Is Everybody Moving to California? - page 11

Just an observation but, it seems like there's a flood of posts lately from people inquiring about moving here. Not too long ago the local news seemed to be filled with stories about people... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    Quote from lizz
    What's so great about small towns? I lived in a small town of 5,000 people and I'll never do it again.

    Yeah ... there was no traffic. But there wasn't basic services either. No home delivered mail ... you had to pick up the mail in town. No garbage pick up ... even if you paid for pick up you had to bring it to a location to be picked up and, by the time you did that you might as well haul it to the dump yourself ... which was a real hassle.

    There wasn't any decent jobs so you had to drive 60 miles to work anyway. There was only one grocery store so, with no competition, you ended up paying a lot more for food. If you needed anything more than food, you had to drive at least an hour to get to a mall. If you tried to shop by internet, that was also a hassle because there wasn't UPS home delivery either.

    I'm sure different towns vary with available services but, there can be lots of disadvantages to small towns also. If I had to choose between traffic and a small town .... I'd choose traffic any day. Even with the extra traffic, life is a lot more convenient than when I was living in a small town.

    :typing
    Well there is small and then there is small. Many small towns in the past could support their families through a mill, a plant, one or two local groceries other small businesses. These towns are disappearing and becoming suburban hotels. I don't think that supports the idea of community which healthy towns need. Lots of things are great about small towns. They just aren't for everyone...just like the middle of the desert isn't for everyone. All about preference and choice.
  2. by   shodobe
    I live in a town of 766. I moved 10 years ago from a city of 200,000. I have to drive about 20 minutes to shop for groceries, I have to go get my mail, I do have garbage pickup but still go to the dump. I love all of these options and wouldn't go back! I DON'T want people knowing where I live and I don't mind the drive to town. I like going to the dump on weekends. I live on 5 acres on top of a mountain and have a great view. To each their own but I would never give this up for worse traffic! Logging trucks are a way of life up here. Oh, by the way, I work 450 miles away so commuting isn't an issue.
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from shodobe
    I live in a town of 766. I moved 10 years ago from a city of 200,000. I have to drive about 20 minutes to shop for groceries, I have to go get my mail, I do have garbage pickup but still go to the dump. I love all of these options and wouldn't go back! I DON'T want people knowing where I live and I don't mind the drive to town. I like going to the dump on weekends. I live on 5 acres on top of a mountain and have a great view. To each their own but I would never give this up for worse traffic! Logging trucks are a way of life up here. Oh, by the way, I work 450 miles away so commuting isn't an issue.
    Well ... as they say ... to each their own.

    You enjoy hauling garbage to the dump? Ok. Throwing stinky garbage into the back of my SUV wasn't my idea of fun, but that's just me. Even when I opened all of the windows I still couldn't get rid of the smell ...

    Just curious but you work 450 miles away but commuting isn't an issue? How can that be? For most people, driving 450 miles would be a major commuting issue. Do you live near your job during the week or something like that?

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Oct 22, '06
  4. by   smk1
    I think shodobe stays by work and then goes home for the rest of the week. I think this was posted in a thread a long time ago...
  5. by   NewJA
    Well, I spent the first 23 yrs of my life in the middle of nowhere, and the next 10 years in the middle of major cities (Phoenix and D.C.).

    I prefer the country (in a nice area - not in a desert) for the quiet, the minimal traffic, the scenery, and the outdoor activities.

    But I prefer the city for many conveniences (not having to haul rotten garbage in my vehicle to the dump, for example), although the traffic and smog are INconveniences, and for vastly superior social services, health care, work opportunities, and things to do. Lastly, in the city, one can make friends so much easier than in the country, where one can pretty much forget about making friends or finding a partener, unles they attend church. Actually, with the social services and health care in the country side as abysmall as they are, not living in the city is out of the question for me right now on those criteria alone.

    I'm just curious, why would you NOT want people to know where you live? And I am equally confused about the comuting not being an issue when you work 450 miles form home.... For me, that couldn't possibly be more of an issue, even if I did stay the whole week there to work.
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Jeff A
    I'm just curious, why would you NOT want people to know where you live?
    Yeah ... I was wondering about that also.

    People can find out where I live, but they better not set foot on my property. My dogs would be a major problem for them.

  7. by   smk1
    We have a friend who house-sits every once in awhile for a couple who live here in WA state yet work in San Francisco. They both make over 100k per year and work 2 days per week. They fly out there every week and stay for 2 days and fly home. Costs about 200-300 dollars roundtrip, and the cost of living is so much lower here that they are now millionaires and in their early 30's. Nice home along the lewis river, lots of time off etc... It sure isn't conventional, but they make far more money flying down there every week than they would living there or working up here, they also benefit from having a 1 hour flight. They get to the airport with only a carryon bag about 1 hour early and don't fight traffic. Not a bad set up.
  8. by   mumpet5
    I am a California native, moved in my 30's to Germany, and then back home to Texas, now I am in NM, I love las cruces weather, but there's nothing to see or do here. I MISS the coast, I miss my family, right now some of my family are in LA Quinta, some in San fernando valley, I wont move there, but what does anyone know or think about the Palm Springs, La Quinta, Rancho Mirage area? I am an LVN. thanks
  9. by   CaliAlli
    Quote from SMK1
    We have a friend who house-sits every once in awhile for a couple who live here in WA state yet work in San Francisco. They both make over 100k per year and work 2 days per week. They fly out there every week and stay for 2 days and fly home. Costs about 200-300 dollars roundtrip, and the cost of living is so much lower here that they are now millionaires and in their early 30's. Nice home along the lewis river, lots of time off etc... It sure isn't conventional, but they make far more money flying down there every week than they would living there or working up here, they also benefit from having a 1 hour flight. They get to the airport with only a carryon bag about 1 hour early and don't fight traffic. Not a bad set up.
    What do these two people do?! Assuming they work 12 hour shifts, that's 24 hrs a week for each. That's 1248 hours a year (assuming they work 24 hours EVERY week of the year). That's slightly more than $80 an hour for each. Is this true?!
  10. by   smk1
    Quote from CaliAlli
    What do these two people do?! Assuming they work 12 hour shifts, that's 24 hrs a week for each. That's 1248 hours a year (assuming they work 24 hours EVERY week of the year). That's slightly more than $80 an hour for each. Is this true?!
    THey aren't nurses, but I posted this because for some people it works out to have a long "commute" if you are being paid enough. Shodobe (who is a nurse) posted in another thread that she/he made 120k last year, so he/she probably has a situation where the 450 mile commute is probably worth it.
  11. by   WDWpixieRN
    I have a friend who's been a psych nurse for many years....she and her then-husband worked for hospitals in southern CA and lived in Las Vegas....they commuted for the 3 days or so they worked by flying in and staying with her sister, then flying home when they were off....apparently it paid better than working in town where they lived...I don't think the commuters are so much the rare exception....
  12. by   shodobe
    Every situation is un ique. Mine is an exception. My wife and I, yes I'm a guy, decided years ago when we moved up north that this would have to be. At first it was very difficult to leave home for days at a time only to return for only a few. This definitely not for everyone. We don't have kids, after 30 years, which where we live would make the difference. The rural area isn't really for kids, I feel sorry for the ones that live there. The resources aren't there or are very far away for them. I DO enjoy driving, listen to a lot of books along the way. I only make the money I do because when I go south to work that is the only thing I do, WORK! I work full-time at the one place I have been at for almost 30 years and work PT at one other hospital, another CHW facility. Also a few days a month at a Surgicenter. The other hours I put in at the other facility is considered OT because both hospitals are part of one Corp thus my high income. This is a VERY unique situation which is not available to anyone who just decides one day to do it. It took me several years to get where I am today with alot of persistence on my part. I work very, very hard for my salary and it is worth every penny.
  13. by   06rncawastate
    I had to move from California because there are way too many people there. I miss it though. I lived in San Jose-not too far from the beach, from San Franciso, the Sierras. LA and Disneyland. We couldnt afford to live there yet sometimes i get kind of regretful that we did move.It was hard to adjust to the differences here at first, people here in Washington are different-at least where I moved to and all,. I guess I still hope to go back someday.

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