Info on L.A. County College of Nursing & Allied Health - page 2

Does anyone had any first hand expirience with this school. Any info would be greatly appreciated.:thankya:... Read More

  1. by   SRRIII
    I attended LA county and loved the experience. You get to experience everything. I got to see surgeries being performed (open heart, brain tumor removal) and other procedures. Also most of the patients I had for clinicals were poor, so they didn't get much medical attention prior to being hospitalized, so they were more complicated. You see more homeless, drug users, and incarcerated pts, things you won't see in a private hospital were you need insurance in order to be there. The teachers are tough the 1st semester, they are more Old School. It gets easier as the semesters goes on. I think any Nursing School is hard, you just got to study, prepare well for clincals and practise your skills.

    Good Luck
  2. by   xstarsfallingx
    One thing no one mentioned (and correct me if I'm wrong)...the main difference between the County program and the community college/private schools in LA is that it is a diploma program, not an associate's degree.

    I believe the problem comes up if you pursue an advanced degree. Sometimes credits do not transfer as they would from other campuses since they are on a different track.

    You get to do your rotations at USC, and it's definitely a unique experience. The demographic is very poor/uninsured and they are generally very appreciative of their care.
  3. by   tack131
    I did a lot of research on this school and it is not true. You do receive an associate's degree, but your generals are taken through East Los Angeles College (or any community college).

    http://www.ladhs.org/wps/portal/CollegeOfNursing :typing

    Quote from xstarsfallingx
    One thing no one mentioned (and correct me if I'm wrong)...the main difference between the County program and the community college/private schools in LA is that it is a diploma program, not an associate's degree.

    I believe the problem comes up if you pursue an advanced degree. Sometimes credits do not transfer as they would from other campuses since they are on a different track.

    You get to do your rotations at USC, and it's definitely a unique experience. The demographic is very poor/uninsured and they are generally very appreciative of their care.
  4. by   calinurseS
    Hi there. I applied to this school for Spring 2009. I have not heard whether I am in or not, but I was looking into the accreditation of this school and they are not accredited by NLNAC. I would really like to attend, as I have heard great things about this program, but the lack of accreditation scares me a bit in terms of my opportunities for graduate study.

    I understand that it is approved by the state of CA. Does that mean that I won't be able to work in any other state? Also, does that mean that I won't be able to get an advanced practice degree?

    Any clarification on this would be great. Thanks
  5. by   tack131
    As far as I know, you receive the exact same degree as any other school and the NLNAC is only a voluntary accreditation committee that wouldn't affect licensure in any other state. In my research, no advanced degree programs require NLNAC accreditation. You have a degree from a regionally accredited program (the most recognized academic accreditation which is the kind all major universities and colleges have), a license and board certification. Like I said, as far as I have researched, NLNAC is more like endorsement by the nursing association and is not any type of requirement for licensure or advanced degree requirements. You may want to do your own research though, just to be on the safe side

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