How in the world do you make it in CA? - page 3

Hi Cali Nurses, I graduate from Nursing school may 6th :hatparty: and I have always fancied moving to CA. I spoke with a nurse recruiter at UCLA and was alerted that the pay would be: 25.36/hr... Read More

  1. by   SJSU_Mami
    I grew up in Socal, and went to school and now work and live in Norcal. The cost of living is expensive in both places but I get paid 10.00 more up here so decided not to move back home. I think its a significant difference to me and all the people I went to school with who came from SD and LA have chosen to settle and work in the Bay. Here we get night diffs of 18%.
  2. by   cookie78
    I live in the thick of it in Northern California in Berkeley or Berzerkely as some call it Ha! I just got my first new grad job at a hospital in San Francisco and it pays 39.45 an hour for day shift rate. However you have to realize that most people have to pay a $3-5 toll for the bridges or a $6-7 bart fare daily if they don't drive. Also housing market here is like $600,000 average right now. But I live in a bad apartment with a roomie in a nice area and we split $1100 rent, that I think is like living for free when you consider most rents. I concur however that it would be impossible to leave this place, everytime I think "oh man it would be so much cheaper in -you name the state-" I remember all the lovely california things and can't imagine my life elsewhere.
  3. by   Daytonite
    Quote from cookie78
    I live in the thick of it in Northern California in Berkeley or Berzerkely as some call it Ha! I just got my first new grad job at a hospital in San Francisco and it pays 39.45 an hour for day shift rate. However you have to realize that most people have to pay a $3-5 toll for the bridges or a $6-7 bart fare daily if they don't drive. Also housing market here is like $600,000 average right now. But I live in a bad apartment with a roomie in a nice area and we split $1100 rent, that I think is like living for free when you consider most rents. I concur however that it would be impossible to leave this place, everytime I think "oh man it would be so much cheaper in -you name the state-" I remember all the lovely california things and can't imagine my life elsewhere.
    fftopic: This is a little off the subject, but as an old (and I mean OLD) nurse and person I would strongly advise you to save your money and buy a home a soon as you have enough for a down payment. Real estate is one of the best ways to make your money grow. You can't do it as well with bank accounts nowadays. I've spent over 30 years paying rent and could be owning my own house and having the dog I always wanted if I had been a lot smarter about my money.
  4. by   cookie78
    Not to worry daytonite...My family taught me very well about saving for a house. I grew up in a household where my parents saved for everything, paid cash for most everything and didn't buy anything (more or less) that wasn't a necessity. I never wanted for anything as a child but on the other hand we never had anything fancy. I live completely within this spirit. It will however take me a little while as a single girl to save up for the houses in this area because they are so expensive, and the property taxes are insane! So meanwhile I am living cheaply and renting, and saving. On one point I disagree with you however, I don't personally subscribe to the real estate as investment theory when it applies to your own home that you plan to live in. When you live in your own home it is a place to live, and especially in this market where you might pay close to $1 million dollars for a first time home, I don't see it growing massively in my lifetime the way my parents home did when they bought it in 1980 for $90,000 in the silicon valley. At this point most people like me will struggle just to pay the mortgage and little else. So that is why I am waiting a little bit, but saving in the meantime.
  5. by   ellescorpio
    Quote from HONEYBEAR
    I lived in California....(Long Beach) from 1993-99.........loved the weather, beaches, desert, and Big Bear hated...the smog, crime, cost of living.......the parking lots: 405, 91, 605, and the 710, my hubby and I are the very few that mostly likely do not miss California But saying that, we do not like Ohio......cannot wait to move to Texas...... ....Do not mean to offend anyone.
    I don't know what you are looking for....but I doubt TX has it....It's almost always hot and humid.....generally people are very close-minded....no offense to fellow texans. I am willing to tell you more if you care...but I just don't think many people would like it here.....unless they were hatched into it......best of luck to you.
  6. by   hipab4hands
    [QUOTE=prmenrs]There are 5 hospitals in the UC system: San Diego, Irvine, LA, SF, and Davis (near Sacramento). Unless your heart is set on LA, check them all out. My hunch is that Davis would be the least expensive for living. It's hot in Sacramento. But it is the State Capital, there's lots happening.

    Sorry to burst your bubble, but Davis is a very expensive place to live in. The housing is in high demand and difficult to find. You'll find that many nurses can can not afford to live in the area and are commuting from the Central Valley area- Stockton, etc.,-, which is more than an hour away.
  7. by   tntrn
    Just yesterday I heard about a study that named Seattle as the most over-priced city in the US. No surprise, considering how liberal and tax-happy the elected officials there are. And I guess the populace like paying taxes too, because they vote in a lot of them, and do not vote out the lawmakers who represent them.
  8. by   jelly
    Quote from adriadawn
    Hi Cali Nurses,

    I graduate from Nursing school may 6th :hatparty: and I have always fancied moving to CA. I spoke with a nurse recruiter at UCLA and was alerted that the pay would be: 25.36/hr 4.00/hr for nights and 2.50 for weekends. $1500 relocation and no sign on bonus. That is NOT enough! That weekend diff is pittiful!!! The cost of living in California is soooo high especially if you expect to live somewhere near the hospital (Bev. hills) The pay here That I am being offered here in Indianapolis is this 19/hr plus 4.00/hr for nights and 5.50/hr. for weekend diff. 11.00/hr for holidays and a $5,000 sign on bonus. The cost of living in Indianapolis area is MUCH LOWER than Ca. I mean you can get a 4 br. nice house ,nice area here for 170,000 (maybe less maybe more depending on amenities such as a basement) gas ranges from 1.58 to 1.99 sometimes, groceries aren't bad, eating out isnt bad either a really nice greek place that serves a huge delicious dinner may cost 25-30 a person and you save half of it for the next day in left overs.

    I have always wanted to live in NY or CA because of the liberal atmosphere and diversity. Also, I have dreamed since childhood of acting and Indiana doesnt exaclty offer much in that department. But.... In Indiana it seems I could have a much more comfortable life. How do you CA nurses afford anything???? The pay DOES NOT seem to reflect cost of living at all! Any advice on how you live, or info on how much things cost(I already know that rent and housing is ridiculous), how many hrs you have to work to be able to survive, can you afford to do fun things?

    Thank you!
    Also traffic seems to be horrific, how is it at night? Is public transportation good?
    I just moved to the LA area and commute 1 1/2 hrs to and from work each day and still pay twice as much for a condo than I did for my house in colorado. Don't get me started! :P
  9. by   jelly
    Quote from ellescorpio
    I don't know what you are looking for....but I doubt TX has it....It's almost always hot and humid.....generally people are very close-minded....no offense to fellow texans. I am willing to tell you more if you care...but I just don't think many people would like it here.....unless they were hatched into it......best of luck to you.
    Texas is the best!
  10. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Gomer
    25.45 + 4.00 = 29.45/hr, but with the 4 hr OT (for the 12-hour shift which most LA hospitals have) your average hourly rate would be 34.25. I think that's pretty good for someone with less than a year's experience. Also UCLA has excellent benefits, not to mention it has a great reputation.

    No you wont be able to buy a house (unless you have $450,000 laying around) and most people do commute (the freeway traffic is terrible). A 1-bedroom apartment in a good neighborhood will run you at least $1200/mo (check out www.apartmentguide.com for more information). But still, LA is a wonderful place to live, work, and grow. As for public transportation? That's a foreign term around here. A car is a requirement of life. (By the way, I live and work on the "West Side" which is the area from the ocean to about the Beverly Hills area. My commute to work is about 15 mins., no freeway, my rent is $1600/mo and I love working and living here.)
    You can't buy a house for $450,000 where I live. Possibly, you could find a beat up condo in that price range, so it becomes a real dilemma for new grads. They've probably never imagined themselves living in those conditions, after having worked so hard to become a nurse. I had one of the residents tell me last year that she and her fiance are leaving after she finishes the program because they can't afford anything they'd want to live in. She's a doctor and he's a lawyer, and they can't afford a house. I have no idea how young people do it. We bought our first house for $129,000, and put all our profit down on this house, so it isn't that difficult. I can't imagine how we'd be able to pay $700,000 for the simple little ranch houses in my neighborhood, but that's what they're going for.
  11. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from mercyteapot
    You can't buy a house for $450,000 where I live. Possibly, you could find a beat up condo in that price range, so it becomes a real dilemma for new grads. They've probably never imagined themselves living in those conditions, after having worked so hard to become a nurse. I had one of the residents tell me last year that she and her fiance are leaving after she finishes the program because they can't afford anything they'd want to live in. She's a doctor and he's a lawyer, and they can't afford a house. I have no idea how young people do it. We bought our first house for $129,000, and put all our profit down on this house, so it isn't that difficult. I can't imagine how we'd be able to pay $700,000 for the simple little ranch houses in my neighborhood, but that's what they're going for.
    One on my neighbors put his home up for sale. It was built in the 1950's and is approximately 1400 sq ft. The asking price is $400,000.
  12. by   Geeg
    I moved from OH to CA years ago, you are correct the pay is laughable. However, if good weather is a priority, then CA has it.
  13. by   USFguy
    Quote from Geeg
    I moved from OH to CA years ago, you are correct the pay is laughable. However, if good weather is a priority, then CA has it.
    I was born and raised in california and lived on both ends of the state (SF bay area and LA metro area). The pay out here is high and you can make it if renting is fine with you. I remember some statistic by the California Realty Association that said only 16% of californians could afford a home and only 8% in the SF bay area. Buying a home in this state is hard. Even homes out in "once thought to be" remote areas like Stockton in the northern half and Palmdale in the southern half, cost $300,000 and upwards. You have to add long commutes onto that, high taxes (property taxes sometimes can cost the amount of rent for a small studio--seriously), transportation costs (car registration is expensive, so is the cost to ride BART in SF or MetroLink in LA).

    Having lived here my whole life, I'm ready to give up the diversity, weather, liberal people for somewhere I can live a bit more comfortably. I mean, in Houston, I could pay $260,000 for a 5 bedroom house in a master-planned community that would cost 3 times that much in CA. That is just too huge of a difference for me. CA's just not worth $500,000 more. That's really what it comes down to. Why would I pay $300,000 to live in Palmdale, with at least a 1 hour commute, with many uneducated people when I could pay less and live in Houston, with a 20 min. commute with many educated people.

    I always wonder why people struggle so much to live in CA. Maybe it's the image and luster. I don't know but I am getting a reality check and moving to a place in the country that I can really afford.

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