Help... L.V.N.? R.N.? - page 2

I'm taking Human Physiology which is my last pre-requsite for the nursing program. In completion of this course, my decision is to attend Concorde Career Institute to become an L.V.N. After... Read More

  1. by   waves
    Quote from sgherzi4
    Hi Waves;
    I have been an LVN for 25 years and just now @ the ripe 'ol age of 49 (almost!) am thinking about going back for my RN. Lack of respect and poor pay are the main reasons. Once you have some experience as an LVN you can get into some RN programs a bit easier. By the way, what hospitals in No. CA are "helping the LVN's ro become RN's?". I live and work in Tehachapi, CA
    Hey there. Both Kaiser and Sutter in Sonoma and Lake Counties (and possibly elsewhere?) are helping LVNs including lining up preceptors and paying the bridgers for one day of study time each week. The new legislation, which court rulings confirmed, says the new licensed nurse to patient ratios do NOT include LVNs only RNs. This means that the LVNs that are already employed will be helped; but it will be almost impossible for a new LVN to get a hospital job...unless the hospitals will have "extra" nurses which would be LVNs. The RNs union pushed very hard to maintain that the RNs are the only ones qualified as licensed nurses. Since I don't graduate until early 2005, I guess I'll be headed to home health, a SNF, or an office. Crazy! Not really what I want...but I just have to head right for the JC to start in on all the pre-req classes to enter an RN program.
  2. by   waves
    Quote from moliuchick

    I am just wondering why you don't want to enroll in the 2yr RN program. I know that PPC in Pasadena has the 2 yr RN program and they are not the only college that has it. If you still want a BS degree, you can do it later after you become an RN. A lot of Hospitals will pay you to go to school.
    A 2 year RN program is two years after meeting all pre-entrance requirements. At the comm college in Santa Rosa, if you already have a degree you are very low priority for signing up for classes. There are always wait lists for classes. So the pre-reqs that should take a year and a half or two to get....take two to three years. Then the RN program accepts 1/4 of the folks who apply. It was based on points but may shift to lottery....so plan 1 to 3 years to be accepted. THEN the two year program starts. So a two year program can take longer to complete than a four year.
  3. by   RN,BSN,MSN
    Quote from CA CoCoRN
    First of all, realize that working as an LVN may not benefit you much going through the RN program. Financially: you'll be starting as a new grad LVN...and LVN wages don't pay all that much. I don't know what retail pays, but if you get a pretty good hourly (more than $10 or $11/hr) then you'd pretty much be making what LVNs start at. As an LVN you can make more by working Registry, however, you MUST have experience to get that money.

    Practice: LVN practice is vastly different from a medical standpoint. You don't even think on the same level as an RN. From assessment to advanced skills...you won't have practical experience as an LVN.

    Time: why spend the time going for your LVN, then going into a three to four year track that it will take you to get your RN. You CAN NOT challenge NCLEX-RN, even if you're an LVN. If you are anxious to get to nursing, go to a two year RN, with the foreknowledge that you'll go back for your four year.

    At least, you'll start at RN wages, and build on your RN knowledge, rather than LVN-->RN.
    this post is right on it!!
  4. by   tiff_faith2001
    Quote from lizz
    Just a note of caution. While LVN experience can be helpful before becoming an RN, there have been reports of hospitals cutting back on LVNs, CNAs and other support staff to make room in the budget to hire more RNs because of California's new RN ratio law.

    So you may want to check out the job market and make sure the opportunities are still going to be there.

    Also, becoming an LVN can help you save some RN school time. However, you also have to take the LVN challenge exams, and 50 percent of the people who take those fail and end up having to do the two full years anyway, at least at my ADN program. So you may want to go ahead and do the direct RN route if you're considering those kind of options.

    I'm not necessarily saying you shouldn't go through with your LVN plans. But these are other factors you may want to research and consider.

    :spin:
    But, there is still a desperate need for nurses of any kind in most places! And if you get your lvn, most hopsitals, or other areas of work will reimburse you to get your RN. I guess im lucky because I have found a program that allows your to practice as an LPN after your first year of school, and continue for your ADN in the second year!
  5. by   moliuchick
    Quote from waves
    A 2 year RN program is two years after meeting all pre-entrance requirements. At the comm college in Santa Rosa, if you already have a degree you are very low priority for signing up for classes. There are always wait lists for classes. So the pre-reqs that should take a year and a half or two to get....take two to three years. Then the RN program accepts 1/4 of the folks who apply. It was based on points but may shift to lottery....so plan 1 to 3 years to be accepted. THEN the two year program starts. So a two year program can take longer to complete than a four year.
    :uhoh21: Oh, I see what you mean. I think i am a little out updated on the California nursing program. I moved from L.A. in 2000 to Minnesota and I transferred my pre-req from Cal state LA to a local community college here. My GPA is 4.0 and they accepted me right away for their 2 yr RN program. I only have one more year to go and that's pretty much it. When I was back in LA, I had considered being a LVN because they didn't even have 2 yr RN program back then.
    I was just lucky enough that I took all the pre-req that needed for my school now.
  6. by   debblynn13
    I like the way my CC has our nursing program set up. The Rn program is two years long, after prereqs of course. The first year is considered the LPN program and you can take your PN boards after you graduate with your LPN diploma. Then in the fall you go back and finish up with the RN year (Associate Degree). This way I can get out in the medical field a bit and get comfortable with basic nursing while under an RN. Sometimes I think I should have taken a year or two off in the middle to get even more experience. But I decided at my age, I couldn't wait around...LOL

    Good luck
    Debblynn
  7. by   natasha700
    Well I have to tell you I was a LVN for 4 years before I became a RN. Yes LVN's scope is different in some cases but it sure pulled me through RN nursing school in fact I breezed through the program because in a way LVN prepared me especially with bedside nursing. I dont regret being a LVN first and you will find quite a few RNs were LVNs first. When I started the salary did suck and as far as experience I started in the nursing home for about 6 months then I worked registry til I finished the rest of my classes for RN school. You can make some money as a LVN the highest I pulled was about 19$ an hour because I searched and never got comfortable. One of the drawbacks as a LVN you are limited in your areas. I love NICU and there weren't too many if any hospitals that would let a LVN work in NICU but I figure any stepping stone is never a waste of time because it builds character and you really appreciate it in the long run. LVN school was really tough and I believe it made me a better nurse today. I still keep my first LVN license in my wallet as momento because I truly worked hard for it and like everything else in my future will be no different.
  8. by   baker82
    Quote from tyk80
    I'm taking Human Physiology which is my last pre-requsite for the nursing program. In completion of this course, my decision is to attend Concorde Career Institute to become an L.V.N. After completing the L.V.N program, I will then enroll into a Bachelor's program for R.N. My question is.... what is some thoughts/ideas/personal outlooks on this??? I'm just really stumped at the moment because I work in retail, Anchor Blue, and it just seems to me that it would be beneficial to take a year off and go to school to become an L.V.N. and then enroll into a Bachelor's program for R.N. after a year but work as an L.V.N. while in the nursing program. Please, anyone help me. I'm currently in the hi-desert in California.

    I say go for it! I received my LVN through experience in the Army and I got off of active duty in november and finished my prereq's for the BSN program this past June in the high desert at VVC. I am in the BSN program this fall at HSU.

    Its a great idea. I work at a nursing home and I being a LVN am a charge nurse there. If a long term care facility is for you-you will have the same responsibilities as a RN which is really good hands on experience. You'll get really great experience for your resume and where I live in eureka, CA I get 22.00/hr starting. Not bad for a college student.
    Last edit by baker82 on Jul 31, '07
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from baker82
    I say go for it!
    Old thread alert. . .this thread is over three years old, and the original poster has not been active on this site for quite a long time. Albeit, the advice still remains prudent and useful!
  10. by   ellaneza
    i don't understand why, a lot of you make it sound so easy to apply for the 2yr RN programs at community colleges. over here in so. california, as many of us know how competitive it is to get into the program. to top it off, many of the community colleges base their acceptances through lottery systems. if you're at a community college or cal state, it's hard to get into bio courses for pre-reqs because there are so many students who share the same interests of becoming a nurse. like i said, it's highly competitive. i attend a cal state univ. and it's tough just trying to get into the classes, because they only offer like 5 sections for each course.. and there's like 500 students (i could be exaggerating), but still too many students going after that one course.. I'M TIRED OF WAITING. my last resort is to become an LVN, hoping that i will further my studies to becoming an RN as well. i hope it works out for those who are doing the same thing as well...
  11. by   fognurse
    Quote from ellaneza
    i don't understand why, a lot of you make it sound so easy to apply for the 2yr RN programs at community colleges. over here in so. california, as many of us know how competitive it is to get into the program. to top it off, many of the community colleges base their acceptances through lottery systems. if you're at a community college or cal state, it's hard to get into bio courses for pre-reqs because there are so many students who share the same interests of becoming a nurse. like i said, it's highly competitive. i attend a cal state univ. and it's tough just trying to get into the classes, because they only offer like 5 sections for each course.. and there's like 500 students (i could be exaggerating), but still too many students going after that one course.. I'M TIRED OF WAITING. my last resort is to become an LVN, hoping that i will further my studies to becoming an RN as well. i hope it works out for those who are doing the same thing as well...
    I have been an LVN for 28 years in the bay area. I work for a homecare organization. I do nursing assessments on the clients and help to supervise our caregivers who work in these clients' homes. Just FYI, I make about $65K/year plus mileage(50.5 cents/mile). They need nurses! Go for it and good luck!
  12. by   psychnurse1998
    These posts very much remind me of the 12 blind men and the elephant. One felt the legs and thought it was very much like a tree, and so goes the story. I felt the elephant, and it went like this..I was in an Rn program, but this was in 1971..but the most confident students, the ones that had the highest pass rate, were the ones that had worked as Lvns first. As I have gotten older I have learned more and more the value of experience. Put a new Rn graduate next to an Lvn who has had lets say 5 years of acute care experience, and I would bet on the LVN. Sorry to disagree a higher title does not translate into necesarly more competence. If you havent learned that yet...you will as you work with other health care providers. In psych right now, we have Rns passing meds, but thats what Lvns usually do. One Rn commented the main difference between what we do and what you do is the pay. Its true there is more to being a competent Rn than passsing meds. Its true also nursing has changed so much since 71. So please keep all of the posts in mind as you make your decision.

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