Life and jobs in San Francisco - page 3

Fellow Humans: I have been performing research about the San Francisco area. So, can you please tell me what jobs and living there is really like? I value input from anyone. Thanks, Kevin... Read More

  1. by   dreamon
    Thanks Suzanne. I am not from California, (NYC actually). So I wouldn't move out there unless I had some experience anyway. I am used to high rent, expensive parking- so I should adjust pretty well.

    I don't know if SF is like NYC in regards to people wanting to move into 'brand name neighborhoods' but I don't mind living somewhere that isn't in order to save some money.
  2. by   JustMe
    Don't get me wrong--I LOVE the City. But I also love my Sierras. That's why I live in the great Central Valley. I'm only a 2hr drive each way to SF or the Sierras. Several places to try: Sacramento area or Stockton-Modesto.
  3. by   dreamon
    Is Sacramento cold? I can't imagine moving to the west coast to have chilly weather.
  4. by   JustMe
    The Valley gets down to about 30 degrees in winter--but no snow. Some fog (we call it tullie fog coz it's low to the ground). Summers can get over 100 (like we are now--see weather.com). We see seasonal changes tho the spring and fall changes tend to be short. I love it here--we don't have near the smog or traffic of the big cities. Lots of room to spread out as we have lots of agriculture around here. The Valley is the nation's breadbasket helping to make California the 7th largest economy in the world. Oh, and we have Arnold as our governor!
    Last edit by JustMe on Jun 20, '08 : Reason: forgot something
  5. by   Kensington
    I live in the city, and I just love it. If you want an urban environment, and be able to walk and public transport to many things, it's GREAT. Yes, parking can be a pain, but you don't have to pay $400/month for a spot. I pay $150/month, and my friend who lives in SOMA pays $200. You can always find a fairly-priced place, but it will require a bit of looking. There are "trendy" neighborhoods, but even still, there are so many of them that I don't think any one stands out. Decide if being close to public transportation is close to you (BART or Muni Rail, although Muni buses are close to everyone pretty much), and then go from there.

    Good luck!
  6. by   crazyframes
    Quote from dreamon
    Is Sacramento cold? I can't imagine moving to the west coast to have chilly weather.
    Moving to SF is going to get you some chilly weather for sure; especially if you're willing to live in the "non-brand name" neighborhoods. Mostly they're non-brand name because they are the foggy areas

    I love in the mid-Richmond area and summer is our coldest time of year. Foggy in the a.m. and again in the p.m. - sometimes it burns off in the middle!

    Don't get fooled in thinking that West Coast = perpetual sunshine!
  7. by   ThatPoshGirl
    If you don't want to be cold you need to move to Southern California. I lived there for a year and I don't think it ever got below 75 and most of the time it was 80+ and only got above 90 for about four days.

    I grew up around Sacramento. It does get cold and it rains a lot in the winter. When I lived there it was frequently over 100 degrees in the summer.

    I've never lived in SF, but I think it is reasonably cool most of the year.

    For those in the SF area, I wonder how accessable and reliable the public transportation system is? I really want to move somewhere with reliable public transportation, but I don't want to go to the east coast.
  8. by   dreamon
    Do the buses run after hours or do they stop at midnight? I prefer working night shift but if I won't have any way to get around I guess a car will be necessary.
  9. by   CityKat
    Actually, the public transportation isn't all that here in the city. I used to be an avid rider of the muni and bart. BART is very pricey and it stops at midnight. Muni is cheap and good, but sometimes you'll have to walk a distance to get somewhere, it isn't like the NYC subway system at all. At night, the buses take FOREVER, it is easier to walk or take a cab.

    If you're going to work the overnight shift, I would certainly recommend driving a car and investing in a garage. I've done that. And as far as finding yourself a garage out here for around $150-$200, you have to really search and even if it means walking 5 blocks to your place, you might have to do it. I did that for one year.
    Right now, I pay $300 and my garage is one block away and it's patrolled this time.
  10. by   CityKat
    Quote from crazyframes
    Moving to SF is going to get you some chilly weather for sure; especially if you're willing to live in the "non-brand name" neighborhoods. Mostly they're non-brand name because they are the foggy areas

    I love in the mid-Richmond area and summer is our coldest time of year. Foggy in the a.m. and again in the p.m. - sometimes it burns off in the middle!

    Don't get fooled in thinking that West Coast = perpetual sunshine!
    That's hilarious. The "non-brand" neighborhoods? I've lived in SF for a total of 9 years and I've never heard that I live in Hayes Valley, so I guess I live in a brand name hood. It still gets foggy, windy and cold. Summer is the coldest time of year in ALL of San Francisco. People always under estimate our weather all the time. This is why we always see tourists downtown with their shorts, sandals and those cheap sweatshirts they sell at the corner stores on when the fog kicks in around 3pm. Not to laugh at them

    And we've been quite lucky the past week with the warmer and very not like SF weather.
  11. by   crazyframes
    Quote from StudentNurseBean
    That's hilarious. The "non-brand" neighborhoods? I've lived in SF for a total of 9 years and I've never heard that I live in Hayes Valley, so I guess I live in a brand name hood. It still gets foggy, windy and cold. Summer is the coldest time of year in ALL of San Francisco. People always under estimate our weather all the time. This is why we always see tourists downtown with their shorts, sandals and those cheap sweatshirts they sell at the corner stores on when the fog kicks in around 3pm. Not to laugh at them

    And we've been quite lucky the past week with the warmer and very not like SF weather.
    Yeah - someone else said name brand so I figured there are some non-brand neighborhoods as well

    It has been gorgeous as of late and I'm loving every minute of it. I know what to expect of the summer so every day I see sunshine at my house is a day to celebrate! However, I think the lack of fog is not helping with all of the fires as of late. Hopefully they'll be able to get those under control soon.

    Public transit in the city of SF has it's good and bad. There are tons of bus lines and a few muni lines. If you live near a muni or BART stop that is much more convenient. As for night transport, the bus system has OWL buses that run on a very reduced schedule between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. I think they typically run every 30 minutes so if you miss it you've got a long wait ahead of you. Overall, it's a pretty good system. I've never been to NYC so can't compare to that but I did live in Chicago for 10 years. There you wouldn't think of living too far from an El stop if you didn't have a car because the buses were terrible. Here, not as bad but the MUNI system doesn't compare to the El at all.

    I'm starting school this fall in Hayward and will be commuting from the far west side of SF out to the East Bay. On public transit it will take me about 1:45 from door to door. That compares to about 1:10 in the car. It will end up being an extra hour each day but I figure that's an extra hour to study!
  12. by   Jazzy_nurse_SF
    Can anyone give me any feedback about the new grad RN programs offered all around the bay area hospitals?
    I am not able to get into the programs due to its full capacity in the bay area, for the rest of the summer and fall.

    Does anyone know about applying for jobs as a regular position level one? Do they at least consider those positions if one is a new RN.
    Thanks for the feedback.
  13. by   CityKat
    New graduate programs in the bay area are MORE competitive than anywhere else. People believe that because we start out with a higher hourly pay, they will make more money. So, they come to California. The reality is that we have higher taxes and the cost of living is higher than 99% of the rest of the country. Yes, here in the bay area, we are neck and neck with Manhattan rent prices. That's quite unbelievable.

    We have new graduate programs only 2x a year and if you're lucky enough to have the departments look over your resume, you might get an interview.
    However, be aware that most of last years graduates who are from SF bay area, have not even been placed yet and so, hospitals are giving them the advantage (I was directly told that by a nursing recruiter).

    Also, take into consideration that UCSF and SF General are all on hiring freezes still, I believe. Not the private hospitals.

    There are plenty of hospitals in the east bay, but all of their summer programs are filled as well. Graduates are fighting to get in anywhere they can right now. You cannot pick and choose your hospital in the bay area.

    I suggest commuting to Sac, Davis, Vallejo or the south or north bay. Along with the east bay.

    Thats just my experience

close