is very expensive as you already know but the trick is finding that neighborhood that suits your needs in terms of budget, the lifestyle you want to live, and the proximity to where you will be working.

    I found that apartment hunting is not an easy task here. One, there is competition from other would be renters especially in desirable neighborhoods and good apartment deals go away fast. Two, without being intimately familiar with the neighborhoods in the city and your preferences as far as qualities in a neighborhood, you could easily end up in an area you hate if you don't do your research beforehand. Fortunately, craigslist seems to be the most extensive source of available housing options you can have. The listings can be arranged by neighborhood and by price range. If it's any consolation, you do not have to live in the city to work in the city. The Bay Area itself has good options with good public transportation that can bring you to your work in the city.
    anie10 likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from Codeman906
    I traveled to SF on vacation a while back, and fell in love.
    Tourism seems to be one of the biggest draw for revenue in the city. I would, however, caution you about being enamored with the city while on vacation vs seeing the realities of living in the city as a resident. While the scenery here is without a doubt breathtaking, the weather can come as a surprise to people unfamiliar with the microclimates due to the close proximity to the ocean and the surrounding bay and the hilly terrain. Fog is a constant visitor on some months and the cold damp air is typical except for a few weeks of hot and sunny days. Except for some neighborhoods tucked around valleys where it is more sunny and less foggy, wearing a spring jacket or a pull-over of some sort is something people here are used to all year round. Despite this, you could easily take a road trip somewhere in an hour and have natural beauty and great weather so it's still definitely a great place to live.
    anie10 likes this.
  6. 0
    Have you considered taking a travel assignment? That Ives youthe hence to get out there, have housing covered, have ajob, find yourself a staff per Diem, etc.
  7. 0
    With your experience, you will definitely get something within a 1-3 months. Definitely start applying online, contact HR and the nurse recruiters in the hospitals you are interested in. Also, if you're planning to make a trip to SF before the ACTUAL move, apply, then make a trip to the hospitals and introduce yourself. I know a couple of nurses that lived out-of-state and got job offer from a prestigious hospital in the bay area. As for living situations, sublet in the city or live near the surrounding areas such as; Daly City, Burlingame, San Bruno etc. Good luck!
  8. 0
    Thank you everyone for all the excellent comments and suggestions! I will be taking a travel assignment there soon, and I hope this will help me get my foot in the door! As far as the weather goes, one of the main reasons I love the area is due to the fact that I love cooler weather, I could be content wearing a hoodie year around! Thanks again everyone!
  9. 0
    Quote from juan de la cruz
    I moved to San Francisco from the Midwest in 2009. Like you, I made sure I endorsed to a California RN license and certificate to practice as an NP. My most important advice is to never make arrangements to move unless you have a firm job offer. Hospitals in the city and the surrounding area have career websites and it's easy to navigate through job openings. I happen to find a job as a nurse practitioner just by looking online. I do have years of experience from the Midwest and the job opportunity I applied for perfectly suited my qualifications. I am saying this only to warn you that the job market in San Francisco and the Bay Area is saturated with many well qualified applicants so don't feel less worthy if you don't get calls right away.

    Now on to living in San Francisco which is a unique city, unlike any place in the US I've ever been to (though it has qualities you will see in other cities outside the US). One, the city has an overwhelmingly liberal political ideology. You will see that in the way the city handles issues pertaining to public service, city and county ordinances, social services, etc. It is extreme and having considered myself a liberal, I am still at times shocked by what I see here. Two, even though it is a tightly compact city (and county, really), there are distinct neighborhoods that actually bleed into each other. Housing is very expensive as you already know but the trick is finding that neighborhood that suits your needs in terms of budget, the lifestyle you want to live, and the proximity to where you will be working.

    I found that apartment hunting is not an easy task here. One, there is competition from other would be renters especially in desirable neighborhoods and good apartment deals go away fast. Two, without being intimately familiar with the neighborhoods in the city and your preferences as far as qualities in a neighborhood, you could easily end up in an area you hate if you don't do your research beforehand. Fortunately, craigslist seems to be the most extensive source of available housing options you can have. The listings can be arranged by neighborhood and by price range. If it's any consolation, you do not have to live in the city to work in the city. The Bay Area itself has good options with good public transportation that can bring you to your work in the city.
    Hey JDLC, can you please give me a summary on the job outlook in California especially in the Los Angeles area? Looking forward to moving there. Thanks!
  10. 0
    I know this is old but I'm bumping it because i had the same question about the Los Angeles area.


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